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Antifragile: Things that Gain from Disorder von [Taleb, Nassim Nicholas]
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Wall Street's principal dissident (Malcolm Gladwell)

The hottest thinker in the world (Bryan Appleyard The Sunday Times)

A guru for every would-be Damien Hirst, George Soros and aspirant despot (John Cornwell Sunday Times)

A superhero of the mind (Boyd Tonkin)

Nassim Taleb, in his exasperating but compelling book Antifragile, praises "things that gain from disorder" - people, policies and institutions designed to thrive on volatility, instead of shattering in the encounter with it (Oliver Burkman Guardian)

More than just robust or flexible, it actively thrives on disruption (Julian Baggini Guardian)

full of important warnings and insights (Julian Baggini Guardian)

Modern life is akin to a chronic stress injury. And the way to combat it is to embrace randomness in all its forms...the great seer of the modern age (Guardian)

Something antifragile actively thrives under the impact of the embrace randomness rather than trying to control it (The Sunday Times)

Enduring volatility is one thing; what about benefiting from it?...That is what Taleb calls 'antifragility' and he thinks that it is the ultimate model to aspire to-for individuals, financial institutions, even nations...may well capture a quality that you have long aspired to without having quite known quite what it is...I saw the world afresh (The Times)

Taleb takes on everything from the mistakes of modern architecture to the dangers of meddlesome doctors and how overrated formal education is. . . . An ambitious and thought-provoking read . . . highly entertaining (Economist)

This is a bold, entertaining, clever book, richly crammed with insights, stories, fine phrases and intriguing asides. . . . I will have to read it again. And again (Wall Street Journal)

[Taleb] writes as if he were the illegitimate spawn of David Hume and Rev. Bayes, with some DNA mixed in from Norbert Weiner and Laurence Sterne. . . . Taleb is writing original stuff-not only within the management space but for readers of any literature-and . . . you will learn more about more things from this book and be challenged in more ways than by any other book you have read this year. Trust me on this (Harvard Business Review)

What sometimes goes unsaid about Taleb is that he's a very funny writer. Taleb has a finely tuned BS detector, which he wields throughout the book to debunk pervasive yet pernicious ideas. . . . Antifragility isn't just sound economic and political doctrine. It's also the key to a good life (Fortune)

A new kind of strength...not invincible but better able to handle life's inevitable surprises...such a combination leaves open the possibility of big rewards while minimizing exposure to risk (Los Angeles Times)

At once thought-provoking and brilliant, this book dares you not to read it (Los Angeles Times)

Antifragility is the secret to success in a world full of uncertainty, a system for turning random mutations to lasting advantage... (Economist)


Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan and one of the foremost thinkers of our time, reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world.

Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, volatility, and turmoil. What Taleb has identified and calls antifragile are things that not only gain from chaos but need it in order to survive and flourish.

In The Black Swan, Taleb showed us that highly improbable and unpredictable events underlie almost everything about our world. Here Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary. The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better.

What's more, the antifragile is immune to prediction errors and protected from adverse events. Why is the city-state better than the nation-state, why is debt bad for you, and why is what we call "efficient" not efficient at all? Why do government responses and social policies protect the strong and hurt the weak? Why should you write your resignation letter before starting on the job? How did the sinking of the Titanic save lives? The book spans innovation by trial and error, life decisions, politics, urban planning, war, personal finance, economic systems and medicine, drawing on modern street wisdom and ancient sources.

is a blueprint for living in a Black Swan world.

Erudite, witty, and iconoclastic, Taleb's message is revolutionary: the antifragile, and only the antifragile, will make it.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb has devoted his life to problems of uncertainty, probability, and knowledge and has led three careers around this focus, as a businessman-trader, a philosophical essayist, and an academic researcher. Although he now spends most of his time working in intense seclusion in his study, in the manner of independent scholars, he is currently Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at New York University's Polytechnic Institute. His main subject matter is "decision making under opacity," that is, a map and a protocol on how we should live in a world we don't understand.

His books Fooled by Randomness and The Black Swan have been published in thirty-three languages.

Taleb believes that prizes, honorary degrees, awards, and ceremonialism debase knowledge by turning it into a spectator sport.


  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 4834 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 504 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0812979680
  • Verlag: Penguin (27. November 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0141038225
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141038223
  • ASIN: B009K6DKTS
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.1 von 5 Sternen 32 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #70.336 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
*A full executive summary of this book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Monday, December 17, 2012.

The concept of fragility is very familiar to us. It applies to things that break when you strike or stretch them with a relatively small amount of force. Porcelain cups and pieces of thread are fragile. Things that do not break so easily when you apply force to them we call strong or resilient, even robust. A cast-iron pan, for instance. However, there is a third category here that is often overlooked. It includes those things that actually get stronger or improve when they are met with a stressor (up to a point). Take weight-lifting. If you try to lift something too heavy, you’ll tear a muscle; but lifting more appropriate weights will strengthen your muscles over time. This property can be said to apply to living things generally, as in the famous aphorism ‘what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger’. Strangely, we don’t really have a word for this property, this opposite of fragility.

For author Nassim Nicholas Taleb, this is a real shame, for when we look closely, it turns out that a lot of things (indeed the most important things) have, or are subject to, this property. Indeed, for Taleb, pretty much anything living, and the complex things that these living things create (like societies, economic systems, businesses etc.) have, or must confront this property in some way. This is important to know, because understanding this can help us understand how to improve these things (or profit from them), and failing to understand it can cause us to unwittingly harm or even destroy them (and be harmed by them).
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In this book Nassim Taleb applies his observations and theories from "The Black Swan Event" and "Fooled By Randomness" onto different aspects of life. By that he more or less constructs a philosophy for life. As in the previous books his writing is very vivid and easy to read. At times he cannot help but directly attack his intellectual opponents (or rather enemies). In these instances his writing becomes kind of polemic. I agree with his arguments, and his anger may be justified but I suspect the book would feel more credible if he had left some of this out.

So should you read this?

If you want hear a compelling argument against modernism, interventionism, and the contemporary manifestations of fortune-telling from the point of view of a rational skeptic - then yes. If you just want to become familiar with the central idea of Nassim Taleb then you would be better off reading one of his other two books. If you already have read one of them and liked it then chances are you will like this one as well.
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Exposing the fallacies of over-hyped risk management and doing so in an amusing manner may help in avoiding the next crisis. On the downside I found too many repetitions, over-simplified and sometimes inexact mathematical explanations, and even negative name-dropping can become boring.
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Wollte man das umfangreiche Buch in einem einzigen Satz zusammenfassen, müßte dieser lauten: Keiner ist so schlau wie Nassim!
Denn alle kriegen sie hier ihr Fett weg: Ökonomen, Statistiker, Philosophen, Naturwissenschaftler, Wissenschaftstheoretiker usw. usf. Daß der Autor in vielen Disziplinen offenkundig nicht einmal Oberflächenwissen besitzt - was verschlägt's? Das macht ihm das Kritisieren um so einfacher.

Taleb brüstet sich damit, eben nicht akademisch zu schreiben. So gerät das Buch zu einer äußerst willkürlichen Auswahl von Anekdoten, die, wo notwendig, auch noch gehörig zurechtgebogen werden, um die Ansichten des Autors zu stützen. Davor bleiben auch die von ihm so verehrten Werke der Antike nicht verschont, die er - stolz darauf, sie im Original zu lesen - oft auch noch so falsch zitiert, daß es jedem Latein-Abiturienten die Nackenhaare aufstellen würde. ("Magnus Opus" - brrrr...)

Argument ist alles, was dem Autor nützt.
Seine These, naturwissenschaftliche Bildung sei nicht die Voraussetzung, sondern das Resultat des Reichtums einer Gesellschaft, "beweist" er am Beispiel Kuwait. Japan? Nie gehört.
Weiters: Die Naturwissenschaften würden in ihrer Theoriebildung immer den Werken von Ingenieuren und anderen findigen Bastlern hinterhereilen. Computerchips, Laser, GPS? Nie gehört.
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Englisch ist meine Muttersprache und dementsprechend sollte es kein Problem sein.

Ich fand es etwas schwierig mich irgendwie einzulesen. Herr Taleb ist anscheinend sehr intelligent und belesen. Als entspannt was auf dem Sofa abends zu lesen ist dieses Buch für mich nicht geeignet.

Was er sagt macht irgendwie Sinn und das Konzept was er erklären möchte ist verständlich und durchdacht. Es braucht aber mehr Zeit zu begreifen als ich es schenken wollte.
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