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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen thoroughly enjoyable and introspective
!Correction! Frankenstein is the name of the scientist - the monster that he creates is nameless and is referred to usually as a "demon" Moving onwards....
If you have ever sat down to watch a horror movie from anything dating back to the 80s or earlier, it is usually for the purpose of getting a few laughs (those are special effects?!?),but the horror in...
Veröffentlicht am 17. April 1998 von Ilina (anili@juno.com)

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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Typical novel from the romantic period
"Frankenstein" is a typical novel from the romantic period. The story is based on the conflict of a scientist with the results of his work. But Frankenstein is far more than that: It is the story of two individuals (Frankenstein and his "monster") and their acceptance and behavior in society, and of course, the novel contains a lot of latent...
Veröffentlicht am 12. Juni 2000 von J. Enders


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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Typical novel from the romantic period, 12. Juni 2000
Von 
J. Enders "jenders" (Darmstadt) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
"Frankenstein" is a typical novel from the romantic period. The story is based on the conflict of a scientist with the results of his work. But Frankenstein is far more than that: It is the story of two individuals (Frankenstein and his "monster") and their acceptance and behavior in society, and of course, the novel contains a lot of latent psychological information (what would Freud have said about that?). However, it is typical for the age of romanticism that the feelings and thoughts of the individuum are at the center of the plot (see e.g. the works by Byron or by the German authors Eichendorff and Novalis). This holds as well for the music composed during that time (Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, ...). Mary Shelley describes in great detail the innermost feelings of Frankenstein and his "wretch" and how they changed from one minute to the other, and what made them change their moods, and why and how, and who was around etc. This actually - because presented through the entire book - makes the reading of the highly interesting story rather tedious. Story: 5 stars, Fun: 1 star
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen “Cursed, cursed creator.”, 4. März 2006
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Frankenstein (Taschenbuch)
Victor grew up reading the works of Paracelsus, Agrippa, and Albertus Magnus, the alchemists of the time. Toss in a little natural philosophy (sciences) and you have the making of a monster. Or at least a being that after being spurned for looking ugly becomes ugly. So for revenge the creature decides unless Victor makes another (female this time) creature, that Victor will also suffer the loss of friends and relatives. What is victor to do? Bow to the wishes and needs of his creation? Or challenge it to the death? What would you do?
Although the concept of the monster is good, and the conflicts of the story well thought out, Shelly suffers from the writing style of the time. Many people do not finish the book as the language is stilted and verbose for example when was the last time you said, “Little did I then expect the calamity that was in a few moments to overwhelm me and extinguish in horror and despair all fear of ignominy of death.”
Much of the book seems like travel log filler. More time describing the surroundings of Europe than the reason for traveling or just traveling. Many writers use traveling to reflect time passing or the character growing in stature or knowledge. In this story they just travel a lot.
This book is definitely worth plodding through for moviegoers. The record needs to be set strait. First shock is that the creator is named Victor Frankenstein; the creature is just “monster” not Frankenstein. And it is Victor that is backwards which added in him doing the impossible by not knowing any better. The monster is well read in “Sorrows of a Young Werther,” “Paradise Lost,” and Plutarch’s “Lives.” The debate (mixed with a few murders) rages on as to whether the monster was doing evil because of his nature or because he was spurned?
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen thoroughly enjoyable and introspective, 17. April 1998
!Correction! Frankenstein is the name of the scientist - the monster that he creates is nameless and is referred to usually as a "demon" Moving onwards....
If you have ever sat down to watch a horror movie from anything dating back to the 80s or earlier, it is usually for the purpose of getting a few laughs (those are special effects?!?),but the horror in the book is quite tangible. The most fascinating aspect of the novel is the transformation of the monster - initially the reader is repulsed at the creature, and then as they learn the monster's biography, humanitarian feelings of pity and of sympathy is all that the monster deserves. Hatred towards Frankenstein grows - due to his selfish thirst for knowledge, the downfall of him, his family, and his creation is inevitable. Easy to read, Shelley's descriptive language and moving plot keep the reader continually turning the pages to discover the next twist. Told in frames, Frankenstein is a classic - the origin of all horror.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen A Hard Sell, 3. Mai 2000
Despite many strengths, Frankenstein has fatal flaws. Coleridge wrote that readers must approach a novel with "a willing suspension of disbelief," a willingness in turn nurtured by the novelist. Such suspension is required of readers because they must understand that a novelist cannot represent everything. Part of the novelist's art lies in the simulation of reality through selective withholding and revealing of various information. Conversely, novelists lose readers when they ask them to suspend disbelief too often, or to accept details or events that just do not logically seem to make sense. Such is the case of Mary Shelley and her creation, Victor Frankenstein.
Unlike its portrayal in the movies, which involves an assistant (Igor), various trips to the cemetery for body parts, and a lightning-filled climax in a laboratory, creation of Frankenstein's monster is anti-climactic. Shelley dispatches the entire incident in about three paragraphs. Just as quickly, Frankenstein is repulsed by his creation. The creature opens his eyes, Frankenstein sees its ugliness, and flees - all in the space of two or three sentences. Thus begins a slippery slope of disbelief.
Readers are expected to believe that the creature could evolve into a perfect example of cultured, Enlightened, rational thinking simply by observing a simple family and reading a handful of books. The monster's inner being is too perfect. It is inconceivable that his rhetoric, designed to make the reader sympathetic, cannot also appeal to Frankenstein. And Frankenstein himself is too blind. Once he is finally rebuked, the monster vows to avenge himself upon Frankenstein. He systematically murders members of Frankenstein's family and friends. The entire object of the murders is to make Frankenstein suffer as the monster has suffered. Thus, it is impossible that when the monster promises to be with Frankenstein on his wedding night, that Frankenstein takes extreme measures to protect himself while not even for a moment looking to his wife's safety. It's simply too much to believe.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen 3.5 stars, actually., 11. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
All right, I agree, Frankenstein is a very tedious book to read. It's repetitive, rambling and very often, boring. The term "miserable wretch" can be found practically every two pages, Shelley likes to have her characters write marathon-length letters to each other and the good Dr. Frankenstein has a tendency to go staring at mountains for chapters at a time. If you can ignore all these imperfections, Frankenstein truly is a rare gem indeed. It has withstood the test of time by infecting many-a-generation with the vision of a solitary, man-made creature and his tortured creator. More movies and books have been created around Shelley's idea's than I have fingers. A tour down a local CVS during Halloween will yield you with at least five different "Frankenstein" costumes to pick from. Frankenstein is a part of our culture. Media and commercialism aside, Frankenstein also has a lot to say about our science as well. I honestly can't think of any other fiction book that expressed the same concern for the state of bio-technology and ethics than this novel. Worried about test-tube babies? Human testing? Cloning? This book has it all. And to add more icing to the cake, this book was one of the first to worry about it. Sure, the text might be unrefined. But the idea itself is worth the 233 pages, and enough to make me give this book a 3.5 on the rating scale.. Read this book when you have the spare time, you'll be pleasantly surprised!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Victor is the real monster!, 19. Mai 1999
Mary Shelley's classic book has often been regarded as the first science fiction novel. Brian Aldiss has referred to it as the first novel of the Scientific Revolution. It should be required reading of any college or college-bound student. The version I read was the original 1818 edition. In 1831, Mary Shelley made a number of changes (but, nothing of great import; for example, in the 1831 version Elizabeth is no longer Victor's cousin). I did read the author's new introduction to the 1831 edition however. This introduction is well done. In this novel, written in the epistolary form, a young (age 21) student at the University of Ingolstadt, Victor Frankenstein, discovers the method of imparting life to inanimate tissue. He uses his skills to construct a creature and to give it life. The creature's and Victor's lives are intertwined and the reader can detect much of Mary Shelley's early life as well. Her mother (i.e., her creator) died a few days after her birth. The female act of creation and its results is an aspect of this novel. Others have pointed out that this is a true female novel. Although, the monster "inspires loathing" in all who see him, I came to the conclusion that the real villian in this story was Victor Frankenstein. He allows his own creation to control him.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Read it for the concepts, not the writing, 30. August 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Frankenstein (Gebundene Ausgabe)
What does God owe us, his Creation? What are the responsibilities of parents towards their children? How should society treat its homeless, creations of its own policies? What happens when scientists (or even entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, politicians) pursue a single-minded goal of glory and wonder without stopping to think on the consequences?

All of these interesting and relevant issues are raised in this plodding, poorly written work. The standards of interesting writing may have changed in the last hundreds of years, but some writers and poets are skilled enough with language that their work still endures. Don't be misled by the hype; Mary Shelley should not be remembered for her literary skill. I hope that no schoolchildren actually have to read this. There are enough great works that are enjoyable to read. Frankenstein should be classified as a work of philosophy, not one of literature.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Klassiker, 24. April 2014
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Frankenstein (Penguin Classics) (Taschenbuch)
Dieses Buch gehört wohl zu den Klassikern der englischen Literatur. Es ist die Geschichte von Dr. Frankenstein und dem von ihm aus Leichenteilen erschaffenen Monster das zum Leben erweckt wird. Das Buch selbst ist in 3 volumes eingeteilt, die in sich nochmal durch Kapitel gegliedert sind. Die 3 Teile entsprechen den Sichtweisen einer Person auf das selbe Geschehen. Dadurch gewinnt die Handlung meiner Meinung nach auch an Tiefe, weil es sie viel deutlicher hervorhebt. Ich mag diese Ausgabe wegen der ausführlichen Einleitung. Sie versorgt den Leser mit Hintergrundinformationen rund um Mary Shelley, ihr Leben, ihre Werke und wie es dazu kam, dass sie dieses Buch geschrieben hat. Für jeden, der an mehr, als der Geschichte von Dr. Frankenstein und seinem Monster interessiert ist, kann ich eine definitive Kaufempfehlung aussprechen.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Lang, überdreht, und doch ein Klassiker, 9. November 2014
Von 
Serenus Zeitblom (Köln, Europa) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 100 REZENSENT)   
Mary Shelley, aus der Godwin-Wollstonecraft-Familie, schuf vor rund zwei Jahrhunderten einen Klassiker, den wenige im ungekürzten Original gelesen haben dürften, und ich auch erst jetzt. "Frankenstein" ist darin übrigens der Erfinder, nicht das (namenlose) Monster. Und auch Stromschalter mit lispelsabberndem Igor daneben entstammen den vielen Filmversionen und nicht dem Original.

Die eigentliche zentrale Geschichte von Schöpfer und Monster ist aus verschiedenen Perspektiven zu hören, einschließlich einer anderen moralischen Mantelhandlung und so manchem Nebenher. Teils wird das sehr unplausibel. Weitere Themen sind eine Einsamkeit des Monsters, die geradezu theologisch-philosophische Frage von Schöpfer und Geschöpf, Herr und Sklave samt ihrem Gut und Böse und die Entwicklung des menschlichen Bewusstseins. Man mag für Frankenstein nach persönlichem Belieben Frau, Schwarzer, Diener, Osama, Kind, Tier, Mensch, Computer oder Alter Ego einsetzen, wenn man das Buch symbolisch aufladen will. Wer freilich Schocker-booor-voll-Horror-ey-der-Zombie-dingdong sucht, wäre hier leider falsch.

Sprachlich hat Marys Gatte damals angeblich noch einmal nachpoliert. Der Text hat Spaß am Fremdwort (ok) und am übersteigerten Romantiktralala (schon schwerer zu ertragene 'Mädchenschreibe'), länglich ausgebreitet. Die Anklänge an Coleridges Dauerlamento vom Albatros sind arg unüberhörbar. Oh! Miserable wretch! Oh!

Da bin ich als heutiger Leser einfach weniger die Zielgruppe als überdreht seufzende Jünglinge und Damen der damaligen Gesellschaft. Mit Schulkenntnissen bereits und den Vokabelhinweisen unter dem Text ist alles sehr gut verständliches Englisch, dennoch wirklich nicht das, was man sich selbst zum Vorbild nehmen sollte.

Zur Ausgabe also noch: seltenere Vokabeln und kleinere inhaltliche Erläuterungen stehen unter dem Text. Manchmal fehlen einzelne Vokabelangaben definitiv außerhalb des Grundwortschatzes, doch es lässt sich dann selbst zusammenreimen. Auch Einleitendes zu Autorin und ihrem Werk (in der nachgearbeiteten 1831er-Fassung) ist gegeben. Die Reclamausgaben sind für so etwas unter meinen Lieblingen, und weil sie so schön kompakt und mitnehmbar sind.

Fazit: Klassiker auch aufgrund seines Nachhalls, und ich bereue das Lesen nicht. Doch dass modernere Versionen den Stoff deutlich eindampften, kann ich auch gut verstehen. Drei bis vier Sterne.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen An entertaining look at ethical issues, 11. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is an interesting, enjoyable, and thought provoking novel, depicting the consequences of one immoral decision on the behalf of Dr. Victor Frankenstein. Frankenstein is then faced with whether or not to create a second monster to appease the first, which has already killed his brother in his fury. This second decision, which he saw as a choice between his family and the human race, was what angered the originally kind-hearted creature and turned him to a path of evil and revenge. While the story of Frankenstein is commonly thought to involve an evil "monster," I particularly liked that either the doctor or the creature (or both) could be seen as evil. Frankenstein had sought fame in the ability to bring one back from the dead but he never paused to consider the moral implications of his actions. Abandoning his creation, Victor saw only evil in his creature and, blaming him for the death of his brother, vowed revenge. Victor would not sympathize with the creature's hard life and refused to grant him one request that would end, or so he promised, his evil doings. Similarly, the creature entered the world with a good heart and had intentions only of helping others. He wanted nothing more than acceptance and love, but people were unable to see beyond his hideous appearance. After being shunned by the human race, the creature vowed revenge on the person who had cursed him with life, his creator. Once Frankenstein refused him a companion, and with it, any chance of happiness or love, the creature vowed to make Frankenstein pay for his selfishness. Mary Shelley's story is captivating and intriguing; it portrays the classic horror story plot in an enjoyable manner with emphasis on the issue of who is "right" and "good", and what the responsibilities of Frankenstein, as the creator should be to his monster.
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