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The Codebreakers: The Comprehensive History of Secret Communication from Ancient Times to the Internet (English Edition) von [Kahn, David]
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The Codebreakers: The Comprehensive History of Secret Communication from Ancient Times to the Internet (English Edition) Kindle Edition

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

"Few false ideas have more firmly gripped the minds of so many intelligent men than the one that, if they just tried, they could invent a cipher that no one could break," writes David Kahn in this massive (almost 1,200 pages) volume. Most of The Codebreakers focuses on the 20th century, especially World War II. But its reach is long. Kahn traces cryptology's origins to the advent of writing. It seems that as soon as people learned how to record their thoughts, they tried to figure out ways of keeping them hidden. Kahn covers everything from the theory of ciphering to the search for "messages" from outer space. He concludes with a few thoughts about encryption on the Internet.

Amazon.com

"Few false ideas have more firmly gripped the minds of so many intelligent men than the one that, if they just tried, they could invent a cipher that no one could break," writes David Kahn in this massive (almost 1,200 pages) volume. Most of The Codebreakers focuses on the 20th century, especially World War II. But its reach is long. Kahn traces cryptology's origins to the advent of writing. It seems that as soon as people learned how to record their thoughts, they tried to figure out ways of keeping them hidden. Kahn covers everything from the theory of ciphering to the search for "messages" from outer space. He concludes with a few thoughts about encryption on the Internet.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 17366 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 1200 Seiten
  • Verlag: Scribner; Auflage: Rev Sub (5. Dezember 1996)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B001D201IK
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Nicht aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.9 von 5 Sternen 13 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #316.050 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Kundenrezensionen

Top-Kundenrezensionen

Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I first came across "The Codebreakers" in the original edition, published in the 1960s. It was a massive read, and one which I never finished in one sitting; however, a love of history, the romance of espionage and the fascination of working with mysterious information kept me going. It is a pleasure to see the book has been reissued.
Kahn does not create a textbook for the serious cryptologist; such a work would be more mathematical in approach. What he does is give, from a layman's view, a good mid-level history of the art/science of cryptology. The first chapter, covering the cryptanalytic events of Pearl Harbor, brings you in; then he goes over the history of secret writing from the days of Egyptian hieroglyphics to roughly the present day. Interesting areas include the discussion of the European "black chambers" of the 1600s and 1700s, a good talk about how rumrunners in the Prohibition days used complex code/cipher combinations to thwart the Noble Experiment, and a highly entertaining chapter on the "ciphers" that proved Francis Bacon wrote Shakespeare's works.
The updated edition falls short in its attempt at updating, which is why I don't give another star to the book. The discussion of cryptography in the world of the Internet is far too thin to satisfy. This, of course, could be a function of the beast; the Internet and electronic cryptology changes faster than any book could keep up with. In addition, information on the Enigma and other areas of World War II cryptology, declassified since the previous edition, could have been added to increase understanding of this critical time. However, the remaining "classic" text is still excellent, and has served as the layman's reference on cryptologic history for thirty years.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
You should DEFINITELY READ Kahn's book IF you want to know who the leading cryptographers and cryptanalysts in history were, where and when they were born, how many siblings they had, what their yearly salary was, what impact they had on history, how long they lived, what they died of etc. (I know there are many people out there who LOVE to read about such things.)
As for myself, I have no idea how much a French livre was worth in 1570, and even if I did, I couldn't care less whether a cryptanalyst's annuity then was 100 or 10000 livres. I am sorry that all these great people died, but I think whether it was because of lung cancer or pneumonia is of little relevance. High school history was bad enough, I do not need any more useless historical data, thank you very much.
What I expected from the book was that it would tell me a lot about the development of the METHODS of cryptography and cryptanalysis, describing what people tried, what worked, what didn't and why. (Including not only the algorithmic but also organizational and management issues such as key management.) If you have a similar interest, FORGET ABOUT Kahn's book. Kahn gives a decent description of the encrypting/coding methods, but this is so scattered among the irrelevant pieces of information that it is hardly worth the "mining" effort. There is HARDLY ANYTHING about the methods used to breaking the codes.
Mr. Kahn made an honest effort in researching the field (except for the chapter about the modern developments - DES and the like - that is just glued to the end of the book to make it sell better). Still, he shouldn't have poured everything he ever read into his book. Less would have been more.
The Codebreakers is reputed to be the best book on the history of cryptography. Apart from the content, I found the style only so-so. I wonder how poorly written the other books are...
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Von Ein Kunde am 4. Juni 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I highly recommend this book. It is an incredibly thorough and complete description of cryptology history. I disagree with some previous criticisms about writing style and racism. I do not find the style difficult in itself, there are maybe too much details given on every historical bits... but this may as well be appraised! I cannot find any racism in Chapter 1, describing the US deciphering efforts of the japanese exchanges just before Pearl Harbor. There are hints of the US (allied actually) superiority in cryptography, but this is a plain historical fact. There is a criticism of 1940's Japan, but I cannot find this objectionnable... (the same is true about Nazi Germany). I could find nothing in the book against Japanese people or today's Japan...
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
The 1967 edition of this book is and always will be a classic. What a disappointment to find that this new edition offers such a poor updating of new information which has come to light over the last the 30 years. If the revelations of the 1970s about the Enigma decrypts and the Bletchley Colossus machines did not warrant at least a major chapter, what does? (They get only brief treatment in the new 15 page addendum.) Numerous other omissions come to mind. This book deserved better for its new edition
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David Kahn's newest book updates his previous work, which sits on every Cryptographer's, Cryptanalyst's, and government Special Intelligence officer's bookshelf in the entire world. If you REALLY want to how ciphers, codes, and systems are broken, Kahn is the author who tells you. Any person knowledgable in the field of Cryptology or Intelligence will tell you that Kahn' book has never been equalled. It is known as "The Bible of Cryptology" within the field.
From early Sparta and Rome to the present day, the strengths and weaknesses of systems and devices are presented in clear, concise terms -- occassionally with a bit of levity, where appropriate. Novices in the field will find much useful -- and highly interesting -- information. Professionals always find reminders of the fallability of "unbreakable" systems.
Kahn's writing style is clear, concise, and analytical. It is never boring.
I was employed by a maker of Cryptographic equipment, and was authorized to discuss key generator and cipher system issues with the heads of national governments. A copy of "Codebreakers" was our most requested -- and welcomed gift. That speaks more eloquently than any words I might craft.
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