Kundenrezensionen


24 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (15)
4 Sterne:
 (4)
3 Sterne:
 (2)
2 Sterne:
 (1)
1 Sterne:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Brief Summary and Review
The thrust: Over the past 20 years, and particularly in the past decade, the stock market has undergone some significant changes. The most visible change is that much of the action has now become computerized. For example, whereas stock markets used to consist of trading floors (pits), where floor traders swapped stocks back and forth, we now have computer servers where...
Vor 8 Monaten von A. D. Thibeault veröffentlicht

versus
15 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Eine Mogelpackung
Das Buch lebt von nur einem einzigen Gedanken: High Frequency Trading Hedge Fonds testen mit kleinen Orders, ob gößere Pakete in den Markt kommen und geben diese Info dann superschnell an alle anderen Börsenplätze weiter - noch bevor diese größeren Pakete dort aufschlagen. Und sie profitieren dann vom Frontrunning.
Dieser eine Gedanke...
Vor 8 Monaten von Amazon Customer veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Brief Summary and Review, 7. April 2014
The thrust: Over the past 20 years, and particularly in the past decade, the stock market has undergone some significant changes. The most visible change is that much of the action has now become computerized. For example, whereas stock markets used to consist of trading floors (pits), where floor traders swapped stocks back and forth, we now have computer servers where sellers and buyers are connected automatically. Now, on the one hand, this automation has led to some substantial efficiencies, as once necessary financial intermediaries have now largely become obsolete (this has led to savings not only because the old intermediaries earned an honest commission for their dealings, but because their privileged position sometimes led to corruption).

It is not that the new stock market has done away with intermediaries entirely. Take brokers, for example. Brokers are still used by large investors to help them move large chunks of stock where the market may not be able to fill the order immediately. The brokers take some risk in this action, and provide liquidity in doing so, since they help move capital to its most useful location, and thus brokers still provide a very useful service.

While brokers have always existed, the new stock market has also added a new breed of intermediary. This new breed of intermediary is known as the high frequency trader (HFT). The high frequency trader operates on speed, relying on location and advanced communications technology to learn about the movement of the market before others, and uses this knowledge to make winning trades.

To give you an indication of how important high frequency trading has become, consider that at least half of the trades now being made in the United States are coming from high frequency traders.

Those who defend high frequency trading argue that these quick trades actually help move money through the stock market, and thus add liquidity to the system (the way brokers do); and that, therefore, high frequency traders provide a valuable service.

However, just how high frequency trading works has largely remained a mystery to anyone outside of the industry itself; and many have become concerned that high frequency trading is not so much a liquidity-contributor as a way of scalping money off of trades that would have happened anyway.

In 'Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt', Michael Lewis follows one man who made it his mission to find out what was going on at the heart of HFT. That man is one Brad Katsuyama, a broker from the sleepy Canadian bank RBC.

Katsuyama’s interest in the mystery began back in 2007, when he found that the trades he was trying to make from his desk at RBC were not being executed in the way they once had. In short, Katsuyama was being ripped off. And that’s not all. Katsuyama soon found that other brokers were also being ripped off—and even the investment firms were being ripped off. And since the investment firms manage your money and mine, we were being ripped off too!! This was big.

Katsuyama’s dogged persistence eventually led him (and a growing band of fellow mystery-solvers) to find that it was indeed the high frequency traders who were ripping him (and everyone else) off (though the HFTs were not the only culprits involved). What’s more, Katsuyama’s team also discovered just how the HFTs were doing it. The long and the short of it is that the HFTs are just gaming the technology. And in a way that is not only ripping others off, but making the system more volatile, and prone to errors and disasters as well (witness the flash crash of May 6, 2010).

Rather than deciding to join the HFTs at the trough (which would have been easy enough to do), Katsuyama and his team decided to fix things. Specifically, the team decided to start their own stock exchange: a stock exchange (called the IEX) that was designed to be immune to advantages in technology, and hence fundamentally fair to all (it was either that or wait around for the SEC to do something—which may take forever).

Now, you would think that a stock exchange that is fundamentally fair to all would be a big hit. But then again, a whole heck of a lot of people have no interest in making things fair to all. Which side will win? The fate of the IEX (which opened in October of 2013) has yet to be determined...

This book is fantastic. The story will confirm your suspicious that truth is stranger than fiction. Lewis writes beautifully, unpretentiously, and makes the characters jump right off the page (that wouldn’t have been that difficult here—these are some brilliant characters). My only objection is that Lewis’ explanations of the technical side of things, while very good, could have occasionally been slightly more clear. Still, an enlightening and wonderful read.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting all the way through.....hard to put down, 30. Oktober 2014
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt (Kindle Edition)
I wanted to read this in one sitting because there was always something interesting happening. While the stock market may not fascinate everyone, this is a great read into how people in the market will find a way to make a dollar, and how the average investor (even relatively large investor) always gets taken for a little bit off the top. It highlights how regulations need to be continually updated for changing technologies and how big brokers seem to have influenced what is 'right' and 'justifiable' in how trades are done and how different rules apply to the average investor. It certainly seems like a dirty business at the sharp end of the market where the trades are done, but at least the average investor can still do well by picking the right stocks and not getting caught up in the % of a cent that these flash boys are dealing in.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


15 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Eine Mogelpackung, 27. April 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Das Buch lebt von nur einem einzigen Gedanken: High Frequency Trading Hedge Fonds testen mit kleinen Orders, ob gößere Pakete in den Markt kommen und geben diese Info dann superschnell an alle anderen Börsenplätze weiter - noch bevor diese größeren Pakete dort aufschlagen. Und sie profitieren dann vom Frontrunning.
Dieser eine Gedanke wird dann wieder und wieder gekäut. Und am Rande füllen dann viele überwiegend belanglose Stories die viel zu vielen Seiten des Buches.

Ich kenne Michal Lewis von 'Liar's Poker', ein wirklich hochinteressantes und sehr empfehlenswertes Buch!
Aber 'Flash Boys' ist verdammt langatmig, und somit eine Qual zu lesen.
Ein Fehlkauf, und schlimmer noch: Zeitvergeudung.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Spannende Handlung basierend auf realen Personen und Fakten, 22. Oktober 2014
ich lese normalerweise keine Romane sondern nur Börsenfachbücher. Da ich dieses Buch vor einer Flugreise geschenkt bekommen hatte habe ich es nun einmal gelesen.

Mein Fazit dazu ist:
- geschickter Aufbau mehrerer Handlungstränge (der Geschäftsmann, der die neue Glasfaserleitung baut, der Hauptdarsteller - der bemerkt, dass sein bit/ask verschwindet ...)
- die unterschiedlichen Handlungsstränge werden Meisterhaft zusammengeführt
- die Geschichte basiert auf Fakten, die genannten Personen exisitieren in Realität

Insgesamt eine Empfehlung.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Pure Enttäuschung, 17. September 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Das Buch ist schlicht einschläfernd und fachlich belanglos. Ich habe bereits Liar’s Poker und The Big Short von Michael Lewis gelesen. Beide Bücher bieten dem Leser einen tiefen Einblick hinter die Kulissen der undurchsichtigen und komplexen Realität der Wall Street. Sie sind spannend, ermöglichen dem Leser Sympathien/Antipathien mit den Protagonisten zu entwickeln und haben einen hohen Wert an Unterhaltung.

Flash Boys ist nichts der Gleichen. Lewis beschreibt größtenteils Banalitäten aus dem Arbeitsleben einiger Trader und IT-Mitarbeiter. Schier unendliche Seiten langweiligen Arbeitsalltags. Das Kernthema nämlich der Hochfrequenzhandel und die dahinterstehende Problematik dieses Geschäftsmodells hätte man nach Wunsch auf drei Seiten erklären können. Ich musste mich über mehrere Seiten buchstäblich quälen bis ich schließlich im ersten Drittel des Buches kollabiert bin. Seit dem habe ich das Buch nicht mehr angefasst.

Allerdings möchte ich nicht die Schuld gänzlich für die misslungene Darstellung beim Autor suchen. Denn er wird aufgrund der langweiligen Protagonisten und einem trockenen Thema, in eine aussichtlose Lage gestellt, ein spannungsvolles und unterhaltsames Buch zu schreiben. Die Stärke von Lewis war bisher die Fähigkeit den komplexen Alltag der Wall Street mit ihren Finanzprodukten verständlich darzustellen, sodass auch ein Laie versteht warum es geht. In diesem Buch gelingt ihm diese Darstellung nicht. Die Protagonisten erscheinen als reservierte, emotionslose und introvertierte Charaktere, die nachts um drei an irgendwelchen Algorithmen in ihrem Hinterzimmerchen tüfteln und entsprechend nicht schaffen den Leser mitzureißen. Hinzu kommt noch ein super trockenes Thema, das für die meisten Menschen keinen Bezug zum alltäglichen Leben bietet. Fertig ist ein Buch mit hohem Flopppotenzial.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Nett, 1. Oktober 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt (Kindle Edition)
Interessantes Buch, teilweise etwas langatmig geschrieben aber interessant und ich habe das Gefühl eine grundsätzliche Ahnung zum Thema HFT und dark Pools bekommen zu haben.

Der Inhalt/ die facts sind eigentlich ein handfester Skandal, aber dass das an der Wall street resp. U.S. Politik keinen interessiert ist ja klar.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Zu viel Klim-Bim rund um ein sehr spezielles Thema, 15. Mai 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Michael Lewis kann über Wirtschaft und Börse, die Akteure, die Motivationen, die Konflikte "erzählen". Kein Zweifel! Hier hat er sich aber meines Erachtens ein zwar relevantes, aber für 280 Seiten nicht ausreichendes Thema gewählt. Hochfrequenzhandel als eine Spielart des algorithmischen Handels ist (und bleibt übrigens auch nach dem Lesen des Buches) eine Black Box, ein unverstandenes Phänomen. Lewis geht ja auch nur auf einen Bruchteil dieses Geschäftszweiges ein: Das regulatorische Defizit, das er beschreibt - National Best Bid and Offer (NBBO) - und das wegen der Vielzahl von Börsenplätzen und deren unterschiedlichen Prozessgeschwindigkeiten erst Arbitragemöglichkeiten eröffnet, ist nahezu ausschließlich ein amerikanisches Phänomen. Das sich dieses Problem durch die bewusste Verlangsamung und damit "Vergleichzeitigung" aller Börsen beheben lässt, ist einleuchtend. Die relative Nähe, die Michael Lewis zu den Gründern dieses neuen Börsenplatzes - Investors Exchange - hat, bringt ihm ja auch den Vorwurf ein, gezielt Marketing zu betreiben. Viele andere, meines Erachtens viel interessantere und zumindest in Europa auch viel wichtigere Grundformen des algorithmischen Handelns, bleiben völlig unerwähnt. Daneben lässt sich bei "Flash Boys" auch feststellen, dass einige der erzählten Anektoden, z.B. das geheimgehaltene Verlegen eines Glasfaserkabels zwischen Chicago und New York, ein wenig langatmig ausfallen. Fazit: Das Thema ist zu eng, um 280 Seiten zu tragen - The Big Short ist eindeutig das bessere Buch! Dennoch lesenswert!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Is it based on true story?, 26. Dezember 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
I didn't make any research to find out if this story is based on a true story. If it is, then this book is like a "Snowden" for the financial market participants like big investors,small investors and daytraders.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Hochinteressant, 2. November 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt (Kindle Edition)
Hochinteressant und packend geschrieben! Die schwierige Thematik des Hochfrequenzhandels wird hier sehr gut dargestellt. Leider muss ich jetzt noch sechs Wörter schreiben damit meine Meinung veröffentlicht wird.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Lesenswert für jeden, der sich für den Aktienmarkt interessiert, 23. April 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt (Kindle Edition)
Michael Lewis diskutiert das Thema sehr differenziert und gibt tiefe Einblicke in die heutigen Aktienmärkte. Interessant ist vor allem, dass nicht die Hochfrequenzhändler verteufelt werden, denn sie nutzen lediglich das Machbare in legalem Rahmen. Vielmehr sind die Aufsicht und die Börsenbertreiber, sowie die Broker gefragt eine fairere Handelsumgebung zu schaffen. Denn es ist eben nicht so, dass Geschwindigkeit schädlich für den Aktienmarkt ist, es resultieren daraus auch keine allzu grossen Risiken für Crashs. Geschwindigkeit nutzen, um Informationsvorsprünge zu realisieren ist ok und etwas ganz normales am Aktienmarkt. Nur wenn durch die Geschwindigkeit Informationsvorsprünge entstehen, dann ist es möglicherweise nicht fair und die Marktregeln sollten angepasst werden. Aber um das genauer zu verstehen, lesen Sie am besten das Buch.
Sehr anschaulich in dem Buch auch die Erklärung, dass die Hochleistungsinfrastruktur der Händler nicht dazu genutzt wird unendlich viele Käufe und Verkäufe zu tätigen, sondern "nur" um auf Ereignisse sehr schnell reagieren zu können. Eine Tatsache, die gerade in den deutschen Medien sehr oft verdreht wird.
Für mich ist das Buch ein klares "Buy".
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt
EUR 7,49
Auf meinen Wunschzettel Zahlungsmöglichkeiten ansehen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen