Facebook Twitter Pinterest
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Auf Lager.
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
A Dance to the Music of T... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
+ EUR 3,00 Versandkosten
Gebraucht: Gut | Details
Verkauft von Nearfine
Zustand: Gebraucht: Gut
Kommentar: Gelesene Ausgabe in gutem Zustand. Buch kann Gebrauchsspuren aufweisen oder Bibliotheksstempel enthalten. Lieferung voraussichtlich innerhalb von 20 Tagen.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Hörprobe Wird gespielt... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Hörprobe des Audible Hörbuch-Downloads.
Mehr erfahren
Dieses Bild anzeigen

A Dance to the Music of Time: Fourth Movement (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 31. Mai 1995

5.0 von 5 Sternen 4 Kundenrezensionen

Alle Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 22,68
EUR 17,69 EUR 17,43
12 neu ab EUR 17,69 6 gebraucht ab EUR 17,43
click to open popover

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

  • A Dance to the Music of Time: Fourth Movement
  • +
  • A Dance to the Music of Time: Third Movement
  • +
  • A Dance to the Music of Time: Second Movement
Gesamtpreis: EUR 66,66
Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Es wird kein Kindle Gerät benötigt. Laden Sie eine der kostenlosen Kindle Apps herunter und beginnen Sie, Kindle-Bücher auf Ihrem Smartphone, Tablet und Computer zu lesen.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Geben Sie Ihre Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.



Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Buchrückseite

In this climactic volume of A Dance to the Music of Time, Nick Jenkins describes a world of ambition, intrigue, and dissolution. England has won the war, but now the losses, physical and moral, must be counted.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Anthony Powell's work includes Miscellaneous Verdicts and Under Review, both available from the University of Chicago Press.


Kundenrezensionen

5.0 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
4
4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Stern
0
Alle 4 Kundenrezensionen anzeigen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Top-Kundenrezensionen

Format: Taschenbuch
_A Dance to the Music of Time_ is an extremely absorbing and well-crafted novel (composed of 12 smaller novels). Its subject is the decline of the English upper classes from the First World War to about 1970, a decline seen is inevitable and probably necessary, but somehow also regrettable.
Such a description might make the novel seem stuffy, but it is not. _A Dance to the Music of Time_ is at times very funny indeed, and always interesting. always involving. It features an enormous cast of characters, and Powell has the remarkable ability to make his characters memorable with the briefest of descriptions. In addition, Powell's prose is addictive: very characteristic, idiosyncratic, and elegant.
The long novel follows the life of the narrator, Nicholas Jenkins, from his time at Eton just after World War I to retirement in the English countryside in the late '60s. But Jenkins, though the narrator, is in many ways not the most important character. The comic villain Widmerpool, a creature of pure will, and awkward malevolence, is the other fulcrum around which the novel pivots.
This final volume of the University of Chicago's beautiful Trade Paperback edition includes the last three books. _Books Do Furnish a Room_ is set shortly after World War II, when Nick Jenkins is moving in London literary circles, dealing with such characters as the doomed, eccentric, novelist X. Trapnel, his mistress Pamela Flitton Widmerpool, and of course Kenneth Widmerpool himself, clumsily but successfully trying to maximize his political influence with the help of a literary magazine. _Temporary Kings_ features Jenkins at a conference in Venice, then back in London, and introduces a couple of curious Americans, Louis Glober and Russell Gwinnett.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Taschenbuch
This volume contains the final three novels of Anthony Powell's masterpiece, A Dance to the Music of Time. Readers coming to this series for the first time should start with the first volume. Powell's work is social comedy in the tradition of Jane Austen and George Meredith. Contemporary writers with whom he is often compared include Marcel Proust and Evelyn Waugh. The 12 short novels of A Dance to the Music of Time give a panoramic picture of English upper-class social life from 1921 to 1971 that is both intensely realistic and amazingly funny. Readers either love Powell's work or can't understand what others see in it. My own opinion is that Dance is the best novel written in the twentieth century. Others share this view: A Dance to the Music of Time is #43 on the recently constructed Random House/Modern Library 100 Best Poll (of twentieth century fiction) and was made into a 4-part miniseries on British television just about a year ago.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Von Ein Kunde am 30. Oktober 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
The last three novels of this twelve-volume series take place in post-World War II England. The cast of characters has been substantially trimmed, as many of the narrator's closest friends have died, but new and unforgettable individuals emerge in the feverish literary world of London and the international conference circuit. We wait, and root for, the horrible Widmerpool to get his comeuppance, and watch as the other characters grow older, some gracefully, some less so, but always moving to the stately rhythms of time's music. Those who have read the first three-quarters of the series should definitely go on to the end--many treats are in store for you!
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Taschenbuch
C. S. Lewis once wrote that one of the greatest services that literature offers is the opportunity to experience worlds and lives not our own. This is rarely more true than with Powell's magnificent series. I had come to feel that Nicholas Jenkins's friends were my friends, and by the end I felt almost as if I had experienced another life.
If one is willing to make the commitment of time, I wholeheartedly recommend this superb series. In a hundred years time, it might be the single work that I would recommend to anyone wanting to know what life in the 20th century was like.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa33d4774) von 5 Sternen 21 Rezensionen
21 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0xa34815a0) von 5 Sternen Last segments of the finest English novel of the 20th C. 14. Juli 2000
Von Richard R. Horton - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
_A Dance to the Music of Time_ is an extremely absorbing and well-crafted novel (composed of 12 smaller novels). Its subject is the decline of the English upper classes from the First World War to about 1970, a decline seen is inevitable and probably necessary, but somehow also regrettable.
Such a description might make the novel seem stuffy, but it is not. _A Dance to the Music of Time_ is at times very funny indeed, and always interesting. always involving. It features an enormous cast of characters, and Powell has the remarkable ability to make his characters memorable with the briefest of descriptions. In addition, Powell's prose is addictive: very characteristic, idiosyncratic, and elegant.
The long novel follows the life of the narrator, Nicholas Jenkins, from his time at Eton just after World War I to retirement in the English countryside in the late '60s. But Jenkins, though the narrator, is in many ways not the most important character. The comic villain Widmerpool, a creature of pure will, and awkward malevolence, is the other fulcrum around which the novel pivots.
This final volume of the University of Chicago's beautiful Trade Paperback edition includes the last three books. _Books Do Furnish a Room_ is set shortly after World War II, when Nick Jenkins is moving in London literary circles, dealing with such characters as the doomed, eccentric, novelist X. Trapnel, his mistress Pamela Flitton Widmerpool, and of course Kenneth Widmerpool himself, clumsily but successfully trying to maximize his political influence with the help of a literary magazine. _Temporary Kings_ features Jenkins at a conference in Venice, then back in London, and introduces a couple of curious Americans, Louis Glober and Russell Gwinnett. It also features the final destructive acts of the terrible Pamela Flitton's life. _Hearing Secret Harmonies_ concludes the sequence, as Jenkins rather bitterly views the radicalism of the '60s, and especially Widmerpool's usual attempts at ingratiating himself with the latest fads in power. The novel closes with a remarkable vision of Widmerpool's end, oddly, bitterly echoing his first appearance.
A great, great, series of novels. Incomparable.
17 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0xa32e3c90) von 5 Sternen The worst thing about it is that it came to an end 10. August 1999
Von Robert Moore - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
C. S. Lewis once wrote that one of the greatest services that literature offers is the opportunity to experience worlds and lives not our own. This is rarely more true than with Powell's magnificent series. I had come to feel that Nicholas Jenkins's friends were my friends, and by the end I felt almost as if I had experienced another life.
If one is willing to make the commitment of time, I wholeheartedly recommend this superb series. In a hundred years time, it might be the single work that I would recommend to anyone wanting to know what life in the 20th century was like.
12 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0xa32edf30) von 5 Sternen Final steps of the "Dance' 30. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
The last three novels of this twelve-volume series take place in post-World War II England. The cast of characters has been substantially trimmed, as many of the narrator's closest friends have died, but new and unforgettable individuals emerge in the feverish literary world of London and the international conference circuit. We wait, and root for, the horrible Widmerpool to get his comeuppance, and watch as the other characters grow older, some gracefully, some less so, but always moving to the stately rhythms of time's music. Those who have read the first three-quarters of the series should definitely go on to the end--many treats are in store for you!
9 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0xa32f00c0) von 5 Sternen Now is the Winter of Our Discontent 15. Mai 2008
Von Stephanie De Pue - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
To arrive at the 4th movement of 20th Century British author Anthony Powell's "A Dance to the Music of Time," is, of course, to arrive at the season of winter, as we can see from the front of the soft-cover volume, a reprint of the painting by the 16th century French artist Nicolas Poussin, from which title Powell's masterwork, initially a 12-book series, takes its own. The series'1st movement, chronicling the schooldays of Powell's narrator, Nick Jenkins, was spring; the second movement, chronicling the palmy young adulthood in London of the narrator, his friends and acquaintances, was summer. World War II was fall. We now arrive at winter, melancholy; discontented, to quote Shakespeare's Richard III; and shot through with death. Powell's language is frequently more Latinate and pompous than in his earlier books; his plots and characters are less dense, and less funny. Our narrator, Jenkins, becomes less an actor in the tale than a bystander; the books read almost as a prolonged afterword as loose ends are tied up.

"Books Do Furnish a Room," first in the final trilogy, is set in the immediate post-war years of the late 1940's. Mention is made of the many people Jenkins knew who were lost in the war: his closest friends from schooldays, Peter Templer and Charles Stringham; his friend from young London salad days, Barnby. Several of his wife Isobel's many siblings have also been lost: as well as her aunt Molly Jeavons. Our narrator Jenkins is working on a study of Robert Burton, sixteenth-century author of The Essential Anatomy of Melancholy (Dover Books on Literature & Drama), and the mood is melancholy indeed. Mention is made of the difficulty and expense of getting clothing ration coupons, flowers, alcoholic beverages, gas. "Books Do Furnish a Room" is the nickname of a literary compere of Jenkins'; but he does not dominate this volume. Instead, we see quite a lot of Kenneth Widmerpool, the boys'bete noir from schooldays, and the woman he's married, Charles Stringham's universally-acknowledged to be difficult niece, Pamela Flitton. However, the book largely centers on X.Trapnel, mysterious author, whom I've always thought was based on the mysterious real-life 20th century German-American writer B. Traven, author of the 1927 novel The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, among other works - it was made into a famous movie starring Humphrey Bogart and Walter Huston, directed by Huston's famous son John: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (Two-Disc Special Edition). And then, of course, there's Trevanian, pen named author of The Eiger Sanction: A Novel; also made into a well-known movie, starring Clint Eastwood:The Eiger Sanction.

The second book, "Temporary Kings," centers on an international literary convention in Venice. We meet some new characters, principally American academic Russell Gwinnett. But the action really centers on Lord Widmerpool, as he has been named a life peer, and his wife, Lady Pamela. More of Jenkins' friends and relations are lost.

In "Hearing Secret Harmonies," the last book, set in the 1960's, we meet and will see a lot of one Scorpio Murtlock, youthful guru extraordinaire and leader of his own cult. But once again, Widmerpool, now Lord Widmerpool, chancellor of a red-brick university, will dominate, as he is first caught up in the student unrest that characterized that long-gone era; and then delivers himself and his goods to Murtlock. And yet more of Jenkins' friends, relations, and acquaintances are lost.

It's rather a glum volume, all told, and not nearly as entertaining as its brilliant predecessors. But if, you've read your way through this lengthy series, and,like some of us, you want to know what happened then --- well, you might as well read it.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0xa32f0414) von 5 Sternen This last quarter of the Dance is of lesser quality than the first three 29. Mai 2011
Von Christopher Culver - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
After a hundreds of pages dealing just with World War II, Anthony Powell brings us through the postwar decades with the last three novels of "A Dance to the Music of Time", which tracks Nicholas Jenkins and his social circle across an enormous breadth of 20th-century Britain.

BOOKS DO FURNISH A ROOM, the tenth novel, opens in the winter of 1945/46 as Britain settles back into peacetime, though not without annoying rationing and shortages. Jenkins has come to his old university for research towards a biography on Robert Burton, but soon first himself involved in the launch of a new literary magazine with distinct leftist tones. Indeed, we return to a world of shady politics left behind in the early 1930s in THE ACCEPTANCE WORLD, the third novel of the sequence, and many of the characters from those days return. Widmerpool, his political career now taking off, also comes into the picture, and his continual defence of the Soviet Union makes him a more repulsive antagonist than ever.

But beyond revisiting old friends, BOOKS DO FURNISH A ROOM introduces two new characters with very distinctive personalities. One is the novelist X. Trapnel, whose bohemianism mystifies his fellow characters and ultimately leads to his grisly ruin. The other character is Pamela Widmerpool. Though she appeared first in the previous novel, she was mostly a force of nature destroying the lives of numerous male characters offscreen. Here Jenkins talks with her on several occasions, revealing something of her as a person. As this volume was written at the end of the 1960s in a more frank era, Powell felt that his language could be a bit more coarse, and it is Pamela who utters all the profanity. The relationship between Widmerpool and his wife sometimes descends into mere soap opera, and the literary allusions, especially to Burton, get rather tiresome. Still, this is a pretty OK entry in the series.

The last two volumes are unfortunately very weak. TEMPORARY KINGS brings us over a gap of more than a decade to Venice 1958, where Jenkins is attending a literary conference. We're introduced to some American characters, but only so that Pamela Widmerpool can destroy them. This novel is tedious, the coincidences too hard to swallow, and there's a real lack of the comedy that sustained the series. HEARING SECRET HARMONIES takes place another decade on, in the late '60s, and here Powell had gotten bored with the usual trend of the "Dance" to be centred around dinner parties and inspired by real life events, so he creates an outlandish plot with a cult leader, magical powers and ritual sex.

In these last volumes, Powell tries to pare the basic plot down to Jenkins versus Widmerpool, and indeed Widmerpool's demise is what brings these multi-volume reminisces to a close. But in TEMPORARY KINGS and HEARING SECRET HARMONIES, Widmerpool is a completely different character, doing things not at all in keeping with the fellow we've long followed. Also, in the last two novels the sex really gets out of hand. In early volumes in the "Dance", the presence of a few homosexual characters added realism to the work, but Powell now reveals nearly every male character (and not a few female characters) to be homosexual and bases the plot on this, which rather reminds me of mid-century British humour's excessive reliance on cross-dressing.

I am happy that I read the Dance and I'd probably even recommend it. The bulk of the series is very entertaining, and pushing through to the end didn't require so much extra effort. Still, it's a pity that Powell couldn't keep it together in the end.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.