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Couscous Beat

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4 von 5 Sternen 2 Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com

Preis: EUR 15,68 Kostenlose Lieferung ab EUR 29 (Bücher immer versandkostenfrei). Details
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Audio-CD, 17. Februar 2000
"Bitte wiederholen"
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Hinweise und Aktionen

Titelverzeichnis

Disk: 1

  1. N'sel fik
  2. Ah'la Jarah
  3. Ya waladi
  4. Sabreh
  5. Diri Kitabri
  6. Caravan II Baghdad
  7. Saif Albatter
  8. Lala habibi ouah
  9. Ana melit ana melit
  10. J'en ai marre
  11. Ya rayah
  12. Mazali maak N'kassi
  13. Zaabli ou tmili

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Couscous ist ein arabisches Gericht, dessen Grießklöschen-Basis immer wieder mit neuen Varianten schmackhaft zubereitet wird. Ähnlich ist das mit der Popmusik in Nordafrika. Die urbanen Klänge von heute berufen sich auf Traditionen, die bis in die 40er Jahre des 20. Jahrhunderts zurück reichen, statten diese aber mit modernen Trends aus und bewahren sich zugleich ihre Eigenständigkeit.

Couscous Beat stellt alte Matadoren vor, vor denen Jungstars wie Rachid Taha heute in die Knie gehen, und bietet zugleich eine Übersicht über die jungen Wilden, die in Marokko und Algerien gefeiert werden. Ein paar nubische Sprengsel aus dem ägyptisch-sudanesischen Raum sind auch dabei. Zum Beispiel der alte Ali Hassan Kuban, der traditionelle Weisen mit funky Sachen aufpeppt. Die Facetten des Rai, der algerischen Rebellen-Musik, lotet die Compilation aus, ohne die in unseren Breiten bekannten Superstars zu bemühen. Wussten Sie, wer der Vater und Modernisierer des Rai ist? Bellemou Messaoud erhebt diesen Anspruch, stellt sich hier kraftvoll vor und präsentiert einige Jünger und die Dame Fadela, vor deren faszinierender Stimme es kein Entrinnen gibt. Starke Töne auch bei Najaat Aatabou. Die Sängerin aus der marokkanischen Atlas-Region hat ihre Kehle inzwischen millionenfach versilbert; die nicht nur männlichen Fans liegen ihr zu Füßen. Mit einem Album wie diesem lassen sich mehr als 1001 Nacht genießen. --Uli Lemke

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Amazon.com: 4.0 von 5 Sternen 2 Rezensionen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Someone should review this great North African compilation 2. November 2004
Von Geoff Bale - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It occasionally rankles to find that a great CD has gone unreviewed in the Amazon pages. I have rated this CD at four stars, but only because there is no option to confer four and a half stars. Couscous Beat is my favourite compilation of Pan-North African popular music. Maybe you are uncertain whether to buy it as - like me - you have been familiar with several of its tracks for years on must-own albums. Possibly you are wondering whether songs from a trans-continental assortment of countries will properly flow as a compilation. As if to confront such concerns head on, the CD kicks off with a triumvirate of tracks from essential 80's-early 90's albums: "N'sel Fik" from You Are Mine by Chaba Fadela (Algeria), "Ah'la Jarah" from the self-titled album by Abdel Aziz El Mubarak (Sudan), and "Ya Waladi" from Walk Like A Nubian by Ali Hassan Kuban (Nubia) - though Kuban's signature album is actually: From Nubia to Cairo. N'sel Fik has already been used as an opener for various Rai compilations, and seemed like it would be a hackneyed choice. However, N'sel Fik is also, as Robert Christgau said, one of the greatest singles of its decade, and the ensuing tracks on this compilation not only maintain the pace and rhythmic variety, they actually seem to create a varied but of-a-piece musical atlas around the great single's artificially-echoed vocal duelling, authentically Maghrebi eruptions of cheap synthesizer over steady-state electric guitar/programmed rhythm track/buzzing,sinuous squeezebox (?) accompaniment, and inscrutably intense emotion. Inscrutable, that is, to non-speakers of Algerian Arabic. Actually, it is cheating a little to call this a Pan-North African compilation. 10 of the 13 tracks are from Algeria and Morocco, and the three catchy horns-plus-percussion tracks that follow N'sel Fik all originate on the banks of the upper Nile. Nevertheless, there is a unity which comes from modernisations that all mess with styles of music older, more acoustic, and perhaps of wider currency than the narrow techno Rai to which they have a family relationship. These styles of music include Arabic, Berber, Gnawa, and Western - especially Spanish - traditions. The only other unalloyed Rai track on the CD is by Bellemou Messaoud, whose modernisation of Rai included the addition of the trumpet. At the non-Western end of the spectrum is the totemic pre-Rai song "Ya Rayah", in its original version by Dahmane El Harrachi (recently a highlight of the historical 2 CD compilation: Tresors de la Musique Algerienne/Treasures of Algerian Music). Couscous Beat also includes Nass El Ghiwane's modernisation of Gnawa music, and closes with another duet, this time a "traditional song from the Arabo-Andalucian era" w/piano accompaniment. I hope I have sold interested beginners on this compilation, but if the wizened completists who own all the above-mentioned albums still balk, I will only add that this CD is a congenial way for them to get their hands on the reputedly feminist "J'en Ai Marre" (Sick of It) by Najat Aatabou. That track is mentioned in the notes to - but is not included on - her hard-rocking Arabo-Berber CD: The Voice of the Atlas (the best place to acquaint yourself with Aatabou's banshee-wail-over-harsh bendir-and-oud-plus-lush-Arabic-strings). Incredibly, nobody has reviewed The Voice of the Atlas either. Where is everybody?
4.0 von 5 Sternen Someone should review this great North African compilation 27. Oktober 2004
Von Geoff Bale - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It occasionally rankles to find that a great CD has gone unreviewed in the Amazon pages. I have rated this CD at four stars, but only because there is no option to confer four and a half stars. Couscous Beat is my favourite compilation of Pan-North African popular music. Maybe you are uncertain whether to buy it as - like me - you have been familiar with several of its tracks for years on must-own albums. Possibly you are wondering whether songs from a trans-continental assortment of countries will properly flow as a compilation. As if to confront such concerns head on, the CD kicks off with a triumvirate of tracks from essential 80's-early 90's albums: "N'sel Fik" from You Are Mine by Chaba Fadela (Algeria), "Ah'la Jarah" from the self-titled album by Abdel Aziz El Mubarak (Sudan), and "Ya Waladi" from Walk Like A Nubian by Ali Hassan Kuban (Nubia) - though Kuban's signature album is actually: From Nubia to Cairo. N'sel Fik has already been used as an opener for various Rai compilations, and seemed like it would be a hackneyed choice. However, N'sel Fik is also, as Robert Christgau said, one of the greatest singles of its decade, and the ensuing tracks on this compilation not only maintain the pace and rhythmic variety, they actually seem to create a varied but of-a-piece musical atlas around the great single's artificially-echoed vocal duelling, authentically Maghrebi eruptions of cheap synthesizer over steady-state electric guitar/programmed rhythm track/buzzing,sinuous squeezebox (?) accompaniment, and inscrutably intense emotion. Inscrutable, that is, to non-speakers of Algerian Arabic. Actually, it is cheating a little to call this a Pan-North African compilation. 10 of the 13 tracks are from Algeria and Morocco, and the three catchy horns-plus-percussion tracks that follow N'sel Fik all originate on the banks of the upper Nile. Nevertheless, there is a unity which comes from modernisations that all mess with styles of music older, more acoustic, and perhaps of wider currency than the narrow techno Rai to which they have a family relationship. These styles of music include Arabic, Berber, Gnawa, and Western - especially Spanish - traditions. The only other unalloyed Rai track on the CD is by Bellemou Messaoud, whose modernisation of Rai included the addition of the trumpet. At the non-Western end of the spectrum is the totemic pre-Rai song "Ya Rayah", in its original version by Dahmane El Harrachi (recently a highlight of the historical 2 CD compilation: Tresors de la Musique Algerienne/Treasures of Algerian Music). Couscous Beat also includes Nass El Ghiwane's modernisation of Gnawa music, and closes with another duet, this time a "traditional song from the Arabo-Andalucian era" w/piano accompaniment. I hope I have sold interested beginners on this compilation, but if the wizened completists who own all the above-mentioned albums still balk, I will only add that this CD is a congenial way for them to get their hands on the reputedly feminist "J'en Ai Marre" (Sick of It) by Najat Aatabou. That track is mentioned in the notes to - but is not included on - her hard-rocking Arabo-Berber CD: The Voice of the Atlas (the best place to acquaint yourself with Aatabou's banshee-wail-over-harsh bendir-and-oud-plus-lush-Arabic-strings). Incredibly, nobody has reviewed The Voice of the Atlas either. Where is everybody?
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