Kundenrezension

3.0 von 5 Sternen Useful ideas but infuriatingly arrogant, 15. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Inmates are Running the Asylum: Why High-tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The Inmates are Running the Asylum makes the business case for interaction designers playing a central role in the development of technology products. It starts by providing examples of technology that is difficult, frustrating, humiliating, and even dangerous to use. Cooper argues that, although people have gotten used to being humiliated by technology, it doesn't have to be this way. His claim is that most technology, especially software, is designed by engineers who think differently than non-technical people: they enjoy being challenged by difficult problems and they are trained to think in terms of "edge cases" rather than on the common case. Thus when engineers design software, they tend to create products with far too many neat features that clutter the interface and make it difficult to do the simpler tasks. In the second part of the book, Cooper describes an approach that he and his design firm uses to simplify products and keep them focused on the users' needs, eliminating or hiding more complex features that few people use. He gives some specific and compelling examples of how they took a different approach to an interesting design problem and keep the product simple while still being powerful. He makes the case that you can grab a market with powerful, feature-rich, complex software that is frustrating to use, but you don't build customer loyalty that way; as soon as a well-designed version of that product comes along, your customers will defect. If you delight the user with your products, on the other hand, you will engender deep loyalty that will help see you through some poor business decisions. His primary example of this is the fanatical loyalty that Apple garners from its users, compared with the rage that Windows users feel toward Microsoft. Apple has weathered some horrendous business decisions and still survives, whereas Microsoft users are more than happy to defect when a better product comes along, and in fact revel in the defection.
I also don't think he makes it clear enough that he's not proposing doing *fewer* features to make products simpler and easier to use, he's talking about doing *different* features. For example, he argues that software should not be so lazy; it should stop making the user do work that the computer is better suited to doing (e.g. remembering where they put files), and it should stop making users go through the same steps over and over again, as if it were the first time they had ever met this user. He argues that "Do you really mean it?" popups are evil (and I couldn't agree more - as most of my coworkers know), and instead it should be easy to undo anything, so it's not so catastrophic to do something you didn't meant to do. I agree with all that, but of course building a reasonable "undo" mechanism is a very complex feature. To cure the "How could you possibly want to quit my ever-so-important application?" popup syndrome, it would be much better to make the software very fast to start up, and to have it come back in exactly the state you left it in, so that quitting when you didn't mean to is not a problem. All of this is well worth doing, but it is lots of engineering work; it's another feature. I'm all for shifting engineer resources to these features instead of the "but somebody *might* want to do this obscure thing" features, but it should be clear that this is not doing fewer features, it's doing different ones, ones that help smooth the user's interaction with the software. Cooper seems to imply that engineers are so lazy that they don't want to do these features, but most engineers work very hard and care about their product. The key is to make it clear why doing this feature right will make such a big difference to the product. My experience has been that the more you understand the work involved in doing a feature, the better you can work with engineers. Not only can you better trade off engineering effort for user benefit, but engineers respect you for understanding what you're asking.
Having said all that, I can't deny that I finished this book with some very specific ideas about improving my own designs, and a renewed sense of the importance of what I do. I just wish Cooper could have articulated the case without putting interaction designers "on a throne."
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein

Schreiben Sie als erste Person zu dieser Rezension einen Kommentar.

[Kommentar hinzufügen]
Kommentar posten
Verwenden Sie zum Einfügen eines Produktlinks dieses Format: [[ASIN:ASIN Produkt-Name]] (Was ist das?)
Amazon wird diesen Namen mit allen Ihren Beiträgen, einschließlich Rezensionen und Diskussion-Postings, anzeigen. (Weitere Informationen)
Name:
Badge:
Dieses Abzeichen wird Ihnen zugeordnet und erscheint zusammen mit Ihrem Namen.
There was an error. Please try again.
">Hier finden Sie die kompletten Richtlinien.

Offizieller Kommentar

Als Vertreter dieses Produkt können Sie einen offiziellen Kommentar zu dieser Rezension veröffentlichen. Er wird unmittelbar unterhalb der Rezension angezeigt, wo immer diese angezeigt wird.   Weitere Informationen
Der folgende Name und das Abzeichen werden mit diesem Kommentar angezeigt:
Nach dem Anklicken der Schaltfläche "Übermitteln" werden Sie aufgefordert, Ihren öffentlichen Namen zu erstellen, der mit allen Ihren Beiträgen angezeigt wird.

Ist dies Ihr Produkt?

Wenn Sie der Autor, Künstler, Hersteller oder ein offizieller Vertreter dieses Produktes sind, können Sie einen offiziellen Kommentar zu dieser Rezension veröffentlichen. Er wird unmittelbar unterhalb der Rezension angezeigt, wo immer diese angezeigt wird.  Weitere Informationen
Ansonsten können Sie immer noch einen regulären Kommentar zu dieser Rezension veröffentlichen.

Ist dies Ihr Produkt?

Wenn Sie der Autor, Künstler, Hersteller oder ein offizieller Vertreter dieses Produktes sind, können Sie einen offiziellen Kommentar zu dieser Rezension veröffentlichen. Er wird unmittelbar unterhalb der Rezension angezeigt, wo immer diese angezeigt wird.   Weitere Informationen
 
Timeout des Systems

Wir waren konnten nicht überprüfen, ob Sie ein Repräsentant des Produkts sind. Bitte versuchen Sie es später erneut, oder versuchen Sie es jetzt erneut. Ansonsten können Sie einen regulären Kommentar veröffentlichen.

Da Sie zuvor einen offiziellen Kommentar veröffentlicht haben, wird dieser Kommentar im nachstehenden Kommentarbereich angezeigt. Sie haben auch die Möglichkeit, Ihren offiziellen Kommentar zu bearbeiten.   Weitere Informationen
Die maximale Anzahl offizieller Kommentare wurde veröffentlicht. Dieser Kommentar wird im nachstehenden Kommentarbereich angezeigt.   Weitere Informationen
Eingabe des Log-ins
 


Details

Artikel

Rezensentin / Rezensent


Ort: San Francisco Bay Area, CA USA

Top-Rezensenten Rang: 3.521.817