Fashion Sale Hier klicken Fußball Fan-Artikel 30 Tage lang gratis testen Cloud Drive Photos Erste Wahl Learn More Pimms roesle Hier klicken Fire Shop Kindle PrimeMusic Autorip Summer Sale 16

Kundenrezensionen

1,8 von 5 Sternen4
1,8 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
0
4 Sterne
1
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Stern
3
Format: Kindle Edition|Ändern
Preis:7,99 €

Ihre Bewertung(Löschen)Ihre Bewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 6. Dezember 2005
My issues with this book are not just the large number of mistakes which the author could have taken the time to correct. Another issue is the hostile response he and his publisher made when these errors were pointed out. NO book can be called "good" regardless of how well the author writes - slipshod research will negate everything else.
Sometimes errors get by even the best researcher. In this case, it looks like there was no fact checking done. It is not the editors' job to correct and catch mistakes. That is the author's job and in most cases editors are not necessarily experts on the subjects they are editing.
Still, one would hope for better from an author than telling people who have caught the mistakes to "get an enema and a life." That sounds crass and unprofessional. On December 5, 2005, Rusy & Molloy's column in the NY Daily News defends the book by saying Beatle fans "don't like it because it doesn't paint a pretty picture of John." That is not true. Our issue with it is that it is full of needless mistakes that were easily checked. We don't need to put any Beatle on a pedastal, just give us some truth. If a writer cares about the subject, then that writer will take the time to check the facts and not blame others for catching the errors.
0Kommentar|4 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 4. November 2005
This book is rife with errors that are so glaring it makes you wonder how on earth this got past the editor's desk. This is just EMBARRASSING! The Beatle Literati are not pleased with this book AT ALL! This is definitely NOT the work of a Paperback Writer!
Allow me to itemize some of the more glaring mistakes, an extensive list of which have also been compiled by people directly involved with a well-known Beatle magazine. Again, the mistakes in this book are ludicrous and inexcusable!
*There are photographs of the Beatles taken in 1960, supposedly at the Star Club. That is impossible because the Star Club did not open until 1962!
*Erroneous captions - the Top Ten Club is mistakenly listed as the Star Club in some photographs taken in 1961.
*Date errors, such as when George Harrison met Pattie Boyd. The pair met in 1964 on the set of "A Hard Day's Night" and NOT in 1963 as is claimed in this book! Paul's 21st birthday was in 1963 and at that time, George and Pattie had never even met.
*Another error in re George and Pattie is in a photograph saying they met during the filming of the 1965 movie, "Help!" That is incorrect. They met in 1964 on the set of "A Hard Day's Night."
*A king sized error can be found in the 1964 photograph of John mugging with somebody's daughter in Central Park. His own son, Julian was then 10 months old and was in England during the Beatles' first whirlwind tour of America!
*The photograph of the Beatles on Ed Sullivan is erroneously captioned as being their last appearance on his show in August of 1965. NOT TRUE! That picture was taken during their February 1964 performances. The 1965 Ed Sullivan performance was filmed on August 14, 1965, one day before the famous first Shea Stadium concert and was aired on September 12, 1965.
There are more, but I think you have gotten the idea. How on earth this got past the editors I will never know. If that isn't bad enough, there are plenty of mistakes throughout the text as well. Beatle literati will pick them up right off the bat. I don't know if these errors were allowed through with the thought that they would remain unnoticed, but the errors were extensive to the point where I just cannot recommend this book.
0Kommentar|6 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 12. Mai 2006
I find it interesting that this book was "Edited down from a staggering 2,700 pages" because I kept thinking that "The Beatles: The Biography" was not long enough. Part of that was because when you get to the end Paul spills the beans, John gets mad, and that is the end. George and Ringo have nothing to say. Bob Spitz's endnote is a single paragraph that runs more than a page that covers the release of the "Let It Be" album in a half sentence. Their last #1 song, "The Long and Winding Road," is ignored (although the saccharine overdose provided by Phil Spector's orchestration certainly contributed to McCartney's decision to bolt) and the obituaries to come are more prominent than the musical successes (even though Lennon with "Imagine," Lennon finally writes a song more powerful than McCartney's "Yesterday"). Spitz tells of the boys before they were the Beatles, and corresponding chapters at the end would be nice.

This biography gets off to a better start, beginning in media res, with a prologue on December 27, 1960, set at the Christmas dance at the Litherland town hall when the group opened their set with "Long Tall Sally," concluded with a rousing version of "What'd I Say," and that night, according to Spitz, "they had become the Beatles." The contents are divided into three sections: Mercy (Chapters 1-20) begins with Liverpool and the birth of John Lennon, and ends with "Please Please Me" making it to #1 on the British pop charts. Mania (Chapters 21-28) starts with the Beatles becoming a national rather than northern phenomenon and takes us to the decision to name an album "Rubber Soul." Mastery (Chapters 29-37) begins with "Rubber Soul" breaking everything open and ends with the Beatles broken up.

The prologue is certainly captivating, and it ends up focusing the book more on the process of becoming than what happened on the way down. But then we know more about the story of the Beatles once they were the Beatles, so that sifting through the legends and the doctored autobiographies to make the case for what really happened is obviously of more interest. Spitz focuses as much on the hard work as the rampant creativity, and if you had an idea the Beatles were an overnight sensation this biography certainly dispels that notion. We get the backgrounds on Paul, George, Ringo and Brian Epstein as they join the band, so instead of trying to deal with parallel stories Spitz adds new threads to the weave.

The middle part of the book suffers in comparison because of the attention to how everything came together. For me the fascinating part during the glory days is how they put together their albums, especially the landmark efforts of "Rubber Soul," "Revolver" and "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band." Spitz could double the amount of time he spends on those albums and made me happy, but then you can always reference something like Steve Turner's "A Hard Day's Write" if you want to check out the stories behind every Beatles song. If there is anything Spitz proves with this 984-page literary doorstop is that no single volume history of the Beatles is coming to be truly comprehensive, but his effort should forestall a multi-volume treatise for some time. Depending on how your interests vary from others, you will certainly find sections of the book to gloss over before Spitz gets back to what you consider to be the good parts.

The last act is rather disheartening and Spitz presents a series of fights and angry exchanges that actually make you want them to break up just to put themselves out of their collective misery. In retrospect it is amazing they kept things going on the edge for as long as they did, and Spitz makes no real effort to work out the contradictions between words and actions at this point in the history of the Beatles, although I doubt anybody on the outside could get further than the idea they were committed to each other out of habit and economics. As a writer Spitz does tend to interject himself a bit too much at times, getting a bit too cute now and again. But he does do a good job of rendering verdicts on key moments: for example, he makes it clear that when the other Beatles let John bring Yoko Ono into the Abbey Road studio, that is essentially the point of no return. There are eight-plus pages of notes in the back, along with eleven pages of bibliography, a discography and an index, so you can double check facts to your heart's content. Getting through this is a bit of a chore, but at least you can play appropriate albums (and songs) as you go merrily along.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 15. November 2005
This book is rife with errors that are so glaring it makes you wonder how on earth this got past the editor's desk. This is just EMBARRASSING! The Beatle Literati are not pleased with this book AT ALL! This is definitely NOT the work of a Paperback Writer!
Allow me to itemize some of the more glaring mistakes, an extensive list of which have also been compiled by people directly involved with a well-known Beatle magazine. Again, the mistakes in this book are ludicrous and inexcusable!
*There are photographs of the Beatles taken in 1960, supposedly at the Star Club. That is impossible because the Star Club did not open until 1962!
*Erroneous captions - the Top Ten Club is mistakenly listed as the Star Club in some photographs taken in 1961.
*Date errors, such as when George Harrison met Pattie Boyd. The pair met in 1964 on the set of "A Hard Day's Night" and NOT in 1963 as is claimed in this book! Paul's 21st birthday was in 1963 and at that time, George and Pattie had never even met.
*Another error in re George and Pattie is in a photograph saying they met during the filming of the 1965 movie, "Help!" That is incorrect. They met in 1964 on the set of "A Hard Day's Night."
*A king sized error can be found in the 1964 photograph of John mugging with somebody's daughter in Central Park. His own son, Julian was then 10 months old and was in England during the Beatles' first whirlwind tour of America!
*The photograph of the Beatles on Ed Sullivan is erroneously captioned as being their last appearance on his show in August of 1965. NOT TRUE! That picture was taken during their February 1964 performances. The 1965 Ed Sullivan performance was filmed on August 14, 1965, one day before the famous first Shea Stadium concert and was aired on September 12, 1965.
*The 1965 "Rubber Soul" album was reported as having "an unheard of 14 cuts." Not true. At that time, all of the Beatles' UK albums had 14 cuts save for "A Hard Day's Night," which had 13.
*"Run For Your Life" was not the last song recorded for "Rubber Soul." It was the very first.
There are more, but I think you have gotten the idea. How on earth this got past the editors I will never know. If that isn't bad enough, there are plenty of mistakes throughout the text as well. If you listen to this as a recording, you just get the textual mistakes. Beatle literati will pick them up right off the bat. I don't know if these errors were allowed through with the thought that they would remain unnoticed, but the errors were extensive to the point where I just cannot recommend this.
0Kommentar|Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden

Haben sich auch diese Artikel angesehen

13,33 €
6,66 €

Gesponserte Links

  (Was ist das?)