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Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism von [Elmore, Bartow J.]
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Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism Kindle Edition

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

..".this is a carefully researched and thoughtful history of a fascinating corporation..." "

"forceful, deeply researched book " "

Coca-Cola is one of the most powerful economic institutions of our time, but its social and ecological impacts remain understudied. Now, in the hands of a talented young historian, corporate capitalism gets the attention it deserves in a careful dissection of the material underpinnings of the world s most valuable brand. Citizen Coke will cause you to drink less and think more. --Ted Steinberg, author of Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History of Greater New York"

Citizen Coke is a brilliant analysis of Coke s empire in ecological, economic, and social terms. It allows us to see the contours of an economy based on partnerships between governments and corporations like Coca-Cola. It makes us conscious of the giant ecological footprint of the Real Thing, which impacts the real lives of real people. If you want a deeper understanding of our world today, read Citizen Coke. --Vandana Shiva, author of Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply"

A well-researched and accessible history of one of the world's most iconic brands.

Citizen Coke is a brilliant analysis of Coke's empire in ecological, economic, and social terms. It allows us to see the contours of an economy based on partnerships between governments and corporations like Coca-Cola. It makes us conscious of the giant ecological footprint of the Real Thing, which impacts the real lives of real people. If you want a deeper understanding of our world today, read Citizen Coke. --Vandana Shiva, author of Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply

A fascinating, thought-provoking approach to Coca-Cola history through the drink's primary ingredients--water, sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, coca leaf, caffeine--and the glass, plastic, and aluminum that contain them.--Mark Pendergrast, author of For God, Country & Coca-Cola

[Offers] unaccustomed perspectives on a company whose leading product is a household name around the globe... thought-provoking.--Marc Levinson

Kurzbeschreibung

"Citizen Coke demostrate[s] a complete lack of understanding about . . . the Coca-Cola system—past and present." —Ted Ryan, the Coca-Cola Company


How did Coca-Cola build a global empire by selling a low-price concoction of mostly sugar, water, and caffeine? The easy answer is advertising, but the real formula to Coke’s success was its strategy, from the start, to offload costs and risks onto suppliers, franchisees, and the government. For most of its history the company owned no bottling plants, water sources, cane- or cornfields. A lean operation, it benefited from public goods like cheap municipal water and curbside recycling programs. Its huge appetite for ingredients gave it outsized influence on suppliers and congressional committees. This was Coca-Cola capitalism.

In this new history Bartow J. Elmore explores Coke through its ingredients, showing how the company secured massive quantities of coca leaf, caffeine, sugar, and other inputs. Its growth was driven by shrewd leaders such as Asa Candler, who scaled an Atlanta soda-fountain operation into a national empire, and “boss” Robert Woodruff, who nurtured partnerships with companies like Hershey and Monsanto. These men, and the company they helped build, were seen as responsible citizens, bringing jobs and development to every corner of the globe. But as Elmore shows, Coke was usually getting the sweet end of the deal.


It continues to do so. Alongside Coke’s recent public investments in water purification infrastructure, especially in Africa, it has also built—less publicly—a rash of bottling plants in dangerously arid regions. Looking past its message of corporate citizenship, Elmore finds a strategy of relentless growth.


The costs shed by Coke have fallen on the public at large. Its annual use of many billions of gallons of water has strained an increasingly scarce global resource. Its copious servings of high-fructose corn syrup have threatened public health. Citizen Coke became a giant in a world of abundance. In a world of scarcity it is a strain on resources and all who depend on them.


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 2352 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 438 Seiten
  • Verlag: W. W. Norton & Company; Auflage: 1 (3. November 2014)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00J8R3IKK
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Nicht aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen 1 Kundenrezension
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #877.702 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
A very good insight in the history and making of the Coca Cola Company. I enjoyed reading it very much.
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Amazon.com: 4.2 von 5 Sternen 39 Rezensionen
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen illuminating and thought provoking 4. Januar 2015
Von Raluca Moldovean - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Lots of data, ideas and facts tracing the history of coca cola and also a description of customs and events throughout 19th and 20th century. The author offers a wealth of data while it tries successfully to present a balanced view of this American icon. Most people are aware of the bad effects of drinking coca cola; however the book also presents this company's impact on water use, garbage generation, producing pollution through refrigeration and transport, supporting production of corn, coffee and tea to reach unsustainable levels. I was surprised at the reach of this beverage to profoundly impact not only the human body but our entire environment. In the end I am just amazed at the considerable resources, time, and money used to produce and consume such a nefarious product! The author correctly warns that getting rid of coca cola will be extremely hard;so many people depend on the revenues generated from its sale.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen I personally enjoyed the book as an alternative history of Coca Cola 23. Oktober 2015
Von Diana m. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Bartow J. Elmore’s Citizen Coke deviates strongly from traditional academic narratives surrounding the Coca Cola empire. Intended as a counterpoint to histories of the company regarding advertising and sociological impact of brand image, Citizen Coke is an environmental history of Coca Cola. Elmore’s core argument is that the success of Coca Cola derives from an economic and ecological strategy of utilizing pre-existing networks of resource extraction to manufacture product, characterized by Elmore as “an opportunistic, in-and-out strategy for making money” (Elmore 10). Each chapter follows a single ingredient in Coca Cola, including the history of tap water in the product, beginning in the soda fountains of the American South where raw syrup was mixed in person to create the beverage, up to Coke’s dealings with Monsanto. I personally enjoyed the book as an alternative history of Coca Cola, when as Americans our knowledge of the “Coca Cola country” usually connects to Rockwell’s pictures, Life magazine ads, and various other pop culture artifacts rather than a raw history of the product. Candidly, as the sort of person who connects more with the fluffiness of a pop culture history, there were parts of me that wanted to get at more of the social qualities of the beverage’s history. However, I loved the seediness detailed in the relationship between Monsanto and Coca Cola (especially as a Midwestern transplant), and loved the attention given to consistently illustrating the emphasis placed upon “leanness,” as Elmore describes, it in the company’s dealings to continually play up the Coca Cola capitalism the book outlines.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Elmore examines every ingredient in the beverage and explained how the company could always lower its expenses by finding cheap 23. Oktober 2015
Von Amazon Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
In Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism, Bartow Elmore examines the history of Coca-Cola from its modest beginnings until it became one of the most valuable trademarks in the world. Elmore examines every ingredient in the beverage and explained how the company could always lower its expenses by finding cheap substitutes as well as having a monopoly on the trade of some key ingredients like the coca leaf. Elmore argues that Coca cola became very successful company through marketing and outsourcing its operations to other entities. The book also analyzes the negative environmental consequences of coca cola's success. It shows how some areas ran out of water as a result of bottling plants usage of deep ground water. Also, the author suggests that Coca-Cola impacts our public health and our societies in general due to its beverages high content of sugar and other chemicals. Citizen Coke is a well written easy to read book with many details and interesting facts. I recommend this book to anyone who's interested in the history of coca cola and its secrets to success.
6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Big Soda unmasked: it's not as sweet as you think 19. Januar 2015
Von Mal Warwick - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Since my fellow citizens and I here in Berkeley recently approved a tax on sweetened soft drinks despite a multi-million dollar campaign by Big Soda — by a margin of 3-to-1, of course! — I thought it might be timely to pick up the new book about the history of the Coca-Cola company, the granddaddy of the pack in Big Soda. I was expecting standard fare in business writing — a straightforward chronology of the company from its beginnings as a cocaine-laced stimulant popular in the American South to today’s universal symbol of imperialism. But that’s not what I found. Citizen Coke by Bartow J. Elmore is much more than that, and much better.

The key to appreciating this brilliant book is its subtitle, The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism. For Elmore, the Coca-Cola Company is not just a case study in successful capitalism — for many years, its brand reigned supreme throughout the world, and it still jockeys with Apple and Google for the top spot, according to the Interbrand agency. As Elmore puts it, Coke’s is “the most-recognized brand in human history.” In his view, the company pioneered what has emerged as the most profitable approach to business in today’s world: a lean mass-marketing machine that outsources both production and distribution of virtually all its products. “Ultimately,” he writes, “Coke’s genius, its secret formula in many ways, was staying out of the business of making stuff.” That’s Coca-Cola Capitalism.

Whether or not the concept of outsourcing is original with the company is immaterial. Of course, it didn’t. But Coke successfully parlayed it into an unparalleled global phenomenon. “By the mid-twentieth century, Coke was the single largest buyer of sugar in the world, the largest global consumer of processed caffeine, the biggest commercial buyer of aluminum cans and plastic bottles in the nonalcoholic beverage industry, and a major water guzzler. Here was a company with an unmatched ecological appetite for an array of natural resources. It gorged on commodities in order to make profits.”

What’s special about Citizen Coke is its inquiry into the ecological, social, and political impact of the company and its distinctive business model. That impact was substantial in every respect. Elmore emphasizes that “the main material investments that supported the growth of company bottlers flowed not from the Coca-Cola Company or from local businessmen but from city governments. The key ingredient was water: small bottlers with limited resources depended entirely on public water systems built, managed, and operated by municipalities.” And its principal domestic shipping costs were kept low by the heavily-subsidized railroads that spanned the nation.

Citizen Coke contains nine chapters plus an introduction and an epilogue, with each chapter focusing on one critical ingredient in Coke’s success: tap water, waste tea leaves, sugar, coca leaf extract, cocoa waste, water from abroad, coffee beans, glass, aluminum, plastic, and high-fructose corn syrup.

Today’s Coca-Cola — based on a formula that is strikingly different from the original, the company’s mythology notwithstanding — is a product that consists largely of cheap municipal water plus either sugar or high-fructose corn syrup, synthetic caffeine, and a smattering of coca leaf extract. The product is a principal source of today’s obesity epidemic, a major contributor to the glut in our cities’ landfills, and, in some parts of the world (including at least a few in the United States) the cause of ever-worsening shortages of safe, drinkable water.

Elmore wrote this book as his doctoral thesis at the University of Virginia. He was a post-doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley in 2012-13. He now teaches history at the University of Alabama. He grew up drinking Coke in Atlanta, where the company is headquartered.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen COKE IS S--T RHYMES WITH IT 17. Mai 2015
Von Michael A. Podraza - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Extremely informative book on how Coke is raping the world not paying the proper amount for water usage and manipulating to use water for a non-essential product where there are actual water shortages. It gets worst: Coke connives to get tax breaks while throwing people out of work. I never drank much Coke anyway but after reading this book I'm drinking more water from the tap. Yes Coke sells bottled water too which my 91 year old father called the biggest racket out. Michigan Straight is what he drank all his life. (In Chicago we get our tap water from Lake Michigan).
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