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Auschwitz von [Rees, Laurence]
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Auschwitz Kindle Edition

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Thank God that occasionally books of the stature of Laurence Rees's superb Auschwitz: The Nazis and the "Final Solution" are published... Fascinating" (Andrew Roberts Evening Standard)

"Excellent" (Boyd Tonkin The Independent)

"Scholarly yet accessible and objective, the author rightly feeling that the facts speak for themselves." (Waterstones Books Quarterly)

"Devastating. Rees's research is impeccable and intrepid. Ultimately he does at the gut level what Hannah Arendt achieved some 40 years ago at the level of philosophy: he forces the reader to shift the Holocaust out of the realm of nightmare or Gothic horror and acknowledge it as something all too human. Scrupulous and honest, this book is utterly without illusions." (David Von Drehle Washington Post, USA)

"Well-written with striking testimonies from bystanders, perpetrators and victims. The interviews with SS men, and sundry European Fascists, are genuinely revealing, and must have been exceptionally difficult to negotiate." (Michael Burleigh Daily Telegraph)

Werbetext

The definitive history of Auschwitz

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 2709 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 400 Seiten
  • Verlag: BBC Digital; Auflage: New Ed (30. Juni 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0089WCB2G
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen 1 Kundenrezension
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #226.656 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Format: Taschenbuch
When one thinks of the labor and death camps instituted by the Nazis during World War II, the notorious concentration camp at Auschwitz comes immediately to mind. One cannot help but wonder what kind of mindset would devise such an infamy. How could Germany, a nation that was noted for its richness of culture, have devised a plan of genocide that was so far reaching and so inherently evil?
The author attempts to answer that question and succeeds in doing so brilliantly. This is a very well-written book that will appeal to those who are interested in the general human condition, as well as those interested in the holocaust itself. It is scholarly, yet, at the same time, immensely readable. This is because the author has put a very human face on the dreaded death camp of Auschwitz. The stories and experiences of more than a hundred people are integrated throughout the narrative, which delves into the historical backdrop of the Nazi political machinery and its leadership. Survivors of Auschwitz, as well as Nazi perpetrators, tell of their experiences in the hell that was known as Auschwitz, and they tell it from their own unique perspectives. The symbiosis that often existed between prisoner and prison guard is quite unsettling, as are the attendant moral and ethical issues.
The author attempts to help the reader understand how it was that the "final solution" came about. It is an unsentimental, intellectually objective, critical analysis of one of the most infamous episodes in modern history and warfare. The author carefully delineates how the Nazis developed their reprehensible strategy for global genocide, and how it came about being implemented.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x94dd8408) von 5 Sternen 107 Rezensionen
58 von 61 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x94c5d9a8) von 5 Sternen SIMPLY BRILLIANT... 16. Juli 2005
Von lawyeraau - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
When one thinks of the labor and death camps instituted by the Nazis during World War II, the notorious concentration camp at Auschwitz comes immediately to mind. One cannot help but wonder what kind of mindset would devise such an infamy. How could Germany, a nation that was noted for its richness of culture, have devised a plan of genocide that was so far reaching and so inherently evil?

The author attempts to answer that question and succeeds in doing so brilliantly. This is a very well-written book that will appeal to those who are interested in the general human condition, as well as those interested in the holocaust itself. It is scholarly, yet, at the same time, immensely readable. This is because the author has put a very human face on the dreaded death camp of Auschwitz. The stories and experiences of more than a hundred people are integrated throughout the narrative, which delves into the historical backdrop of the Nazi political machinery and its leadership. Survivors of Auschwitz, as well as Nazi perpetrators, tell of their experiences in the hell that was known as Auschwitz, and they tell it from their own unique perspectives. The symbiosis that often existed between prisoner and prison guard is quite unsettling, as are the attendant moral and ethical issues.

The author attempts to help the reader understand how it was that the "final solution" came about. It is an unsentimental, intellectually objective, critical analysis of one of the most infamous episodes in modern history and warfare. The author carefully delineates how the Nazis developed their reprehensible strategy for global genocide, and how it came about being implemented. The creation of Auschwitz was crucial to the Nazis' desire to rid itself of Europe's Jewish population but, however, that desire may not have been entirely ideologically driven. From his extensive research, the author postulates that there may have been a practical, more pragmatic component that dictated the actions of the Nazis in the final, waning days of World War II that was no less immoral than the ideological one.

This is simply a stunning and authoritative book by an author whose expertise in this area is undeniable. It is a comprehensive and insightful look at one of the most notorious death camps in the history of Nazi Germany. The author carefully explains the rise and fall of Auschwitz within the context of the Nazi mentality and ideology, as well as within the broader context of historical and military pragmatism. It is a devastating portrait, indeed, and with its sixteen pages of vintage black and white photographs, it is a book that will keep the reader riveted to its pages until the very last one is turned. Bravo!
41 von 46 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x94c60f60) von 5 Sternen Definitve Book Unveils the Horrid Significance of Auschwitz 23. Januar 2005
Von Grady Harp - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Laurence Rees is a fine scholar and a fine writer and has the courage to present an historical summary of the one of the most horror-laden atrocities of the twentieth century - the Nazi camp called Auschwitz. Even the name conjures up loathing and nausea and near disbelief that such unimaginable mass killings, human medical experimentation, torture, and genocide could have possibly been real. But without denying any of the truths well documented since the Nuremberg Trials, Rees explores the initial beginnings of the concepts for the camp and the events that lead the Third Reich to push this Polish town site into world memory.

World War I laid the seeds for the rise of German resentment for the loss of a war they felt was turned against them. At the core, in search for a causative factor, the Jews were perceived as the evil reason for Germany's losses. Not that anti-Semitism was limited to Germany: Rees wisely shows that those feelings were fairly widespread throughout the world. Yet it took the early fanatics that included Adolph Hitler to strive to purify Germany, rid the fatherland of the useless consumers of food that robbed the Germans of their rightful needs, and repatriate lost Germans to the fatherland at any cost. Rees postulates (with excellent quotations from both Nazi perpetrators and concentration camp survivors throughout this book) that the primary goal of creating concentration camps such as Auschwitz was to provide way stations for gathering non-Germans for deportation to make room for the return of 'lebensraum' for those of pure German blood.

The progress from these initial postulates to the eventual conversion of the concentration camps as places for extermination of not only Jews but also any 'outsiders' ending with the gassing and cremation of millions of human beings is the trail Rees outlines for the reader. He also uses his hundreds of interviews with camp survivors to explore the inner workings of the camps, from the hierarchy of the Capos, the survival techniques, the trading issues with the Poles outside the camps, the brothels within the camps that serviced not only the Guards but also the inmates, and the day to day mechanisms of progressive annihilation of the inmates.

This book is not easy reading: the approach is scholarly yet fascinating and the subject matter can induce waves of nausea in even the most iron-willed reader. But the book is terribly important. If our response to the Nazi genocide camps is only one-sided horror without the information as to how such camps evolved from first idea to ultimate tragedy, then we stand to see history repeat itself. We need only to look at Abu Ghraib, Sudan, and other contemporary mini-counterparts to see how feasible this line of thought is. This is a very important book and recommended to everyone who cares about the human race. Grady Harp, January 2005
27 von 31 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x94c60528) von 5 Sternen The answer to "Why"? 22. Februar 2005
Von T. Dassing - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is not for the squeemish of today's world. Aushchwitz: A New History, is just that, New. It reveals new insights regarding the phychological reasoning as to how Auschwitz and the other death camps evolved and why. The survivor's memories conveyed in this book allows the reader understand the complete brutality of what humans can do to one another when placed in humiliating and deadly conditions. As a humanist, the brutal descriptions in the book made me ill. The fact is that only 60 years ago the Nazis set back the human condition about 2500 years. Time and time again we hear "We must never forget" about what happened during the holocaust. This book answers the reasons as to why we must never forget.
27 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x94ae9150) von 5 Sternen Rambling, disorganized, incomplete 10. Oktober 2011
Von Paul - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I can't remember being more disappointed in a history book than in this one. This book is a terribly organized, rambling, stream of consciousness mush that utterly fails in its main goal: to put Auschwitz in a context (of the war, of the Holocaust, and of the Nazis).

The author is correct that the various components of the Holocaust were to some degree the Nazis' improvised solutions to self-created problems. But he seems to have been incapable of tying this together. A decision was clearly reached at some point in 1941 to exterminate the Jews, at least wherever they fell within the Nazis' dominion. But this took shape in several highly regional actions: the Einsatzgruppen were a mobile 'death squad' that acted mainly in the occupied Soviet territories, Chelmno was meant to destroy the Jews chiefly in the Warthegau, the three Operation Reinhard Camps were meant to destroy the Jews mainly in the General Government, and ultimately Auschwitz was chosen as the site to import and destroy the Jews from the rest of Europe because of its 1) access to railways, 2) its economic value as a slave labor camp kept it operating whereas this was not true of Belzec, Treblinka, etc, and 3) it had a high capacity.

But this is barely explored in the book -- that the final solution even once decided upon in 1941 didn't ever crystallize into a 'site' until around 1943 when Auschwitz seemed like the only place it could be centralized. The author unbelievably fails to note how Hoess actually traveled to Treblinka (according to his own testimony and memoirs) and chose to operate his own extermination mechanism differently. This is critical because Treblinka, Sobibor, Belzec, and Chelmno were exclusively SS operations, self-contained, unsophisticated, etc. On the other hand, Auschwitz relied on contractors and architectural firms and chemical companies (barely discussed) to build the crematoria, supply the Zyklon B, etc -- things that might be interesting to include in a history of Auschwitz, right?

Additionally, the administrative and economic structures were vastly different between the different camp systems, a subject touched on very amorphously. The Einsatzgruppen actions, fundamentally, were a joint venture between the SS and all sorts of police units (the SD / SiPO and local police units) as well as to some degree the Wehrmacht, all overseen by the RHSA. Not so for Operation Reinhard (Treblinka, Sobibor, Belzec) -- that was 100% SS principally from the T4 euthanasia program. But Auschwitz? None of the above -- this was under the direction of the WVHA, the main economic and administrative department of the SS, which was charged with slave labor contracts, plunder, and general concentration camp administration.

My point -- that Auschwitz was intimately linked with the economy of the Nazis' slave labor system at the highest administrative level -- a critical point to understanding the evolution of the Holocaust. This is why in 1942, a year that ended in the Stalingrad fiasco, 2.7 million Jews were killed in places like Treblinka, Belzec, etc, which did not integrate with the slave labor system. Virtually no one survived these camps -- those camps were basically just human disposal units. Later in the war, and particularly 1944, the Nazi state was in an entirely different military and economic situation, and having a source of routine slave labor was needed by the Nazi state. That was Auschwitz -- and that is why thousands of people survived Auschwitz, whereas fewer than 100 people total survived Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka, and Chelmno (which put together killed nearly twice as many people as Auschwitz). Yet this does not ever become clear in this book.

The author also refers to Majdanek in simple terms as a 'much lower capacity' camp. The fact of the matter is that Majdanek is the one camp in the history of the Nazis that was most similar to Auschwitz. It was a hybrid death camp and labor camp, just like Auschwitz, and it was also not particularly isolated from the world (whereas Sobibor, for instance, was out in the forests). It happened that most of the killing for which Majdanek did the slave / plunder work actually happened in the Operation Reinhard camps, but Auschwitz centralized all of this.

Another area of discussion that is all to superficially treated in the book is the role of Eichmann's office. Rees goes into it (at an extremely perfunctory level) when talking about the Hungarian action of 1944. But it happened that Eichmann was intimately involved in deportations from France, from Salonika, and numerous other places that actually matter -- Auschwitz, more than any other killing site, required "diplomatic" efforts to get its victims, including regional offices and infrastructure established by Eichmann. This material, again crucial to understanding the history of Auschwitz, is virtually missing.

The author treats the Lodz ghetto in a very strange way. He gives great emphasis to it early on, more when discussing the evolution of Chelmno than anything else, but only mentions in passing that the ghetto was liquidated in the late summer of 1944 with 65,000 Jews being sent from Lodz to Auschwitz. 65,000 -- that is around a third of the total population of this ghetto, I believe the second largest after Warsaw in all of Nazi-occupied Poland. This deserves more than superficial mention because it was in fact the final major exterminatory episode at Auschwitz -- and we are talking about a history of Auschwitz, right?

Moreover, Lodz and Auschwitz had something in common -- they were both run and managed as economic enterprises. On the other hand, Treblinka, Belzec, and Sobibor, along with all the General Government ghettos (i.e. Lublin, Warsaw, etc) were run purely by the SS as security enterprises. The management and thinking (including personally by Himmler) differed. Why isn't this discussed?

Finally, Hoess, Mengele, and Grabner weren't the only two people to work at Auschwitz. How about in this history of the camp we get to meet more of the other camp leaders, including Josef Kramer, including the leaders of the women's camp (i.e. Irma Grese), etc. Auschwitz was created by its participants, not just its facilities.

Now, what the author DOES give us is a seemingly endless litany of rambling anecdotes and mini biographies. Don't get me wrong, I come from a family full of survivors and victims, and I am all for survivor testimony. But this is done in a way that is utterly distracting from the 'mission' of the book. Furthermore, these stories are unpredictably interwoven with unrelated events elsewhere in Europe, and the chapters have no internal organization.

My final criticism: much is made of new sources, including interviews and documents held by the Soviet Union that are now available. This is complete hype -- there is NOTHING in this book that is presented as "new evidence" that I haven't read elsewhere, including Wikipedia in many cases. And the interviews the author conducts, particularly with perpetrators, are not especially insightful. You really need evidence of former Einsatzgruppen members who have no remorse? Go read "The Good Old Days" and you'll read this to the point of utter nausea. You want to see perpetrators who are full of fallacies, rationalizations, and psychological defense mechanisms? Read "Into that Darkness", or read Eichmann's testimony.

A greater challenge, one that the author doesn't take up despite his mission to present us with one of the most challenging places / times in human history -- is to show us a former Nazi who truly ever showed remorse, who took a step back and was horrified by what he'd done. Show us a Nazi with some insight. Can't do it. Albert Speer faked it -- he made liberal use of slave labor, yet somehow had no idea where it came from. Hoess's "regret" is utterly superficial, and in fact he complained that the problem with Auschwitz was not that he slaughtered millions of innocent people, but rather because it turned world opinion against Germany. Ya think? Hans Frank's apology is utterly superficial. Even Franz Suchomel, a Treblinka guard who hides nothing in talking about the camp, doesn't sit back and talk about how horrible it was (he is extensively interviewed in "Into that Darkness" and Lanzmann's "Shoah"). The thing is, you just can't find a truly remorseful interview or quote -- because I don't think anyone who really participated in this is psychologically capable of coming to terms with both its scale and their own responsibility at the same time.

Hopefully someone else will now set out to actually write a history of Auschwitz -- one that actually tells its story and puts it in both the context of time and humanity.
9 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x94ae92e8) von 5 Sternen Haunting 3. August 2006
Von Eric Hobart - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
The story of Auschwitz is often taught in today's schools as that of a concentration camp erected during the Second World War that witnessed one of the world's worst genocides - the slaughter of one million innocent Jewish souls.

Laurence Rees has written this book, Auschwitz: A New History, in part to dispel the common thought and bring the reality of what happened at this death camp to light for a new generation. Auschwitz may have been built originally as a concentration camp, but it soon became a key cog in the wheel of the "final solution" when the SS heirarchy elected to evolve it into its more sinister role as that of a death camp.

As Rees so poignantly states at the conclusion of the book - soon there will be no survivors, no living witnesses to the horrors that took place in Auschwitz. Books like this must speak for them instead.

Rees has relied largely on original research; interviews with survivors and SS members who were stationed at the camp, in order to compile this tome. His writing style is engrossing, and the stories he recounts from the victims and perpetrators are haunting indeed. This book is not for the faint of heart - the atrocities described are gut-wrenching, and the tales of escape or victories by the oppressed are cause for cheer. The book draws the reader in and never lets him/her go.

As I was reading this history of Auschwitz, which could be more accurately described as a brief history of the entire German concentration camp system, as other camps, such as Treblinka, Dachau, and Bersen-Belgen do get their fair share of attention, I could hardly put the book down. For anyone that has an interest in Holocaust studies or World War II in Europe, this book should be put on the "must read" list.
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