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The Crossing Taschenbuch – 1998

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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I eagerly read The Crossing, having thoroughly
enjoyed All the Pretty Horses (by the way, I
stayed away from All the Pretty Horses for quite
some time, just because the title reminded me
of the movie Pretty Woman, and so I thought the
book would be trite - Wrong!). In The Crossing,
Mr. McCarthy truly unleashes his mastery of the
English language, writing in poem-prose throughout. The sequence of the dying wolf is
the best description of death's ultimate relation to life that I've ever read. My feeling after reading the book was that I'd just become part of the anguish that any displaced species or people feels, in this case the wolf representing Mexico's loss of 2/3 of its country to the US and Mexico representing the loss of innocence of the protagonist and thus the loss of innocence of both the US and Mexico - both guilty of the death that must follow life, yet both still neighbors, although now Mexico is much poorer and dangerous, or is it?
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I have been a fan of Cormac McCarthy's since All the Pretty Horses, which, unfortunately, Hollywood plans to ruin. I think he is perhaps the greatest living American writer. The Crossing, like All the Pretty Horses, diverges from his earlier writing, which was more stream of consciousness type prose (every bit as beautiful, but disregarding of plot). The writing of the Crossing is more minimalistic, and I think this style works for McCarthy and his heroes, who are usually soft-spoken and reveal little about their inner thoughts. It is only through their actions that we really get to know McCarthy's characters. I agree with other reviewers that the wolf scene was very powerful-it established the theme of a time that was slipping away into a time that is-and we see that with the juxtapposition of boys riding horses with men riding pick-ups. Modernization is destroying what has connected man to animals like the wolf. But I think there are other powerful scenes as well--the preacher who learns about the true meaning of God from a godless man, the mexican girl who falls in love with Boyd and who seems so in tune with nature. To some of the Mexican bad guys, and the ones you think are bad but are actually just expressing their culture, which is different from Americans, holds different things to be of value. I like the way McCarthy writes about different cultures from his own; with a sense of wonder and respect--and sometimes brutal honesty. I think his writing is like poetry, and I bet he would make a hell of a poet, too. Anyway, I recommend The Crossing along with everything else of his I've read. I'm sorry they put his passages on a high school English test, but I doubt he had any control over that.
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Format: Taschenbuch
I first came upon Cormac McCarthy during my AP English Test in the Spring of 1999 when I had to do a style analysis of the prose from "The Crossing" where Billy had the dream of the she-wolf and how he imagined her running free with the dears and voles and so on. Well I after the test I hated Cormac McCarthy and after receiving my test score I hated him even more. (You do not want to know my score.) But for some unknown reasons I was fascinated with his writing style. It was so beautiful and yet hollow, like a meandering river leading to nowhere. So I bought the "The Crossing." I did not read it immediately. I read it about six months later. At first it was slow but afterward the text became hypnotic and it coerced my mind into a world of haunting beauty and wanton loneliness. It revealed loneliness in you. Is that possible? Coming to the part near the end of Part I and also to where I had to do a style analysis of I found that part to be the most beautiful and incredible moving text I have ever read because the text was rich and it made you like you were Billy and that the someplace you have been or dreamed of before you cannot revisit again. It was simple heart breaking to hear how the words describe how Billy imagined, "Where she ran the cries of the coyotes clapped shut as if a door had closed upon them and all was fear and marvel." The she-wolf to me then seems to be symbolic of the mankind lost or forgotten or dying in certain time and a certain place (remember what Billy thought when he tasted her blood).
After reading this desolately beautiful novel, I read "All the Pretty Houses" and then "Cities of the Plain." However "The Crossing" is in my opinion the best in the trilogy because. . . . .
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Format: Taschenbuch
Once again Cormac McCarthy uses simple people and events to tell a story of all mankind and the world we take for granted.
The protagonist, Billy, hearing the echoes from long dead wolves that once roamed free, decides after capturing the she wolf that has been killing his father's cattle, that he will not add one more to the dead. So he decides to return her to her homeland and supposedly, safety. But that land has vanished. As all lands and creations, natural and man made, eventually must. That sense of vanishing lands, and lives, is the heart of this story.
Look at the way the fates of the wolf, then Billy's parents, then the Indians Billy and Boyd discover on their journey, then finally Boyd are all mirrors of what has gone before. The story of the wolf, trying to scratch out a living in a confusing world where nothing that is here today will be the same tomorrow, is beautifully echoed in Boyd's story. The three forms that Boyd takes in the narrative, ending with his poignant return from Mexico, hint that man's fate and the fate of the nature that he destroys - without thinking - every day, are ultimately the same.
McCarthy, like other great American writers, (Melville, Faulker, Toni Morrison) is not merely a writer but a prophet. A reminder that in a world of false realities there is still room for the purest (and rarest) of all blessings. The truth.
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