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Eat Your Greens: The Surprising Power of Homegrown Leaf Crops (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 14. Oktober 2014


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With wit and reason, Kennedy makes a compelling case - based on sound nutritional and sustainability grounds - to start producing and eating more greens. Delicious, leafy green vegetables grown at home can effectively fill voids left by the industrial food system as well as the local food movement by making fresh, highly nutritious foods readily available from small garden spaces and at low costs throughout much of the year. Kennedy’s new book is a practical instructional manual on how to grow and prepare leafy edible plants, many of which are unavailable at grocery stores and farmers markets, overlooked by gardeners and rarely considered in the kitchen. It offers a simple, grassroots solution to help counter the immense public-health burden that has arisen from our high-calorie, nutrient-poor diet. Reading this book could change lives, communities and society for the better. ---Sean Clark, Professor and Farm Director, Berea College

Leaf crops produce the most nutrition from the least space while requiring the fewest inputs. The trouble is . . . many valuable leafy vegetables are unknown to gardeners. Nor do we know how to prepare or preserve them. Dave Kennedy's Eat Your Greens provides all this information. The book should be on the shelf of every serious gardener. ---Steve Solomon, Author of Gardening When it Counts and Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades

David Kennedy makes a compelling case for home gardens as a vital element of our food system and for expanding our food and garden horizons by growing super-nutritious greens, including some novel leaf crops and traditional crops used in new ways. A great resource for those wishing to increase their food security, Eat Your Greens offers detailed information on growing, eating, and preserving greens that both novice and experienced gardeners will welcome.
---Susan Littlefield, Horticultural Editor – National Gardening Association

Eat Your Greens is a refreshingly thoughtful and practical book for the new wave of savvy gardeners interested in exploring the full potential of home gardens. One of the world’s experts on leafy green crops opens his garden gate to show us an amazing array of 21 beautiful and some little-known greens that will make you wonder where they’ve been all your life. Going way beyond kale and kale chips, readers will learn how to grow greens, extend their harvest, and preserve them for year-round use. Creative and delicious recipes such as Cheesy Grits with Okinawa Spinach and Sweet Potato Leaves Salad are included. Though some of the information is technical, “Greens Guru” David Kennedy shares it in a friendly, easy-to-understand voice that sounds like it could be coming from your neighbor over the fence. In addition to the directive “Eat Your Greens” we can now add “Read Eat Your Greens “ as excellent advice that will make us healthier and happier.
---Anita Courtney, M.S.,R.D., Chairperson / Tweens Nutrition and Fitness Coalition


David Kennedy is one of the rare individuals who is a brilliant analyst, researcher and practitioner. So often we are told what is wrong with the world and less often told what the solution is. Almost never is the solution lived out with a working model of simplicity and function. David does all three with equal depth.

I was very excited when he told me that he was writing Eat Your Greens: The Surprising Power of Homegrown Leaf Crops because I knew it would not just be scholarly but also very practical. Our work is with the poorest of the poor in developing countries and David’s training resources have made the greatest impact on what we do but at the same time I have painfully watched the effects of nutritional poverty in the west for years. Everything that I wished could be said to my western friends is in this new book. There is now no excuse to be destined to a life of mediocre health.

It may be hard to believe but a couple of small four by eight foot kitchen gardens, that take minutes a day to maintain can turn the tide of deteriorating old age for so many reasons. Read the book more than once.
---Dale Bolton, Founder and Director of Organics4Orphans.org

Low-fat or low-carb? Vegan or paleo? Whole grain or gluten-free? Nutrition has become complicated by competing diets and health claims. The world's biggest food corporations add to this confusion and profit from it at the same time. In Eat Your Greens, David Kennedy cuts through the fog and shows us that the journey to optimum health can begin with a single, simple step into the backyard vegetable garden. The message of why and how we can eat more fresh, nutrient-rich greens isn't a marketing ploy designed to bolster some company's bottom line. It's a timeless, universal truth and one that Kennedy tells convincingly.
-Roger Doiron, Founding Director, Kitchen Gardeners International

Increase the biodiversity of your diet and your garden by expanding the variety of leaves you eat; often from the plants you are already growing for other uses—even cover crops! If you have heard of eating leaves of some plants, but are hesitant to try them because you have also heard they may contain irritants if not properly prepared, let David Kennedy show you the way. Kennedy’s expertise and passion for creating a healthy population with the help of leafy greens are evident in this book. In this ever-changing world we need to stay open to the possibilities of all our gardens have to offer. Great book!
---Cindy Conner, Homeplace Earth, author Grow a Sustainable Diet and Seed Libraries.

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Turn over a new leaf with these nutritional powerhouses for your kitchen garden

This book should be on the shelf of every serious gardener. ---Steve Solomon, Author of Gardening When it Counts and Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades

A practical instructional manual on how to grow and prepare leafy edible plants, many of which are unavailable at grocery stores and farmers markets, overlooked by gardeners and rarely considered in the kitchen… reading this book could change lives, communities and society for the better.---Sean Clark, Professor and Farm Director, Berea College

With more nutrients per calorie and square foot of growing space than any other food, leaf crops can be an invaluable addition to every yard or garden. As hardy as they are versatile, these beautiful, tasty vegetables range from the familiar to the exotic. Some part of this largely untapped food resource can thrive in almost any situation.

Eat Your Greens provides complete instructions for incorporating these nutritional powerhouses into any kitchen garden. This innovative guide:
• Shows how familiar garden plants such as sweet potato, okra, beans, peas and pumpkins can be grown to provide both nourishing leaves and other calorie- and protein-rich foods
• Introduces a variety of non-traditional alternatives readily adapted to local growing conditions, such as chaya, moringa, toon and wolfberry
• Explains how to improve your soil while getting plenty of vegetables by growing edible cover crops.

Beginning with a comprehensive overview of modern commercial agriculture, and rounded out by a selection of advanced techniques and easy recipes to maximize, preserve and prepare your harvest, Eat Your Greens is an invaluable addition to the library of any gardening enthusiast.

A great resource for those wishing to increase their food security, Eat Your Greens offers detailed information on growing, eating, and preserving greens that both novice and experienced gardeners will welcome.---Susan Littlefield, Horticultural Editor – National Gardening Association

Eat Your Greens is a refreshingly thoughtful and practical book for the new wave of savvy gardeners interested in exploring the full potential of home gardens.-- ---Anita Courtney, M.S.,R.D., Chairperson / Tweens Nutrition and Fitness Coalition


Dave Kennedy is the founder and director of Leaf for Life, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the elimination of global malnutrition through the optimum use of leaf crops, and the author of 21st Century Greens and the Leaf for Life Handbook.

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Amazon.com: 4.4 von 5 Sternen 5 Rezensionen
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fantastic resource 16. Dezember 2014
Von Amazon Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
WOW everything I didn't know about growing and incorporating leafy greens in our lives. I was shocked at the nutritional value of greens, specially the protein of dried leaf concentrate. This book goes from the cellular level of plants along to some nice recipes. Thorough explanations and alternatives and data. All questions were answered including how to hide greens in foods for picky eaters and grow year round in colder climates.
Big garden changer for me.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great book. 6. Dezember 2014
Von Elizabeth Kaup - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This is a unique and invaluable book. It covers all aspects of growing, preserving and utilizing leaves, plus the reasons why we will absolutely have to do this, sooner or later... so let's get started now!!

Great book... money well spent ;)
7 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen More manifesto about commercial food growth than useful content 13. Januar 2015
Von CA in Austin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I purchased the book looking forward to diversifying what I grow in the garden. The first chapter that starts to discuss alternatives to grow doesn't begin until page 97, and includes some common crops. There are some summary listings for several plants that were of interest, with details on a few more. If you are looking for horticultural information on growing green leafy vegetables, a web search and your local extension office are good resources. The author's foundation sounds like a great cause, but it's not why I purchased the book. Recipes start on page 215, and there are sections on setting up a garden, vertical gardening and preservation also in the book (before the recipes).
5.0 von 5 Sternen Attention backyard gardeners, herbalists, and supporters of organic gardening 3. Juli 2015
Von GreatBooksforyou - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Eat your greens: The surprising power of home grown leaf crops
by David Kennedy
ISBN 978-0-86571-751-0
Published by New Society Publishers, www.newsociety.com

--Reviewed by Craig Soderberg

With 277 pages of helpful information, this book is a great resource for agricultural tips. There are 16 chapters: (1) the power of the industrial food system, (2) the promise of the local food system, (3) raising food, not money, (4) matching the parts of the food system to what they do best, (5) the potential of home grown greens, (6) creating healthy food gardens, (7) dynamic new leaf crops for the home garden, (8) growing multi-purpose leaf crops, (9) growing fresh greens year-round, (10) growing vertical greens, (11) growing edible cover crops, (12) preserving the leaf harvest, (13) concentrating the nutrition of green leaves, (14) recipes, (15) a new way to share information about food, (16) held in light. There are also two appendices, one for seeds and supplies and one for useful websites.

In the introduction, the author states that leaf crops produce more nutrients per square foot of growing space and per day of growing season than any other crop and they also have more nutrient per calorie than any other food. The last page of the introduction provides a chart that shows that home grown leafy vegetables provide significantly more vitamin A and iron than factory produced crops like lettuce and cabbage.

In chapter one, the author discusses some of the problems with the industrial food system. For example nearly 90 percent of all corn and soy in the US is now grown from genetically modified (GM) seed and corn and soy yields are fed to many different types of livestock in confined areas where their movement is limited. Also, the food produced by the industrial food system may be more uniform but generally has much less flavor, less variety, and less nutritional value. Ultimately the most damming judgment against the industrial food system is that it cannot be sustained. Critics state the obvious: complete dependence on non-renewable energy sources and topsoil is being eroded much faster than it can be rebuilt. And up to 98% of vegetable varieties in the US have been permanently lost in the past 100 years and the industrial diet has been blamed for sharp increases in the rates of obestiy and diabetes.

In chapter two, the author discusses the advantages of the local food movement. There is nearly unanimous agreement within the local food movement that fresh, minimally processed food is healthier than highly processed food shipped from afar. There is also widespread support within the local food movement that organically grown food is more nutritious than its conventionally grown counterpart.

After comparing the industrial food system (mass produced factory food) with the local food movement, in chapter three, the author discusses a third option - raising your own food with a humble home kitchen garden. The three out of the top four reasons for kitchen gardening are to grow food that tastes better, has better quality, and is safer. Safer gardening means we can grow and eat organic food that does not have the residue of herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides.

In chapter four, the author compared the global food production scale, industrial scale, local scale and home scale in terms of ecology, efficiency, and diversity. The home scale definitely has the highest diversity potential. Diversity is an important component of a mature ecosystem.

In chapter five, the author explains why we should grow and eat our own leafy vegetables: they are low in calories and full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. He explains that the rate of diabetes is about 20% higher in countries where high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is readily available than in countries where is was difficult to find. But the British Medical Journal found that an increase in 1.15 servings of leafy vegetables a day was associated with a 14% decrease in the incidence of type 2 diabetes (p.51).

In chapter six, the author discusses how to create healthy food gardens. An interesting observation from this chapter is that many weeds have edible leaves and they are often more nutritious than the vegetable crops that they threaten. Examples of edible leaves include: dandelion, lambsquarters, pigweed, purslane, dock, chickweed, plantain, and stinging nettles.

Chapters seven and eight provide indepth discussions of 21 spectacular leafy crops, how to extend their harvest, and how to preserve them for year-round use. These include: (1) Chaya, tree spinach, (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius, C. chayamansa) (2) Cranberry hibiscus (Hibiscus acetosella), (3) Garlic chives, chinese chives (Allium tuberosum), (4) Jute, molkhia (Corchorus olitorius), (5) Moringa, Horseradish tree, Drumstick tree, Malungay (Moringa oleifera, M. stenopetala), (6) Okinawa Spinach, Gunura (Gynura bicolor, Gynura crepiodes), (7) Taioba, Tannia, Malanga, Yautia (Xanthosoma sagittifolum), Belembe, Tannier Spinach (Xanthosoma brasiliense); Taro (Colocasia esculenta), (8) Tampala, Leaf Amaranth, Joseph's Coat (Amaranthus tricolor), (9) Toon, Chinese Mahogany, Fragrant Spring Tree, Red Toon, Chinese Cedar (Toona sinensis), (10) Vine Spinach, Malabar Spinach (Basella alba, B. rubra), (11) Walking Stick Kale (Brassica oleracea var. longata). The following additional species are discussed in chapter eight: (1) Grain Amaranth, (2) Quail Grass, (3) Roselle, (4) Sweet Potatoes, (5) Wolfberry. Another five species are discussed in chapter eleven as edible cover crops: (1) Alfalfa, (2) Austrian Winter Peas, (3) Barley, (4) Cowpeas, (5) Wheat.

Eight full color pages with several example photographs of various plants are included at the end of chapter seven.

Chapter nine discusses how to grow fresh greens year-round with greenhouses. Chapter ten discusses growning greens vertically. Chapter eleven discusses how we can grow and eat edible cover crops. Chapter twelve and thirteen discuss how to make leaf concentrate - perhaps the most nutritious food on the planet - from his own garden. Chapter fourteen includes several recipes which use leafy greens as a primary ingredient.

I highly recommend this book for anyone with an interest in the 'how to' and 'why' of backyard gardening. This ideas from this book may also help those of us who support organic gardening to know how to respond to those who think 'organic' doesn't really matter.
5.0 von 5 Sternen Guy knows what he is talking about 6. August 2015
Von Kindle Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I have enjoyed David's other books and this one is the same - great content and depth of experience.
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