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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Good read
Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment is the first classic detective story. But that is not even where it excels. With the Brothers Karamazov, it elevated Dostoyevsky to a mega writer when it comes to dissecting the mind and soul of characters for the readers. It is a great book of psychology. While it competes with Anna Karenina as the most widely read 19th century Russian...
Veröffentlicht am 29. Januar 2005 von Monica

versus
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Comments on the translation
The excerpt of text from this Wordsworth Classic found in the Search Inside! function at Amazon.com is not the same as the text in the paperback Wordsworth Classic. Do not judge this translation by the excerpt found at Amazon. The ISBN numbers are the same, but the years differ (Amazon: 1997, paperback: 1993) as do the page-counts (Amazon: 434, paperback: 402)...
Veröffentlicht am 27. Juni 2007 von NorthernLight


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2.0 von 5 Sternen Comments on the translation, 27. Juni 2007
The excerpt of text from this Wordsworth Classic found in the Search Inside! function at Amazon.com is not the same as the text in the paperback Wordsworth Classic. Do not judge this translation by the excerpt found at Amazon. The ISBN numbers are the same, but the years differ (Amazon: 1997, paperback: 1993) as do the page-counts (Amazon: 434, paperback: 402).

Plenty of comments about Crime and Punishment exist among over a hundred reviews here; plenty of comments about the value, story, characters, plot, and meaning of Crime and Punishment can be found here. This review is about this translation, the Complete and Unabridged Wordsworth Classics edition of Crime and Punishment, which at least one review praises. I do not know more than a few phrases in Russian, but through comparing with other translations I have deduced that this Wordsworth version is not good.

Here are some reasons why:

Who translated this work? The translator is not credited. Is there only one? When was this translated? The first signs of a poor edition. It's copyright has probably gone out.

Comparing with other translations I've found that the Russian names aren't given in their full in this version. For example, Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikoff, as he's called here, is also known as Rodia by his mother and sister in other versions, such as the Swedish Hans Björkegren version from 1979. Eudoxia (Duonia) Romanonva as she is called here, is known as Eudoria Dunja Romanovna Raskolinkova in other versions. There are other discrepancies between names.

Which one is truest to Dostoevsky? Comparing the different translations, I have also found that the names are not as flexible in this version. For instance, in the other versions the names vary much more depending on who's addressing whom, and why they are doing so. Here the names vary little in different contexts.

Some sentences in this translation are beautiful, but many are clumsy. I don't know what Dostoevsky's writing is like in Russian, but I doubt he is known simply for his plots and characters. I assume he is also known for great prose, which, in my opinion, does not come out in this translation. E.g. "The woman laughed - yet with a silent laugh, striving hard no one should hear. Suddenly it struck Raskolnikoff that the room door was open; there also was laughter, whispering. Rage overcame him. Now, with a demon's power he struck, and struck and struck again. Yet laughter grew and whispher grew. As for the woman, she only writhed. He wished to run: -- the room was filling, the door stood open, and on the landing and on the stairs - here, there, and everywhere - people living people, they looked, looked on in silence. His heart stood still, his feet were leaden - he tried to cry out, and woke." Is this a bad translation, or is it transliteration of the Russian? I doubt the later--I doubt Dostoevsky wrote so sloppily.

Strange and archaic formulations also disturb my reading: "...many took him for a man in liquor", "what to do he decided at once", "Then he deposited his hat by his side", etc. Is this a story about Czarist Russians or Victorian Englishmen?

And importantly, the text is very small, the pages are large. Reading five hundred pages of this is not easy for the eyes.

I would give it no stars because the translation is peculiar, but I give it two stars because it is inexpensive and because in a good translation it's a great book.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Good read, 29. Januar 2005
Von 
Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment is the first classic detective story. But that is not even where it excels. With the Brothers Karamazov, it elevated Dostoyevsky to a mega writer when it comes to dissecting the mind and soul of characters for the readers. It is a great book of psychology. While it competes with Anna Karenina as the most widely read 19th century Russian novel in the English-speaking world, it is judged by many to be superior in its depth and lessons. The book's hero exemplifies all young ideologues who are wrestling with a new idea which they think can elevate them to the levels of great historic figures in their initial steps towards greatness. Often, a barrier has to be crossed which takes the potential legendary figure into an irreversible course. In Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov who is the hero is a poor, intelligent and thoughtful student who is convinced that he has a mission for the advancement of mankind. He convinces himself that the mission has to start with him crossing over to greatness by robbing and killing an old woman, a pawnbroker, whose death, he had convinced himself would do the world more good than harm. This conviction is based on his judgment that she cheats her clients and holds money that could be used for humanity. He then commits the murder, but is forced to kill the pitiful Elizabetha, the landlady's sister. The novel begins its twists and turns after these murders, with the introduction of the cunning detective who gets to investigate the murder and makes Raskolnikov his principal suspect. Raskolnikov gets to meet the destitute Marmeladovs through the alcoholic father, and is distraught by the plight of his consumptive mother, her three young children, and Sonya-Marmeladov's eighteen-year old daughter who is forced into prostitution in order to support the family.
By doing a rich psychology development of his characters, Dostoyevsky made his characters more complexly human, yet reachable. Sonya emerges as a saintly figure who sins for the sakes of those she loves , and who is the mirror through which the so-called devilish characters are redeemed. The plot is rich, deep, enjoyable and action-packed; and the pace is fast and engaging. The overriding strength of the story is the conflict in Raskolnikov's soul, a conflict which began in his quest to be the "Extraordinary Man" like Napoleon, by stepping over the basic bounds of morality by committing murder. That conflict in his soul brought out the rich ideas, discussions and emotions from the characters that interacted with him.
Also recommended: THE BROTHER KARAMAZOV, DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Boring? You're an Idiot, 25. Juli 2000
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Matthew T. Haley "kryogenic" (Austin, TX United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Crime and Punishment is one of my top 5 books. It is an amazing combination of politics, philosophy, and religion--an all encompassing grand show of humanity. The psychological depth of some of the scenes in this book will have you on the edge of your seat if you read them carefully. Dostoyevsky also has the brilliant ability to make hardcore philosophy emotionally RELEVANT, a feat many great philosophers fail at. Few books you will ever encounter will take your soul through such an emotionally disturbing dark tour of events. I sometimes am greatly moved just on reflecting on the novel, especially in regards to the dismal future of Russia Dostoyevsky warned the revolutionary ideas of his times would bring. His prescience was simply astounding.
Even though Crime and Punishment is a dreary Russian novel (the quintessential one, in fact) be assured of an uplifting and enlightening ending. Although critics often trash the epilogue, keep in mind it is the only thing that prevents the novel from being overbearing in sadness; it was not meant to be depressing, but rather, inspirational, as it certainly was to me. Also, I think everyone can identify a little with the Raskolnikovian split between compassion and brutal efficiency. You will understand when you pick this book up and begin reading the first chapter.
C&P changed my life, and I've never understood the meaning of Christianity as much as in my deep meditations on the masterpiece. This edition is a good one, as is the Norton Critical edition, which is unfortunately not available on Amazon. This is one of those books you must read once in your lifetime--do it now.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Classic for a Reason, 15. April 2000
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Paul McGrath (Sacramento, CA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Crime and Punishment (Taschenbuch)
I initially approached this book with a great deal of trepidation. I had never read Dostoyevsky, and was concerned that I would get bogged down in some lengthy, mind-numbingly boring, nineteenth-century treatise on the bestial nature of man or something. I am happy to report this is not the case. Instead, and to my delight, it is a smoothly flowing and fascinating story of a young man who succumbs to the most base desire, and the impact this has both psychologically and otherwise on himself and those around him.
To be sure, the book seems wordy in places, but I suspect this has to do with the translation. And what translator in his right mind would be bold enough to edit the great Dostoyevsky? But this is a very minor problem.
What we get with Dostoyevsky is dramatic tension, detailed and believable human characters, and brilliant insight into human nature. Early in the novel our hero meets and has a lengthy conversation with Marmeladov, a drunkard. This conversation is never uninteresting and ultimately becomes pathetic and heartbreaking, but I kept wondering why so much time was spent on it. As I got deeper into the book, I understood why this conversation was so important, and realized that I was in the hands of a master storyteller. This is also indicative of the way in which the story reveals itself. Nothing is hurried. These people speak the way we actually speak to one another in real life, and more importantly, Dostoyevsky is able to flesh out his characters into whole, three-dimensional human beings.
And what a diverse group of characters! Each is fleshed out, each is marvelously complex. Razujmikhin, the talkative, gregarious, good-hearted, insecure and destitute student; Sonia, the tragic child-prostitute, with a sense of rightness in the world; Petrovich, the self-important, self-made man, completely out of touch with his own humanity; Dunia, the honorable, wronged sister: we feel like we know these people because we've met people like them. They fit within our understanding of the way human beings are.
Dostoyevsky also displays great insight into human nature. Svidrigailov, for example, talks of his wife as liking to be offended. "We all like to be offended," he says, "but she in particular loved to be offended." It suddenly struck me how true this is. It gives us a chance to act indignantly, to lash out at our enemies, to gain favor with our allies. I don't believe I've ever seen this thought expressed in literature before. In fact, it never occurred to me in real life! Petrovich, Dunia's suitor, not only expects to be loved, but because of his money, and her destitution, he expects to be adored! To be worshipped! He intentionally sought out a woman from whome he expected to get this, and is comletely flummoxed when she rejects him. His is an unusual character, but completely realized.
There is so much more to talk about: the character of Raskolnikov, which is meticulously and carefully revealed; the sense of isolation which descends on him after committing his crime; the cat and mouse game played on him by the police detective. I could go on and on. I haven't even mentioned the historical and social context in which this takes place. Suffice to say this is a very rich book.
Do not expect it to be a rip-roaring page turner. Sit down, relax, take your time, and savor it. It will be a very rewarding experience. And thank you SL, for recommending it.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen My Favorite Novel of All Time, 19. September 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Crime and Punishment (Taschenbuch)
I love Dostoevsky, which is something of a curse. I read Crime and Punishment 13 years ago, and have spent the following years looking for something akin to this book.
Dostoevsky has the rare gift of not just writing; but truly entering the mind of his subjects; every psychological nuance. Every fear; the paranoia, guilt, hatred, persecutiion, and angst of tortured souls (Maybe it was his stay in Siberia that shaped him).
Everyone should read this book. It's an open letter about the human condition. Then read The Brothers Karamozov; then The Idiot.
It's not happy reading. It's literature with soul. Someday I'll find a writer this good. Until then, I'll keep rereading Dostoevsky and continue the search.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Mind Warped, 27. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Crime and Punishment (Taschenbuch)
There's no need to go into detailing this classic pshycological study on a warped individual. It covers the full spectrum of emotions, from inner strenghts to utter indifference. Throw in an intelligent detective that uses these same feelings to trap the murderer, a good hearted friend, two loving women, and of course the dreary setting of mid nineteenth century Russia and you have a well written and thought provoking novel. The long critisized ending also provides for a somewhat positive ending. A sequel would have been quite interesting. Dostoevsky uses somewhat similar characters and emotions in his other classic, "The Brothers Karamazov" If you enjoy a study into the inner mind with some interesting outcomes you would do well to read both of these important works.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Raskolnikov does not let down....., 25. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Crime and Punishment (Taschenbuch)
This book is one of the best existential pieces that I have read. Dostoevsky enhances the reader's understanding of the human psyche at the edge of it wits. But as you read you start to indeed wonder if this is a time of abnormality for young Raskolnikov or is it a possibility that all of us have the capability of thinking and acting in a like-minded fashion? As time breathes an air of consistency, Raskolnikov is dependent on his wits, but as externalities seize his attention he begins to meander into the abyss of social ingratitude.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Great book, no doubt about it, 18. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Crime and Punishment (Taschenbuch)
First of all, this is one kind of book that reader can feel sad finishing it. Second of all, it's not really fair for me to review this book since others were much more concise than i, but i will give it a shot and tell you what i feel about the book (after all, that's what a review is for).
Ok, the subject of this book is: how a intelligent man plot a crime, execute a crime and how he will pay. It's actually a brilliant study of a crime, it's so intriguing and heart pumping. The mood is so dark and sad, i felt traped by the acts of the protagonist, a claustrophobic sensation. The characters were so belivable that i couldn't question their acts and thougts as real. The evolving relations between the characters, their psicological description, the constant tension and, above all, the mental changes that went through the protagonist mind kept me reading this book non-stop.
All in all, this is a masterfull piece of work, worth the time reading (and re-reading) and worth the space in the bookshelf. My only advice: buy it !
PS: i percieved some sort of religious message behind all the plot (not that big a deal), but of course i might be quite mad...
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5.0 von 5 Sternen hemingway's hero, 15. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Crime and Punishment (Taschenbuch)
Dostoevsky was one of hemingway's favorite authors. That's interesting. One russian and another american. And i think some psychological perspectives of these two writers complement each other. This is a story about a man tormented with guilt. Hemingway himself expressed these same problems (even in his real life). So why does one reviewer refer to «crime and punishment» in the terms of «blah, blah, boring, written in napkins», and then sends a book by John Steinbeck into the stratosphere?) I think that if you read «Crime and Punishment» you'll see why many americans think they are a little above everyone else. Our conscience doesn't always lead us where we want to go. Just like the hero in Dostoevsky's book. A good book seems to be always alive. But... what more can I say?... I recommend it to anyone who apreciates a masterpiece. Be it american or russian. By the way, i'm not either one.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Greatest - no contest....., 14. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Crime and Punishment (Taschenbuch)
The greatest novel of all time was written over a hundred years ago in Russia, by a man few would probably want to spend more than five minutes in the local with. The novel is very, very long, often goes round in circles seemingly nowhere and is infused with a deep religious code that betrays our current vogue for post christian, post socialst malaise. The basic jist of the story is familiar to anybody with a penchant for the t.v series 'Cracker' or the odd Sherlock Holmes novel. So why I hear you cry is it consistently lauded as the greatest story ever told? Simple really, when (and it really is only a matter of when) you read this book to the final page you will never the see the world again through the same eyes. For anybody wishing to foist another piece of literature on us the unsuspecting public, read this book first and then think..... Could you really explain the world we live in any better? Would you not just be repeating something that has already been written? Something with a far greater understanding, deeper compassion? Writing that not only tells us about man's eternal conflict with himself and his brothers, but through beautifully honest prose teaches us that this conflict is actually what makes man seperate from other beings. And then think again, my friend for we have enough books gathering dust on our libary shelves, but we only have one 'Crime And Punishment'
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