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The Sun Also Rises (Hemingway Library Edition) (English Edition) von [Hemingway, Ernest]

The Sun Also Rises (Hemingway Library Edition) (English Edition) Kindle Edition

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Kindle Edition, 25. Juli 2002
EUR 9,90

Länge: 256 Seiten Word Wise: Aktiviert Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
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Sprache: Englisch

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

The Sun Also Rises first appeared in 1926, and yet it's as fresh and clean and fine as it ever was, maybe finer. Hemingway's famously plain declarative sentences linger in the mind like poetry: "Brett was damned good-looking. She wore a slipover jersey sweater and a tweed skirt, and her hair was brushed back like a boy's. She started all that." His cast of thirtysomething dissolute expatriates--Brett and her drunken fiancé, Mike Campbell, the unhappy Princeton Jewish boxer Robert Cohn, the sardonic novelist Bill Gorton--are as familiar as the "cool crowd" we all once knew. No wonder this quintessential lost-generation novel has inspired several generations of imitators, in style as well as lifestyle.

Jake Barnes, Hemingway's narrator with a mysterious war wound that has left him sexually incapable, is the heart and soul of the book. Brett, the beautiful, doomed English woman he adores, provides the glamour of natural chic and sexual unattainability. Alcohol and post-World War I anomie fuel the plot: weary of drinking and dancing in Paris cafés, the expatriate gang decamps for the Spanish town of Pamplona for the "wonderful nightmare" of a week-long fiesta. Brett, with fiancé and ex-lover Cohn in tow, breaks hearts all around until she falls, briefly, for the handsome teenage bullfighter Pedro Romero. "My God! he's a lovely boy," she tells Jake. "And how I would love to see him get into those clothes. He must use a shoe-horn." Whereupon the party disbands.

But what's most shocking about the book is its lean, adjective-free style. The Sun Also Rises is Hemingway's masterpiece--one of them, anyway--and no matter how many times you've read it or how you feel about the manners and morals of the characters, you won't be able to resist its spell. This is a classic that really does live up to its reputation. --David Laskin

Amazon.com

The Sun Also Rises first appeared in 1926, and yet it's as fresh and clean and fine as it ever was, maybe finer. Hemingway's famously plain declarative sentences linger in the mind like poetry: "Brett was damned good-looking. She wore a slipover jersey sweater and a tweed skirt, and her hair was brushed back like a boy's. She started all that." His cast of thirtysomething dissolute expatriates--Brett and her drunken fiancé, Mike Campbell, the unhappy Princeton Jewish boxer Robert Cohn, the sardonic novelist Bill Gorton--are as familiar as the "cool crowd" we all once knew. No wonder this quintessential lost-generation novel has inspired several generations of imitators, in style as well as lifestyle.

Jake Barnes, Hemingway's narrator with a mysterious war wound that has left him sexually incapable, is the heart and soul of the book. Brett, the beautiful, doomed English woman he adores, provides the glamour of natural chic and sexual unattainability. Alcohol and post-World War I anomie fuel the plot: weary of drinking and dancing in Paris cafés, the expatriate gang decamps for the Spanish town of Pamplona for the "wonderful nightmare" of a week-long fiesta. Brett, with fiancé and ex-lover Cohn in tow, breaks hearts all around until she falls, briefly, for the handsome teenage bullfighter Pedro Romero. "My God! he's a lovely boy," she tells Jake. "And how I would love to see him get into those clothes. He must use a shoe-horn." Whereupon the party disbands.

But what's most shocking about the book is its lean, adjective-free style. The Sun Also Rises is Hemingway's masterpiece--one of them, anyway--and no matter how many times you've read it or how you feel about the manners and morals of the characters, you won't be able to resist its spell. This is a classic that really does live up to its reputation. --David Laskin


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1344 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 256 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0099908506
  • Verlag: Scribner; Auflage: Reprint (25. Juli 2002)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B000FC0V3E
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Nicht aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen 175 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #128.950 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Kundenrezensionen

Top-Kundenrezensionen

Format: Taschenbuch
Set in the flamboyant twenties, Hemingway's Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises switches from the raving parties and heavy drinking of urban Paris to the rural splendour of the Spanish mainland and the bloody spectacle of the bull fights. The emotionally charged friction, which sparks as personalities clash amongst a small group of expatriates, is mirrored by the intense passion emanating from the contest between man and beast.
The author portrays with remarkable but nonetheless efficacious simplicity the struggle between mankind and nature, between animal and human existence. Furthermore, Hemingway's novel characterises the mundane and materialistic essence of European post-war society, lucidly exhibiting the lost generation's repugnance of a world obsessed with wealth and devoid of idealism.
Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises marks a milestone in the career of one of America's most eminent writers. The novel serves as a perfect example of American modernist fiction.
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Format: Taschenbuch
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.

The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.

Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.

To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.

The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.
The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.
Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.
To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.
The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Format: Taschenbuch
One of the most striking features of this novel is the bland superficiality of the characters. I found that I did not particularly like any of them, and that dampened my appreciation of the story.
The book is about a sort of competition for the lady Brett Ashley. She enjoys using men as her playtoys and delights in their chase after her. The persona from whose point of view the story is told is Jake Barnes. The rest of the characters are unremarkable and are mostly only memorable for their blandness.
We go from France to the bullfighting performances in Spain & there are fascinating allusions to the matador / bull relationship being akin to courtship and sexual intercourse between a man and woman. Images of impotence and castration abound and are made all the more significant as Jake can no longer sexually "perform" due to a wartime injury.
This book is certainly not for everyone. I am glad I read it & would recommend it as an important 20th century literary work (even though I did not especially enjoy it myself). It is not so different from the apathetic landscape of T.S. Eliot's poem "The Wasteland"; a world in which it is thought that feeling nothing at all is preferable to feeling pain. But nothing could be more horrifying than a notion such as that....
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