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Doing Nothing: Coming to the End of the Spiritual Search (reprint) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 8. Juli 2002

4.5 von 5 Sternen 8 Kundenrezensionen

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Taschenbuch, 8. Juli 2002
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Produktbeschreibungen

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Here's some contemporary Turtle Island dzogchen-cum-Krishnamurti style of pithy, unadorned, already-present insight. As a longtime student of the nature of consciousness, Steven Harrison has danced with Sufis, sat zazen with Buddhists, chanted with Hindus, met his animal guides with African and South American shamans, meditated with the sages of India and Tibet, and visited power sites, magical people, and sacred centers throughout the world. He writes: "I studied the world's philosophies and religions. I spent long periods in India and the Himilayas, searching, contemplating, being. Through the past 25 years, I have been a student and teacher of all that I have discovered. "And it was all useless... "Even though I was discovering greater and greater depths of the mind and consciousness, no experience could solve my dilemma. No matter how far I traveled, no matter how intensely I practiced, no matter what master I found, I was still the center of the experience. Every experience, no matter how profound, was collected by the "me." The problem was the collector... The very grasping for an answer, for a response, for a solution that relieved me of a burden of feeling, was the problem." "You're already there," Harrison writes. "Do nothing. Nothing is a surprisingly active place. It is there that we discover who and what we are." Doing Nothing is for spiritually interested readers who have found themselves avidly following practices that have not fundamentally changed their lives: new therapists, ancient meditations, exotic spiritual practices. It's about discovering life directly for ourselves, about being here now. -- Branches of Light: News and Reviews from Banyen Books & Sound; Spring/Summer 2008

Go beyond therapists, gurus, gods, and techniques, he tells us, to investigate our true nature in silence. Harrison s uncompromising voice is a welcome companion on our journey toward being fully human. --Yoga Journal

Discard your ideologies and dogmas, your gurus and ritual, argues Harrison in this caustic exploration of our psycho spiritual obsessions. The solution lies in not seeking a solution. --Utne Reader

A persuasive argument for stopping the perennial search for enlightenment. --New Age Journal

In his lively introduction, Harrison tells us how he 'left the security of an Ivy League university...and sought out every mystic, seer, and magician I could find.' He spent 'long periods in India and the Himalayas searching, contemplating, being, ' and finally finding after years of frustration that 'it was all useless.' Then, in a calm moment of self-enquiry, he discovered that it was him as a seeker that was causing his discord. He saw that the 'very grasping for an answer' was taking him away from any marginal peace that he may have been occasionally experiencing. Shortly thereafter, Harrison's apparent 'me' passed into 'the vastness, the magic' that was his own, ever-present awareness. In this handsome and penetrating collection of 20-plus essays, Harrison speaks passionately about various aspects of that vastness. The chapters include The Collapse of Self, Language and Reality, The Crisis of Change, Teachers: Authority, Fascism, and Love, The Nature of Thought, and Health, Disease, and Aging. The chapter entitled The Myth of Enlightenment deserves an extended quote. The slashes are meant to indicate a new paragraph in the original text: 'We will spend a great deal of time looking for this enlightenment. But looking is useless, because it is not there./We can sit on cushions facing walls, dance in ecstasy, pray, chant. We can travel the world looking for this enlightenment. We can find the greatest of gurus and the most secret doctrines. It is useless.../Enlightenment is a myth because the self is a myth.' The author has also penned the very fine What's Next After Now?: Post-Spirituality and the Creative Life (Sentient Publications, 2005). For Harrison, the expression 'post-spirituality' points (and justly so) to presence itself. And once that presence is recognized, you see how clear and creative you life can truly be.--Rodney Stevens "Nonduality Highlights ""

Written in disarmingly unpretentious style, this book is a profound inquiry into the nature of humanity.--Dr. Thomas Szasz, author of The Myth of Mental Illness -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe.

Synopsis

This book is for those who have found themselves religiously following practices that have not fundamentally changed their lives: new therapies, ancient meditations, exotic religions, or old-time religion. It encourages them to find the truths of life through the simple act of stopping the search. What do you do after you have tried everything to find enlightenment or happiness? "As it turns out", writes Steve Harrison, "nothing is a surprisingly active place, but it is here that we discover who and what we are". -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe.

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Von Ein Kunde am 17. März 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This is really quite a fine book. There isn't a wasted word and the message of the book is clear. I was surprised to find this book after nearly giving up on the possibility that there was anything of substance being published in the spirituality genre. I highly recommend Doing Nothing.
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In this book author Steven Harrison focuses on an aspect of the "journey" that is hardly ever mentioned in this age of feel-good spirituality--that is, the action of most seekers is one of grasping. He suggests that instead of chasing after this or that "experience," we work at removing the ego from center-stage. Once we do that, the spiritual journey is done, because we find ourselves already in a highly spiritual state.
I can't disagree with his ideas here, however, he doesn't really explain well enough (for my purposes) HOW one does the work of getting the ego to budge from center stage (the book Shadow Dance by David Richo does deal thoroughly with this topic). His musings on the relationship of ego to consciousness and our daily lives are written in a way which is highly abstract and cerebral. For instance, "Integration can communicate with, interact with the projected thought-reality. It inherently commnicates because integration includes the space within which this thought-reality arises." OK, the whole book is not written that densely, but much of it is. This sort of prose is hard to sink your teeth into and digest in a way that changes your actions in the world. I now see why Jesus spoke in parables and metaphors--he employed simple, concrete terms, and it was the very simplicity of the images which allowed them to act as psychic catalysts ("the Kingdom of Heaven is like a mustard seed"). Harrison does include some little teaching stories in his book, and I savored them much as I once did an iced cola after driving across the Mohave desert with no air-conditioning. Regardless of the language, however, I think there are some important ideas in this book which make it worth reading, and I also believe the author has paid the personal dues necessary to be a teacher.
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Steven Harrisons book is important for anyone on a a religious quest. It is especially important for those who are studying Buddhism. The book fits very well with "Buddhism Plain and Simple" by Steve Hagen and with "The Meaning of Mind" by Thomas Szasz. (Though I suspect Dr Szasz might object to having his work placed in the Eastern Religions category it is helpful to those who are wrestling with the issue "what is mind".) Mr Harrisons book also fits well with Batchelors "Buddhism Without Beliefs". This book must be read carefully. It's central message (on my interpretation) is the central message of Buddhism; once you abandon the "self" the quest is over. This doesn't mean one can quit the deep spiritual life; it simply means, as Gautama the Buddha is reputed to have said, once you reach the other shore of "enlightenment" you no longer need the raft that took you there. This is a wonderful book. Seekers of all kinds will like it. Buddhists would do well to read it more than once.
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I have bookshelves literally overflowing with books written by authors who know about spiritual topics. It has been refreshing to read a book written by an author who knows. It was likely not a coincidence that I obtained this book and a copy of the Upanishads in the same week. Steven Harrison does a wonderful job of succinctly presenting timeless wisdom in a form very relevant to our modern lives.
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