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5.0 von 5 Sternen Elegy for the jazz age
Although published seventy-five years ago, Fitzgerald's masterpiece remains as fresh as the day it appeared. It could have been written yesterday. It is as perfect a novel as one is likely to find in American literature; not a word is wrong or out of place. The choice of a second person narrator gives the reader wider and greater appreciation of the characters and...
Veröffentlicht am 17. Juli 2000 von Randall Ivey

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2.0 von 5 Sternen the only good thing about it was its simplicity
Even though I only had to read this for school, I can tell you one thing through my forced reading: the only good thing about this book was that I could read it fast. Fitzgerald puts across some good points, but the book left me without the feeling of having been there and only with images of what happened. He did not do a very good job of emphasizing the important...
Veröffentlicht am 19. Januar 2000 von Dr. Nancy Williams


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5.0 von 5 Sternen Face it -- this IS one of the best books ever written, 2. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Great Gatsby (Taschenbuch)
Looking over the other responses, I have to include my own two cents and agree with the reviewer who said that anyone who gave this book less than 4 stars is completely oblivious. I first read this book about 15 years ago - when I was 14 and had to read it for my junior high English class. At that time, I too didn't "get" the book, thought it was boring, and couldn't see what all the hype was about. Then I re-read it a few years ago. I was simply amazed at how well-crafted, insightful, and yet SUBTLE the book is. The reviewer who remarked that GG's structure is flawed is especially misguided and probably didn't pay enough attention while reading. In fact, the structure of this book is pretty close to being perfect. The reviewer thought the narration of the events through the point of view of the neighbor is a "crutch" and a worn-out device. Not so! The WHOLE POINT of the novel is NOT, in fact, Gatsby's pursuit of Daisy, as everyone seems to think, but the question: who IS Jay Gatsby? Not only literally, i.e., what is his identity, but also figuratively, who IS he as a person. The story is remarkable in that we never see Gatsby directly; instead, his character is filtered through the views of the people around him. Therefore, the narration of the neighbor fits in perfectly with the overarching theme of the novel: he is left to sort out his impressions of Gatsby much in the same way that the reader is. If the story were told from Gatsby's point of view, we would get too close, know too much about him, and the entire effect would be ruined. As it stands, however, the novel becomes a comment on identity: who we really are, and how other people perceive or misperceive us. (I won't spoil the ending for those who haven't read the book yet, but once you do read it, make this connection and you'll see how perfect the structure is.) That other reviewer also made the comment that a great work of art should cause us to think, question ourselves, etc., etc. GG does exactly this, but as I pointed out, Fitzgerald's technique is very subtle - with the result that some of the nuances may be lost on inattentive readers. To those who gave the novel less than four stars: read it again, and this time pay attention and look beyond the surface!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Review of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, 12. März 1999
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Great Gatsby (Taschenbuch)
Review of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby
F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby was written during the time of the roaring twenties. The novel has many themes, but the most dominating one is the death of the American Dream which died because of Jay Gatsby's involvement in organized crime. Nick Carraway is the narrator of the story. The story starts when he [Nick] is leaving the Mid-West to start a new life in New York. There is where he meets Jay Gatsby, who is a rich man and the protagonist of the novel. Gatsby is in love with Daisy Buchannan, who is coincidentally Nick's cousin. Even though Daisy is married to a man named Tom Buchanan, she is very much in love with Gatsby. Tom is the bad guy in the story or the antagonist. Tom is having an affair with a lady named Myrtle Wilson. He treats Myrtle very badly, but she puts up with it because of his wealth. Myrtle is married to George Wilson who is the hard luck guy in the novel who in the end takes out his revenge on someone that did not deserve it. Jordan Baker is the woman in brings Gatsby to Nick and consequently Gatsby to his long lost love Daisy. In the end it is revealed that Gatsby and Daisy are very much in love. When Tom finds out about this he gets very upset and tells George Wilson that Gatsby is having an affair with his wife. Raged, Wilson goes and murders Gatsby for something he did not do. The story ends tragicically because Myrtle and George are all killed in violently. Fitzgerald's main purpose of writing this novel was to briefly describe what it was like in the 1920's. In the critical essays that I read it seems that Fitzgerald's purpose in writing the essay was to relate himself to Gatsby. Gatsby is described as Fitzgerald which I don't believe is right because he [Gatsby] is described as the "victim" in the story when really he is not.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A not-so-often-acknowleged meaning of The Great Gatsby, 19. Dezember 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Great Gatsby (Taschenbuch)
As I was reading through the other reviews, I noticed something. Nobody was able
to really say "why" they liked the book. The reason (as I believe it
to be) is that the Gatsby shows characteristics that we all
have inside of ourselves, that all our descendants will have, and that all our
ancestors had. We all have
a yearning to return to the past and to avoid the mistakes that we made. To return to the
Garden, and avoid giving into temptation. To find a new land
(i.e. America) and have a new beginning (as the dutch sailors
tried to do and as Gatsby fails at). We all believe in the Myth of Edenic possibilities
(the belief that one can return to his/her past and avoid the
mistakes that they made) and so does Gatsby. But that's not the
entire reason readers are fascinated with Gatsby. Throughout the entire novel, F. Scott
Fitzgerald debunks the American Dream of going west to start
over. He does so by having Gatsby go east, and making it so
that he can't be successful without going outside the law. But throughout the novel,
Gatsby never gives up. He's like the man who was standing
in the trash after one of Gatsby's parties. Just as this man
refused to acknowlege that he couldn't live in the past, so Gatsby refuses. Gatsby refuses to
acknowlege that he can't go back to when he first met Daisy, before she married
Tom. There is a lot more to this book than what others have
said, and there is still a lot more than what I have outlined. Although, I hope that this
will allow some people to realize that The Great
Gatsby is more than just a love story between two people. Every
time I read it (I've read it at least 5 times), I pick up new symbols and archetypes
which allow me to see this masterpiece through new lenses.
It truly is an American Classic, which everyone should read.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Symbolreiches gesellschaftskritisches Meisterwerk, 20. April 2001
Von Ein Kunde
Dieses dramatische Kultwerk von F. Scott Fitzgerald beschreibt den Aufstieg und Fall des "großen Gatsby" im Amerika der ausgehenden 20er Jahre. Eine meisterhafte Schilderung der Gesellschaft dieser Epoche wird in wunderschönen Bildern, Symbolen und Personen charakterisiert, so dass auch heute noch mühelos ein Bezug zu dem Plot hergestellt werden kann.
Unbedingt empfehlenswert !
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Mesmerizing, spectacular...everyone should read this book!, 1. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Great Gatsby (Taschenbuch)
Yes, this is a classic, but not everyone was required to read it in school. I wish I had been, since I would have discovered a wonderful, heart-wrenching, beautifully written novel much sooner than now, when I am in my late twenties. This book made me feel so much emotion, and every word Fitzgerald uses is brilliantly perfect. The story is very compelling as well, and it drew me in so much that I did not put it down on the second day I read it (the beginning drags just a tiny bit--keep reading! ) for a full eight hours until I finished it. If you have never read it thus far, DO...for the women, it has a touching, tear-jerking love story, and for men, all the violence and egotism you've come to expect from a good read. EVERYONE should read this excellent piece of literature.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen the only good thing about it was its simplicity, 19. Januar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Great Gatsby (Taschenbuch)
Even though I only had to read this for school, I can tell you one thing through my forced reading: the only good thing about this book was that I could read it fast. Fitzgerald puts across some good points, but the book left me without the feeling of having been there and only with images of what happened. He did not do a very good job of emphasizing the important points, and I'm afraid I missed some of them. I would only recommend this book if your intent is a long-term study of writers of the 20th century.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Vom Amerikanischen (Alp-)Traum..., 7. November 2008
"The Great Gatsby" - reich, umschwärmt, schmeißt die rauschendsten Partys - ein Self-Made-Millionär-Leben, das sich viele andere Menschen in Amerika auch erträumt haben, aber führt er auch ein glückliches Leben?

Fitzgerald zeichnet ein verwischtes Portrait von einem undurchschaubaren Gatsby aus der Sicht von Gatsby's Nachbarn. Besonders diese Erzählperspektive und die dadurch immer erst hinterher einleuchtenden Situationen zeichnen dieses Werk der Weltliteratur aus!

Fazit: Absolut lesenswert!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Money Can't Buy Happiness, 6. März 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Great Gatsby (Taschenbuch)
Supreme Court Judge, Oliver Wendell Holmes, once said, "In my thirty years of legal experience, I have never witnessed money helping a victim, although I have seen it pretending to help them." In F. Scott Fitzgerald's American masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, the main character, Jay Gatsby attempts to rekindle his long-lost romantic relationship with Daisy Buchanan, by flaunting his newfound wealth and success. During the time Gatsby and Daisy were apart, Gatsby works for and attains the American Dream-wealth and success. Despite this, Gatsby feels like he lacks love. Thus, he moves to Long Island and takes up residence across the bay from Daisy in the hopes that Daisy will become attracted to him and love him because of his wealth. By describing vivid settings and relationships and by displaying ever-changing tones throughout The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald educates the reader about the myth that money fixes problems of the heart, social problems and past problems. Fitzgerald paints a portrait of 1920's social status by pointing differences between the residences of Gatsby and the Buchanan's. Gatsby represents "new money" and lives on the less exclusive West Egg, Long Island. Tom and Daisy Buchanan represent "old money" and live on the more exclusive East Egg, Long Island. In addition to separating the "Eggs" by social status, the homes of Gatsby and the Buchanan's differ as well. The Buchanan's live in an older, more traditional estate. "Their house was even more elaborate than I expected, a cheerful red and white Georgian colonial mansion overlooking the bay" (11). On the other hand, Gatsby's mansion is a newer home that, "...was a factual imitation Hotel de Ville in Normandy, with a tower on one side, sparkling new under a thin beard of raw ivy..." (9). Case in point, the "old money" like the Buchanan's, frown upon Gatsby's "new money." Love and the problems it causes presents itself as the major theme in Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. The love of Gatsby and Daisy, as superficial as it seems, has a definite possibility of working out. When Gatsby does not return from the Great War, Daisy decides to marry Tom, a man of money and social status. Daisy gets caught up in society and thinks that Tom enables her to live a dream, "For Daisy was young and her artificial world was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful snobbery and orchestras which set the rhythm of the year..." (158). Consequently, Daisy marries Tom and they climb the summit of the social mountain. However her relationship with Tom proves void of love. Tom fills this void with his mistress, Myrtle, who also finds discontent in her marriage. In fact one character relates the mismatched pairs, "...why go on living with them if they can't stand them? If I was them I'd get a divorce and get married to each other right away" (37). Fitzgerald portrays wealth and social status as false guarantees of success in love. The tone of The Great Gatsby reveals itself through an endless parade of parties and social occasions, which make the reader feel intrigued by the mystery, that is Gatsby. Partying, a definite theme in this book, pops up repeatedly. A refuge to the everyday loneliness that Gatsby feels, his parties are grand in scale and extravagant in taste. "Every Friday five crates of oranges and lemons arrived from a fruitier in New York-every Monday these same oranges and lemons left his back door in a pyramid of pulpless halves" (43) On the other hand, the first formal encounter between Gatsby, Daisy and Tom proves confrontational. Fitzgerald reminds the reader that serious feeling hang in the balance and the party has concluded. Gatsby has waited a long time to tell Daisy of his feelings and his anxiety permeates as an underlying tone. Anxiety yields to desperation, as Gatsby grapples with the seriousness of his feeling for Daisy, "She only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me. It was a terrible mistake, but in her heart she never loved anyone except me!" (137). It does not matter how much money Gatsby amasses because it will never erase the past between Daisy and Gatsby. Gatsby defines the victim in question as Holmes referred it. Wealth did not help Gatsby gain a foothold on the social status ladder. Wealth did not help Gatsby win back Daisy, or erase their past together. By using setting, relationships and tone, Fitzgerald wrote an incomparable novel that teaches the reader some of life's lessons. Fitzgerald breathed life in Gatsby, he absolutely embodied a 'green light,' in his hopes and his dreams. Fitzgerald made it clear that no matter how much a man acquires he always yearns for more and wants something he cannot have. Gatsby, as hopeful as the 'green light' he symbolized, never reached that vision of a future with Daisy. Instead he pretended that money would solve all his problems. Perhaps this is the most important lesson of all. The Great Gatsby brings new meaning to the saying "money doesn't buy happiness."
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5.0 von 5 Sternen This book is the tops, Old Sport!, 9. Juni 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Great Gatsby (Taschenbuch)
The Great Gatsby is the best novel I think I have ever read. We had to read it in my high school English class and I loved it even then. I've read it two more time in the three years I have been out of high school, and I plan to read it at least one a year. I feel I have to, its like revisiting old friends who you wish you could help but you know you can't. This novel is awesome in the way that the characters just pop off the page. The Great Gatsby is so sad too because in the end no one "wins" except maybe for Nick who is a better man for having known Gatsby. Eventhough Nick believes that Daisy and Tom can retreat into their money and forget anything ever happened, Daisy still has to live with the fact that she got the only man who every really loved her killed, I don't think money could make her forget that. Anyway I recommend this book to anyone who hasn't read it, although if you read it when you were in high school, I suggest reading it again, because you probably missed how beautiful this book is in the rush to have it finished before the test! Also, if any of you have not seen the movie go rent it or check for it on your local classic movie channel because I've seen the movie on one of those channels at least ten times. The casting is excellent. Mia Farrow was the perfect "Daisy" beautiful, delicate, her voice "full of money." Nick, sweetly played by the lovely Sam Waterston. And lets not forget Robert Redford's portrayal of the great Jay Gatsby. I thought he did and excellent job. This movie is very beautiful and if you don't cry as Daisy and Gatsby renew their love, or when George mourns over Mrytle's body, then you are not human!! I could write all day about the book and the movie but I will just say that they are both worth checking out. Lose yourself in the decadent twenties!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen

The Great Gatsby -- The First Techno Novel, 21. April 1998

The story is a trifle, the characters are waxworks, the ideas are second-hand -- so why is Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby the most stunning, the most precious, the most indispensable of all novels? One word -- beauty. The Great Gatsby is like a gorgeous, glittering dream that evaporates upon waking. Its slipperiness leaves you frustrated yet somehow content, aware you've just tasted of an alien world -- an unrecapturable vision all the more inspiring for its transience. What separates Gatsby from other great novels is Fitzgerald's selflessness -- unlike Joyce, Faulkner, Proust, or almost any other author you care to mention, he isn't just out to strut his stuff: he wants to GIVE you something. The grandeur of the world as seen through a child's eyes, and then lost, is all restored in 170 slim pages, through imagery painted with a fairy's wand, and sentences that seem lit up in celestial neon.
I'm being hyperbolic with my praise here because, for once, my inborn cynicism has met its Waterloo. The Great Gatsby is one of a very few treasures whose charms have not shrivelled up with age -- not just the book's age, but my own. The sad truth is, back in junior high when I first read Gatsby, I thought it was simple-minded, decidedly modest in scope and ambition, and woefully inferior to its reputation. I then went on to prostrate myself before the temples of Shakespeare, Doestoevsky, Martin Amis, Celine, and other authors who met my demand for what I thought was sophistication. But something has been stripped away. While all those old idols are now musty and faint, The Great Gatsby, simple and unpretentious, continues to grow.
What astonishes me most about the book is its futuristic imagery, so far ahead of its time that Gatsby may very well be the definitive end-of-the-millenium novel every modern author is scurrying to write. The pulsing green light across the Sound, the islands in the shape of eggs, and, especially, the looming, sinister eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg -- these are mythic, unforgettable images that Fitzgerald tattoos across the back of your eyelids. They transcend literature, transcend even film, to become like a fantasy of a film playing in a great director's head, but which the camera is just too clumsy to capture ( the 1974 film of The Great Gatsby is certainly painful proof of this, though Jack Clayton is no great director -- this book deserves nothing less than the Jean-Luc Godard who made Pierrot Le Fou ).
I still agree with my teenage self that Fitzgerald is a shallow thinker -- but I'm smart enough now to realize shallow thinkers often make the best artists. The world may always be with us, and heavily, but transfigured through Fitzgerald's eyes, that same world is slight, measureless, and, despite all our best efforts to grasp it, ever so slightly out of reach -- a low-flying cloud.
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The Great Gatsby (English Edition)
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