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Apocryphal Lorca: Translation, Parody, Kitsch von [Mayhew, Jonathan]
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Apocryphal Lorca: Translation, Parody, Kitsch Kindle Edition


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Länge: 222 Seiten Sprache: Englisch

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

The great merit of Mayhews study is his sustained effort to document and interrogate Lorca''s reception, unique among American encounters with foreign literatures in its nature and extent. For Mayhew, the American Lorca is largely an apocryphal figure, a cultural stereotype that was fully assimilated into the American idiom. Like all stereotypes, the Americanized Lorca is reductive: the poet''s life is equated with his homosexuality and his murder by Franco''s forces, and his oeuvre, whittled down to his essay Play and Theory of the Duende and a small group of poems from Gypsy Balladbook and Poet in New York, becomes indistinguishable from a romantic image of Andalusian folk song and so-called Spanish surrealism.Lawrence Venuti, Times Literary Supplement -- Lawrence Venuti "Times Literary Supplement" (10/02/2009)

Jonathan Mayhews Lorca is less the distinctive Spanish poet, whose murder in 1936 marked the beginning of the Civil War, than he is an American invention. From the 1940s to the end of the century, our poets have invoked Lorcain translation, of courseas a Romantic, exotic, radical, and, in many cases, gay iconthe poet of mystery and the duende. The Lorca myth, Mayhew argues persuasively, has enriched American lyric, but it has also been an obstacle to a more adequately grounded understanding of Spanish poetry in the 20th century. Apocryphal Lorca is revisionist criticism at its most acute.Marjorie Perloff -- Marjorie Perloff (11/24/2008)

"Jonathan Mayhew's ["Apocryphal Lorca"] belongs to a certain class of surprising books: those so obviously necessary once they appear that it apparently required a stroke of genius to come up with the idea for them." -"Hispanic Review
"



--Daniel Katz "Hispanic Review "

"The great merit of Mayhew's study is his sustained effort to document and interrogate Lorca's reception, unique among American encounters with foreign literatures in its nature and extent. For Mayhew, the American Lorca is largely an apocryphal figure, a cultural stereotype that was fully assimilated into the American idiom. Like all stereotypes, the Americanized Lorca is reductive: the poet's life is equated with his homosexuality and his murder by Franco's forces, and his oeuvre, whittled down to his essay 'Play and Theory of the Duende' and a small group of poems from Gypsy Balladbook and Poet in New York, becomes indistinguishable from a romantic image of Andalusian folk song and so-called Spanish surrealism."

--Lawrence Venuti"Times Literary Supplement" (10/02/2009)

"Apocryphal, American Lorca! Inviting us to consider how one culture reads another--how American poets read Spain through Lorca and Lorca through Spain--Jonathan Mayhew has given us an informative, thoughtful, fascinating, and often funny journey through translation, parody, and kitsch. No one could be better qualified to study Lorca's work as 'generative device' in English-language poetry and get at the mystery of how and what a poet can mean in a different cultural context."

--Christopher Maurer, Boston University (06/27/2008)

"An intriguing and invaluable study of import of Spanish deep image poetry in its domestic American mode, foregrounding problems of authenticity, translation, and imitation--and the legacy of the "Duende.""

--Mary Ann Caws, CUNY Graduate Center (11/03/2008)

"Jonathan Mayhew's Lorca is less the distinctive Spanish poet, whose murder in 1936 marked the beginning of the Civil War, than he is an American invention. From the 1940s to the end of the century, our poets have invoked Lorca--in translation, of course--as a Romantic, exotic, radical, and, in many cases, gay icon--the poet of mystery and the "duende". The Lorca myth, Mayhew argues persuasively, has enriched American lyric, but it has also been an obstacle to a more adequately grounded understanding of Spanish poetry in the 20th century. "Apocryphal Lorca" is revisionist criticism at its most acute."

--Marjorie Perloff (11/24/2008)

The great merit of Mayhew s study is his sustained effort to document and interrogate Lorca's reception, unique among American encounters with foreign literatures in its nature and extent. For Mayhew, the American Lorca is largely an apocryphal figure, a cultural stereotype that was fully assimilated into the American idiom. Like all stereotypes, the Americanized Lorca is reductive: the poet's life is equated with his homosexuality and his murder by Franco's forces, and his oeuvre, whittled down to his essay Play and Theory of the Duende and a small group of poems from Gypsy Balladbook and Poet in New York, becomes indistinguishable from a romantic image of Andalusian folk song and so-called Spanish surrealism.
--Lawrence Venuti"Times Literary Supplement" (10/02/2009)"

Apocryphal, American Lorca! Inviting us to consider how one culture reads another how American poets read Spain through Lorca and Lorca through Spain Jonathan Mayhew has given us an informative, thoughtful, fascinating, and often funny journey through translation, parody, and kitsch. No one could be better qualified to study Lorca s work as generative device in English-language poetry and get at the mystery of how and what a poet can mean in a different cultural context.
--Christopher Maurer, Boston University (06/27/2008)"

An intriguing and invaluable study of import of Spanish deep image poetry in its domestic American mode, foregrounding problems of authenticity, translation, and imitation and the legacy of the"Duende."
--Mary Ann Caws, CUNY Graduate Center (11/03/2008)"

Jonathan Mayhew s Lorca is less the distinctive Spanish poet, whose murder in 1936 marked the beginning of the Civil War, than he is an American invention. From the 1940s to the end of the century, our poets have invoked Lorca in translation, of course as a Romantic, exotic, radical, and, in many cases, gay icon the poet of mystery and the "duende." The Lorca myth, Mayhew argues persuasively, has enriched American lyric, but it has also been an obstacle to a more adequately grounded understanding of Spanish poetry in the 20th century. "Apocryphal Lorca" is revisionist criticism at its most acute.
--Marjorie Perloff (11/24/2008)"

Jonathan Mayhew s ["Apocryphal Lorca"] belongs to a certain class of surprising books: those so obviously necessary once they appear that it apparently required a stroke of genius to come up with the idea for them. "Hispanic Review
"
--Daniel Katz "Hispanic Review ""

Kurzbeschreibung



Federico García Lorca (1898–1936) had enormous impact on the generation of American poets who came of age during the cold war, from Robert Duncan and Allen Ginsberg to Robert Creeley and Jerome Rothenberg. In large numbers, these poets have not only translated his works, but written imitations, parodies, and pastiches—along with essays and critical reviews. Jonathan Mayhew’s Apocryphal Lorca is an exploration of the afterlife of this legendary Spanish writer in the poetic culture of the United States.


            The book examines how Lorca in English translation has become a specifically American poet, adapted to American cultural and ideological desiderata—one that bears little resemblance to the original corpus, or even to Lorca’s Spanish legacy. As Mayhew assesses Lorca’s considerable influence on the American literary scene of the latter half of the twentieth century, he uncovers fundamental truths about contemporary poetry, the uses and abuses of translation, and Lorca himself.




Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 2035 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 240 Seiten
  • Verlag: University of Chicago Press; Auflage: 1 (1. August 2009)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B002GKC2O4
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Nicht aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
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HASH(0x9ba7ff6c) von 5 Sternen Enhorabuena Mayhew! 26. Dezember 2009
Von Kevin Killian - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I bought this book to help me in ongoing research into Lorca's influence on US poets of the Cold War generation. It has repaid my investment many times over. Thank you, Professor Mayhew, for your invaluable guide through the myriad pathways of Lorca's influence.

Mayhew, alert as a caterpillar, knows where, when and who was borrowing from Lorca's style during a dark and dangerous period of US history, plus he has a sense of humor about how awful some of this borrowing turned out to be. If translation is a two way street, then there have been many head on collisions in the name of love. But in general, we get a measured sense of how all of a sudden many of the New Americans were talking about "duende" without really knowing what it is. I understand that I myself, for example, will also never know what it is, as that knowledge is vouchsafed only 1 in every two million US citizens. It is the one thing that most people will never be able to understand. Even in Spain they don't really get it either. I have been working with a Spanish scholar, David Menendez Alvarez, who has steered me towards the instances in which Jack Spicer translated directly from Lorca's poetry, and Menendez Alvarez advised me, why not skip the whole duende thing. But Mayhew shows us how, for one reason or another, and for reasons not entirely divorced from the ongoing crisis of masculinity of the 1950s, the concept of duende became extremely important to this group of poets--mostly men, though Mayhew points out that Denise Levertov, Diane Wakoski, and Hilda Morley wrote with at least a glancing awareness of Lorca.

His list is a long one, but perhaps the most intriguing chapter of Mayhew is the coda, in which he acknowledges that Lorca's influence on US poetics appears to be drawing to a close. Where once everyone from Langston Hughes to Creeley to Frank O'Hara used him as their personal MFA program, today very few poets of note bother with the man. Is this a testament to the never to be underestimated shallowness of our gene pool? Or is there a way in which, once more generally understood, a cult figure's mojo ceases to shine or vibrate? I have also thought that it might be a result of narrowcasting: now that there are actual experts on Lorca in the United States, people who actually know what duende is, the rest of us are just left feeling pretty inadequate. Until that moment, Mayhew has written a book that will stand the test of time, an authoritative survey on a controversial and protean subject, one infinitely twisty like a snake on the Andalusian plain.
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