Facebook Twitter Pinterest
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 1 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Digital Capitalism: Netwo... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
+ EUR 3,00 Versandkosten
Gebraucht: Gut | Details
Verkauft von reusabook
Zustand: Gebraucht: Gut
Kommentar: Product dispatched in UK within 48 hours. Thanks.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Hörprobe Wird gespielt... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Hörprobe des Audible Hörbuch-Downloads.
Mehr erfahren
Dieses Bild anzeigen

Digital Capitalism: Networking the Global Market System (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 28. Februar 2000


Alle Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 13,65
EUR 5,06 EUR 2,20
8 neu ab EUR 5,06 7 gebraucht ab EUR 2,20
click to open popover

Es wird kein Kindle Gerät benötigt. Laden Sie eine der kostenlosen Kindle Apps herunter und beginnen Sie, Kindle-Bücher auf Ihrem Smartphone, Tablet und Computer zu lesen.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Geben Sie Ihre Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.



Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

One of the great early claims of cyberculture was that the Net constituted a realm distinct from the "real world," with a life and laws all its own. This book argues strongly to the contrary. Not only is cyberspace an integral part of the real world, Dan Schiller insists, but it exists primarily to serve powerful real-world economic interests--none of which are necessarily aligned with the principles of individual freedom and equal access commonly touted as the Internet's defining values.

In Schiller's reckoning, it was neither Al Gore, the Pentagon bureaucracy, nor a subculture of long-haired hackers that brought digital networks into being. Rather, it was large corporations in the '40s and '50s that were looking to expand operations across national borders. Through big business's economic demand for sophisticated networking tools, and more importantly, through its direct political demands for deregulated digital telecommunications, these corporate interests carved out the technosocial realm we now know as cyberspace. The Internet thus stands as both symptom and fulcrum of the broader trend toward globalization that is the hallmark of the political economy of the late 20th century.

In Schiller's view, that trend is a decidedly bad thing, and he spends much of the book outlining what he sees as its deleterious effects on economic equality, media culture, and higher education. These are unabashedly anticapitalist sentiments, but whether or not you agree with them, Schiller's account of the relationship between corporations and cyberspace demands to be reckoned with. --Julian Dibbell -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

"ÝP¨rovides a useful counterweight to popular expectations about the supposedly democratic impact of the Internet."-- "Harvard Business Review"

" [P]rovides a useful counterweight to popular expectations about the supposedly democratic impact of the Internet." -- "Harvard Business Review"

& quot; [P]rovides a useful counterweight to popular expectations about the supposedly democratic impact of the Internet.& quot; -- Harvard Business Review

"[P]rovides a useful counterweight to popular expectations about the supposedly democratic impact of the Internet."--"Harvard Business Review"

Alle Produktbeschreibungen

Kundenrezensionen

Noch keine Kundenrezensionen vorhanden.
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Stern