Facebook Twitter Pinterest <Einbetten>
Auf Lager.
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
1984 ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
Gebraucht: Sehr gut | Details
Verkauft von Warehouse Deals
Zustand: Gebraucht: Sehr gut
Kommentar: Schrumpffolie fehlt, Aktivierungscodes für Online-Bonusinhalte können fehlen bzw. abgelaufen sein. Kleiner Fleck oder geringe Abnutzung auf der Vorderseite. Kleiner Schnitt oder Kratzer auf der Vorderseite. Kleine Falte oder kleiner Knick auf der Vorderseite.
Andere Verkäufer auf Amazon
In den Einkaufswagen
EUR 8,86
+ kostenlose Lieferung
Verkauft von: Book Depository DE
In den Einkaufswagen
EUR 9,99
+ kostenlose Lieferung
Verkauft von: averdo24
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Bei Amazon verkaufen
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Hörprobe Wird gespielt... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Hörprobe des Audible Hörbuch-Downloads.
Mehr erfahren
Alle 3 Bilder anzeigen

1984 (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. Juli 1950

4.5 von 5 Sternen 745 Kundenrezensionen

Alle 230 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
Taschenbuch, 1. Juli 1950
EUR 7,99
EUR 2,87 EUR 0,01
Unbekannter Einband
EUR 8,28
 
click to open popover

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

  • 1984
  • +
  • Brave New World
  • +
  • Animal Farm
Gesamtpreis: EUR 21,97
Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Es wird kein Kindle Gerät benötigt. Laden Sie eine der kostenlosen Kindle Apps herunter und beginnen Sie, Kindle-Bücher auf Ihrem Smartphone, Tablet und Computer zu lesen.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Geben Sie Ihre Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

George Orwell (pseudonym for Eric Blair [1903-50]) was born in Bengal and educated at Eton; after service with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, he returned to Europe to earn his living penning novels and essays. He was essentially a political writer who focused his attention on his own times, a man of intense feelings and intense hates. An opponent of totalitarianism, he served in the Loyalist forces in the Spanish Civil War. Besides his classic Animal Farm, his works include a novel based on his experiences as a colonial policeman, Burmese Days, two firsthand studies of poverty, Down and Out in Paris and London and The Road to Wigan Pier, an account of his experiences in the Spanish Civil War, Homage to Catalonia; and the extraordinary novel of political prophecy whose title became part of our language, 1984.

Leseprobe. Abdruck erfolgt mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Rechteinhaber. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

ONE

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. Winston Smith, his chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile wind, slipped quickly through the glass doors of Victory Mansions, though not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from entering along with him.

The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats. At one end of it a colored poster, too large for indoor display, had been tacked to the wall. It depicted simply an enormous face, more than a meter wide: the face of a man of about forty-five, with a heavy black mustache and ruggedly handsome features. Winston made for the stairs. It was no use trying the lift. Even at the best of times it was seldom working, and at present the electric current was cut off during daylight hours. It was part of the economy drive in preparation for Hate Week. The flat was seven flights up, and Winston, who was thirty-nine, and had a varicose ulcer above his right ankle, went slowly, resting several times on the way. On each landing, opposite the lift shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran.

Inside the flat a fruity voice was reading out a list of figures which had something to do with the production of pig iron. The voice came from an oblong metal plaque like a dulled mirror which formed part of the surface of the right-hand wall. Winston turned a switch and the voice sank somewhat, though the words were still distinguishable. The instrument (the telescreen, it was called) could be dimmed, but there was no way of shutting it off completely. He moved over to the window: a smallish, frail figure, the meagerness of his body merely emphasized by the blue overalls which were the uni- form of the Party. His hair was very fair, his face naturally sanguine, his skin roughened by coarse soap and blunt razor blades and the cold of the winter that had just ended.

Outside, even through the shut window pane, the world looked cold. Down in the street little eddies of wind were whirling dust and torn paper into spirals, and though the sun was shining and the sky a harsh blue, there seemed to be no color in anything except the posters that were plastered every- where. The black-mustachio’d face gazed down from every commanding corner. There was one on the house front immediately opposite. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption said, while the dark eyes looked deep into Winston’s own. Down at street level another poster, torn at one corner, flapped fitfully in the wind, alternately covering  and  uncovering the single word INGSOC. In the far distance a helicopter skimmed down between the roofs, hovered for an instant like a blue-bottle, and darted away again with a curving flight. It was the Police Patrol, snooping into people’s windows. The patrols did not matter, however. Only the Thought Police mattered.

Behind Winston’s back the voice from the telescreen was still babbling away about pig iron and the overfulfillment of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. The telescreen received and transmitted simultaneously. Any sound that Winston made, above the level of a very low whisper, would be picked up by it; moreover, so long as he remained within the field of vision which the metal plaque commanded, he could be seen as well as heard. There was of course no way of knowing whether you were being watched at any given moment. How often, or on what system, the Thought Police plugged in on any individual wire was guesswork. It was even conceivable that they watched everybody all the time. But at any rate they could plug in your wire whenever they wanted to. You had to live— did live, from habit that became instinct—in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every movement scrutinized.

Winston kept his back turned to the telescreen. It was safer; though, as he well knew, even a back can be revealing. A kilometer away the Ministry of Truth, his place of work, towered vast and white above the grimy landscape. This, he thought with a sort of vague distaste—this was London, chief city of Airstrip One, itself the third most populous of the provinces of Oceania. He tried to squeeze out some childhood memory that should tell him whether London had always been quite like this. Were there always these vistas of rotting nineteenth- century houses, their sides shored up with balks of timber, their windows patched with cardboard and their roofs with corrugated iron, their crazy garden walls sagging in all directions? And the bombed sites where the plaster dust swirled in the air and the willow herb straggled over the heaps of rubble; and the places where the bombs had cleared a larger path and there had sprung up sordid colonies of wooden dwellings like chicken houses? But it was no use, he could not remember: nothing remained of his childhood except a series of bright-lit tableaux, occurring against no background and mostly unintelligible.

The Ministry of Truth—Minitrue, in Newspeak*—was startlingly different from any other object in sight. It was an enormous pyramidal structure of glittering white concrete, soaring up, terrace after terrace, three hundred meters into the air. From where Winston stood it was just possible to read, picked out on its white face in elegant lettering, the three slogans of the Party:

WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY

IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH.

The Ministry of Truth contained, it was said, three thousand rooms above ground level, and corresponding ramifications below. Scattered about London there were just three other buildings of similar appearance and size. So completely did they dwarf the surrounding architecture that from the roof of Victory Mansions you could see all four of them simultaneously. They were the homes of the four Ministries between which the entire apparatus of government was divided: the Ministry of Truth, which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education, and the fine arts; the Ministry of Peace, which concerned itself with war; the Ministry of Love, which maintained law and order; and the Ministry of Plenty, which was responsible for economic affairs. Their names, in Newspeak: Minitrue, Minipax, Miniluv, and Miniplenty.

The Ministry of Love was the really frightening one. There were no windows in it at all. Winston had never been inside the Ministry of Love, nor within half a kilometer of it. It was a place impossible to enter except on official business, and then only by penetrating through a maze of barbed-wire entanglements, steel doors, and hidden machine-gun nests. Even the streets leading up to its outer barriers were roamed by gorilla-faced guards in black uniforms, armed with jointed truncheons.

Winston turned round abruptly. He had set his features into the expression of quiet optimism which it was advisable to wear when facing the telescreen. He crossed the room into the tiny kitchen. By leaving the Ministry at this time of day he had sacrificed his lunch in the canteen, and he was aware that there was no food in the kitchen except a hunk of dark-colored bread which had got to be saved for tomorrow’s breakfast. He took down from the shelf a bottle of colorless liquid with a plain white label marked VICTORY GIN. It gave off a sickly, oily smell, as of Chinese rice-spirit. Winston poured out nearly a teacupful, nerved himself for a shock, and gulped it down like a dose of medicine.

Instantly his face turned scarlet and the water ran out of his eyes. The stuff was like nitric acid, and moreover, in swallow- ing it one had the sensation of being hit on the back of the head with a rubber club. The next moment, however, the burning in his belly died down and the world...


Kundenrezensionen

Bewertet von Kunden, die interessiert sind an
Geschichte
4,6 von 5 Sternen
4,6 von 5 Sternen
Wissenschaft
4,5 von 5 Sternen
4,5 von 5 Sternen
Buchreihe
4,1 von 5 Sternen
4,1 von 5 Sternen

Lesen Sie Rezensionen, die folgende Stichworte enthalten

Top-Kundenrezensionen

am 21. November 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
8 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 22. Januar 2018
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 5. Mai 2017
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 3. Juli 2017
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 3. November 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 8. Juni 2016
Format: Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
4 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 18. Dezember 2014
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
3 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 3. Januar 2016
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich
|Kommentar|Missbrauch melden

Möchten Sie weitere Rezensionen zu diesem Artikel anzeigen?

Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen

Wo ist meine Bestellung?

Versand & Rücknahme

Brauchen Sie Hilfe?