Facebook Twitter Pinterest

Jetzt streamen
Streamen mit Unlimited
Jetzt 30-Tage-Probemitgliedschaft starten
Unlimited-Kunden erhalten unbegrenzten Zugriff auf mehr als 40 Millionen Songs, Hunderte Playlists und ihr ganz persönliches Radio. Weitere Informationen
Ihr Amazon Music-Konto ist derzeit nicht mit diesem Land verknüpft. Um Prime Music zu nutzen, gehen Sie bitte in Ihre Musikbibliothek und übertragen Sie Ihr Konto auf Amazon.de (DE).

  
+ EUR 3,00 Versandkosten
Gebraucht: Sehr gut | Details
Verkauft von stw9999
Zustand: Gebraucht: Sehr gut
Kommentar: Versand aus Deutschland, keine Umwege über das Ausland etc. - auf Lager, wird sofort verschickt.
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Bei Amazon verkaufen
Jetzt herunterladen
Kaufen Sie das MP3-Album für EUR 8,99

New Colours of Piccolo Trumpet

4 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
0
4 Sterne
1
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Stern
0
4 von 5 Sternen 1 Kundenrezension

Preis: EUR 10,93 Kostenlose Lieferung ab EUR 29 (Bücher immer versandkostenfrei). Details
Alle Preisangaben inkl. USt
Alle 2 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Audio-CD, 30. Juli 2013
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 10,93
EUR 1,99 EUR 2,00
Nur noch 1 vorrätig – bestellen Sie bald.
Verkauf durch positivenoise und Versand durch Amazon. Für weitere Informationen, Impressum, AGB und Widerrufsrecht klicken Sie bitte auf den Verkäufernamen. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
9 neu ab EUR 1,99 2 gebraucht ab EUR 2,00

Hinweise und Aktionen


Produktinformation

  • Komponist: Fasch, Stockhausen, Mozart
  • Audio CD (30. Juli 2013)
  • Anzahl Disks/Tonträger: 1
  • Label: Plg Classics (Warner)
  • Spieldauer: 61 Minuten
  • ASIN: B00CQE7C72
  • Weitere Ausgaben: Audio CD
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: Schreiben Sie die erste Bewertung
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 179.672 in Musik-CDs & Vinyl (Siehe Top 100 in Musik-CDs & Vinyl)
  • Möchten Sie die uns über einen günstigeren Preis informieren?
    Wenn Sie dieses Produkt verkaufen, möchten Sie über Seller Support Updates vorschlagen?

  • Dieses Album probehören Künstler - Künstler (Hörprobe)
1
30
0:34
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
2
30
2:04
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
3
30
1:32
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
4
30
2:53
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
5
30
3:31
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
6
30
0:32
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
7
30
1:16
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
8
30
1:09
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
9
30
2:16
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
10
30
2:16
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
11
30
2:56
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
12
30
3:05
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
13
30
2:02
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
14
30
5:08
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
15
30
8:13
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
16
30
5:25
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
17
30
4:11
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
18
30
4:48
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
19
30
3:25
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
20
30
2:35
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 
21
30
0:51
Jetzt anhören Kaufen: EUR 1,29
 

Kundenrezensionen

Es gibt noch keine Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.de
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Stern

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.0 von 5 Sternen 1 Rezension
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Not really what I expected! 1. Oktober 2013
Von Dr. Christopher Coleman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This disc is from Markus Stockhausen, called New Colours of Piccolo Trumpet, and if that made you think it would be a CD of contemporary trumpet music, you can be forgiven. Markus Stockhausen is the son of the notoriously ultra-modern composer Karlheinz Stockhausen who fascinated musicians from Pierre Boulez to the Beatles, but whose avante-garde music leaves traditionalists infuriated. Markus has gained acclaim as a trumpeter primarily specializing in jazz and free improvisation. While there is a small percentage of this CD that is devoted to the latter, the great majority of the music is traditionally tonal and melodic. Of these tonal pieces, only Bernhard Krol's is at all contemporary, and that chronologically, not stylistically. Krol was a horn player in two top-notch German orchestras, and his Variations on Bach's Magnificat is eight short movements that won't frighten any conservative listener--personally I'm reminded of the musical language of Benjamin Britten. The other major works on the disc are a concerto by Wolfgang Amadeus's father, Leopold Mozart, who apparently had a penchant for 2 movement concerti; a concerto grosso for trumpet, 2 oboes, and strings by baroque composer Johann Friedrich Fasch, and J. S. Bach's Brandenburg Concerto #2 for trumpet, oboe, flute, violin and strings. These last two works are an especially nice complement, as the Fasch--in the first movement particularly--seems almost a re-interpretation of the ideas of Bach's more well-known concerto grosso. The resemblances are striking, and it's a pity that Fasch's compositions are almost entirely unknown. Marcus Stockhausen is a fine trumpeter with a clear, brilliant and well-centered sound. The piccolo trumpet, being much smaller, doesn't allow for the depth of tone of the regular trumpet, but then, in these pieces that's not called for at all. There seems to be quite a bit of spaciousness to the recording in general--whether that is because the CD was in a particularly live hall or echo was added later I don't know. I suspect the latter, and it was slightly distracting to me but not overly. I very much enjoyed the four traditional works and appreciated being introduced to pieces and composers I had not known before.

But wandering in and among these compositions are a series of free improvisations by Stockhausen and the orchestra. I was reminded of the Promenade movement from Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, which keeps returning in altered guises as the listener moves through the exhibition. Stockhausen's improvisations are meant as a sort of alienated contemporary commentary on the pieces they precede--he labels them "Wanderer" and the program notes are full of rather pretentious sounding explanations such as "the Wanderer passages are more than a mere transition...more than the mystical-mythological birth of a major chord..." and later Stockhausen "documents the lost (tonal) innocence of the 20th century. The only way we can now approach the past is not by misguided exaltation but only by the awareness of distance and foreignness." It's ironic, then, that most listeners will surely feel that it is the improvisations themselves that are most foreign and distant. As a composer myself, I won't easily discard the unconventional--I've done quite a lot of group improvisation for over 20 years, in fact. But I found these improvisations rather uneven--actively disliking the very brief prelude (basically crowd noises and tuning up, not really an improvisation at all), finding most of them indifferent (very typical of the genre; it is surprisingly difficult to make group improvisations sound unique), and quite enjoying the introduction to Mozart' concerto, Wanderer II. I'm going to recommend this disc, as there is much to enjoy, but with the qualification that most listeners will probably want to skip the improvisations altogether.
Ist diese Rezension hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.