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The Cruel Radiance: Photography and Political Violence (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. November 2010

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“It’s not enough to say that Susie Linfield looks at photography with fresh eyes. Throughout this book—for me, most powerfully when she takes on Nazi extermination camp photographs—she sees with a mind unintimidated by fashion, shibboleths, attitude, cliche. She sees behind the pictures she looks at, to their motives, fears, ambitions, and lies. She writes through them.”—Greil Marcus--Greil Marcus

“A profoundly thoughtful account of the role of photojournalism in an irremediably violent world, Linfield’s book is as much about conscience and empathy as it is about photography. Examining images from the Spanish Civil War to Rwanda, she accepts no easy, sweeping answers. Rather, with vivid common sense and with painstaking, often abashed humanity, she guides us through the moral minefield where horror meets art, and helps us to see.”—Claudia Roth Pierpont
--Claudia Roth Pierpont

“This is a magnificent book. Susie Linfield has a good eye for the photographs and a good head for the politics. And she has the moral strength to look at these images of mutilation, death, and destruction, explain their value, and demand that we look at them, too.”—Michael Walzer
--Michael Walzer

“"The Cruel Radiance" is a brilliant, lucid, and incisive exploration of photography and political violence. It looks deeply and unsparingly at how photographers have pictured war, genocide, and atrocities, and in so doing illuminates photography’s democratic promise. By making the world present to us even when we want to look away, photographs have the potential to make us think and question together, to draw us into a community of witnesses.”—Kiku Adatto, author of "Picture Perfect: Life in the Age of the Photo Op"
--Kiku Adatto

"Extraordinary."-Christopher Knight, "Los Angeles Times"--Christopher Knight "Los Angeles Times "

"Extraordinary./i>--Christopher Knight "Los Angeles Times "

"It's not enough to say that Susie Linfield looks at photography with fresh eyes. Throughout this book--for me, most powerfully when she takes on Nazi extermination camp photographs--she sees with a mind unintimidated by fashion, shibboleths, attitude, cliche. She sees behind the pictures she looks at, to their motives, fears, ambitions, and lies. She writes through them."--Greil Marcus

"A profoundly thoughtful account of the role of photojournalism in an irremediably violent world, Linfield's book is as much about conscience and empathy as it is about photography. Examining images from the Spanish Civil War to Rwanda, she accepts no easy, sweeping answers. Rather, with vivid common sense and with painstaking, often abashed humanity, she guides us through the moral minefield where horror meets art, and helps us to see."--Claudia Roth Pierpont
--Claudia Roth Pierpont

"This is a magnificent book. Susie Linfield has a good eye for the photographs and a good head for the politics. And she has the moral strength to look at these images of mutilation, death, and destruction, explain their value, and demand that we look at them, too."
--Michael Walzer

""The Cruel Radiance" is a brilliant, lucid, and incisive exploration of photography and political violence. It looks deeply and unsparingly at how photographers have pictured war, genocide, and atrocities, and in so doing illuminates photography's democratic promise. By making the world present to us even when we want to look away, photographs have the potential to make us think and question together, to draw us into a community of witnesses."
--Kiku Adatto, author of Picture Perfect: Life in the Age of the Photo Op

""The Cruel Radiance" is a beautifully considered and unabashedly impassioned plea for the continuing moral relevance of photojournalism. . . . Linfield offers a defense of photojournalism that honors the photographers without turning them into saints or their work into sacred icons."--Jed Perl "New Republic "

""The Cruel Radiance" is a treatise on moral witness and empathic leaps: a book of brief lives--grief lives--on both sides of the camera. . . . For Linfield, criticism is a high calling. There is a scrupulous attentiveness to her looking-in and arguing-out.. . . As criticism, "The Cruel Radiance" is a work of deep distinction. It will surely become part of the history of its field."--Alex Danchev "TimesLiterary Supplement ""

It s not enough to say that Susie Linfield looks at photography with fresh eyes. Throughout this book for me, most powerfully when she takes on Nazi extermination camp photographs she sees with a mind unintimidated by fashion, shibboleths, attitude, cliche.She sees behind the pictures she looks at, to their motives, fears, ambitions, and lies.She writes through them. --Greil Marcus"

A profoundlythoughtful account of the role of photojournalism in an irremediably violent world, Linfield s book is as much about conscience and empathy as it is about photography. Examining images from the Spanish Civil War to Rwanda, she accepts no easy, sweeping answers. Rather, with vivid common sense and with painstaking, often abashed humanity, she guides us through the moral minefield where horror meets art, and helps us to see. Claudia Roth Pierpont
--Claudia Roth Pierpont"

This is a magnificent book. Susie Linfield has a good eye for the photographs and a good head for the politics. And she has the moral strength to look at these images of mutilation, death, and destruction, explain their value, and demand that we look at them, too.
--Michael Walzer"

"The Cruel Radiance" is a brilliant, lucid, and incisive exploration of photography and political violence.It looks deeply and unsparingly at how photographers have pictured war, genocide, and atrocities, and in so doing illuminates photography s democratic promise. By making the world present to us even when we want to look away, photographs have the potential to make us think and question together, to draw us into a community of witnesses.
--Kiku Adatto, author of Picture Perfect: Life in the Age of the Photo Op"

"Extraordinary." Christopher Knight, "Los Angeles Times"--Christopher Knight "Los Angeles Times ""

""TheCruel Radiance" is a treatise on moral witness and empathic leaps: a book of brief lives--grief lives--on both sides of the camera. . . . For Linfield, criticism is a high calling. There is a scrupulous attentiveness to her looking-in and arguing-out.. . . As criticism, "TheCruelRadiance" is a work of deep distinction. It will surely become part of the history of its field."--Alex Danchev "TimesLiterary Supplement ""

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Susie Linfield has been an editor for "American Film," the "Village Voice," and the "Washington""Post "and has written for a wide range of publications includingthe "Los Angeles""Times Book Review," the "New York Times," "Bookforum," the "Village Voice," "Aperture," "Dissent," and the "Nation." She is associate professor of journalism at New York University, where she directs the Cultural Reporting and Criticism program."

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Amazon.com: 4.0 von 5 Sternen 8 Rezensionen
11 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Daring to look 3. Juni 2011
Von Marcos Lopes - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Linfield's book is well done account of photographs which represent things that, usually, we don't want to look at. The author brings into discussion the very ethics of looking, gazing and staring, criticizing opinions that affirm that to look at the pain of others is participate in the intentions of perpetrators of politic crimes, specially against human rights. The principal targets of her critics are Susan Sontag, Roland Barthes, Alan Sekula and John Berger, as well as Benjamin and Krakauer. For Linfield, this authors are not essentially wrong, but we should place their writings in perspective and not make gospels of them. In reading this interesting book, we come to know that "to look or not to look" is not merely a question of transcendental ethics, but a political act regarding the suffering of human people. Linfield not only invites us to be daring to look at the pain of others, but also to look into it, its testimonies, its visual existence, and try to make of the gaze a means of amelioration of our chaotic world.
5.0 von 5 Sternen AMAZING 6. Oktober 2014
Von elin o'Hara slavick - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Amazing! While arguing against my cultural heroes - John Berger, Roland Barthes and Susan Sontag - Linfield manages to respect their genius while reinstilling belief and hope into the photographic practice of documenting this world - in all its beauty and horror. A great and painful read, post-Sontag's Regarding the Pain of Others. I plan to use this book in my Conceptual Photography Seminar at UNC, Chapel Hill.
24 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Photos missing from the Kindle Edition 5. Juli 2012
Von Jason N. Weddington - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I purchased the Kindle Edition, and was disappointed to find nearly all the photos missing. Instead there was only the text [To view this image, refer to the print version of this title.] Under this text was the caption for the original image. This is not an acceptable ebook experience. How can a book about photojournalism be missing all the photos?

I can't comment on the quality of the book itself, because I immediately returned the Kindle Edition for a refund.
1 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen light and time 14. August 2011
Von Thomas R. Belfield - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I am surprised to see that there are not more reviews of this superb book. My attention of late has been on the topics of visuality and power and what it means for us to see and how others would like us to see or make us to see. Linfield's book is brilliant in addressing just these topics and more. If you are thinking of buying this book do not hesitate.
6 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A painful but GREATLY needed book! 1. Februar 2011
Von Peter Kobs - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
What happens to the victims of genocide, torture and mass murder? Do they just disappear from memory over time or do we have a responsibility to confront their suffering? Is it "pornographic" to display photos of political violence or is it our duty to see them?

If you're in the second group, as I am, this heart-wrenching new book by photography critic Susie Linfield is a MUST read.

WARNING: The subject matter (text and photos) is deeply disturbing and not appropriate for sensitive minds or young people (under age 16).

Almost since the invention of the camera in the early 19th century, photography has been used to capture both the beautiful "nice stuff" and the ugly horrifying stuff. Photos from the American Civil War and the brutal Belgian occupation of the Congo are prime examples. In the 20th century, photos were used both by activists and perpetrators to document the very worst cases of human cruelty -- from the slaughterhouse of Ardennes in World War I to the gas chambers of Auschwitz and the execution rooms of Stalin's Russia. Sadly, this body of evidence keeps growing in our time.

As the book so aptly explains, many art critics of the post-War period (e.g., Susan Sontag) have denounced these photos calling them another form of "victimization" or even "the pornography of mass violence." We shouldn't look at those images, they say, it only makes their suffering worse.

Linfield deftly and completely demolishes that argument, both from an aesthetic standpoint and in terms of basic human morality. She uses real-world examples to demonstrate the vital role that documentary photography has played in exposing political violence over the last 150 years. Moreover, she does so while teaching us about the often difficult intersection of photography, art, journalism, history and human rights activism. Even Mark Twain makes an appearance.

I am not an art critic but I am an historian of sorts. The first chapter -- a discussion of the squabbles among specific art critics -- didn't appeal to me personally. I'd suggest reading the preface and then skipping directly to chapter 2 or 3 where the deeper narrative begins.

As I said in a letter to Linfield after reading her book: "The real value of these photographs is indeed their shock value. This is the world we live in, folks -- let's stop pretending otherwise."

BOTTOM LINE: We have a responsibility to our fellow human beings, especially vulnerable children and other victims of mass violence. The first step is to look that horror directly in the eye and say: "Never again. Never again."

Thank you, Susie Linfield, for writing this amazing work of non-fiction.
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