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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Common sense with a French accent
As author Mireille Guiliano, executive of the company Champagne Veuve Clicquot (for those who don't know, one of the better Champagnes in the world), states, it is of course true that there are some French women who do get overweight. However, there are some common sense ideas that she learned as a child, and observed in seeing the general differences between her time in...
Veröffentlicht am 24. Februar 2006 von FrKurt Messick

versus
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Nothing new, but okay!
„French Women Don't Get Fat" was an interesting read. Not because Guiliano divulges anything, we wouldn't already know, but because it was nice to see easy principles to lose weight put down in written and being reminded of what you probably already knew:
Her weight loss principle is divided into four phases:
1) "wake-up call": inventory of all meals you...
Veröffentlicht am 28. Februar 2005 von Wombatsbooks


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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Nothing new, but okay!, 28. Februar 2005
Von 
Wombatsbooks - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)   
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„French Women Don't Get Fat" was an interesting read. Not because Guiliano divulges anything, we wouldn't already know, but because it was nice to see easy principles to lose weight put down in written and being reminded of what you probably already knew:
Her weight loss principle is divided into four phases:
1) "wake-up call": inventory of all meals you have over a period of three weeks
2) "recasting": an introduction to the French School of portions and proportions,
3) "stabilization": a stage where everything you eat is reintegrated in proper measure and
4) "the rest of your life": you are at your target weight, a stable equilibrium and the rest is just refinements.
Everything is about aiming at changing your way of life, your eating habits w/o losing the "joie de vivre". Everything is based on Guiliano's personal experience and she included lots of nice recipes as well as lots of tips.
However, I think that this book is primarily targeting the American market with more than 65 % being obese and gorging on fast food, processed, pre-packed foods and TV-Dinners and where loads of people don't know (or don't grasp) the concept of "good food" versus "bad food". And let's be honest: Don't we all *know* with our heart of hearts that we shouldn't gorge on candy, high-fat food and stuff like that but better have some veggies and fruit? And don't we all know that it would be better for our waistlines if we just had *a few* crisps instead of a whole bag? Don't we all know that we should *move* instead of being couch potatoes? However it is not only a matter of the brain, proportions and self-containment for the rest of your life, but also a matter of finances: Guiliano suggests only using the finest and best ingredients to be had. Not everybody can afford the finest salmon, the best chocolate and ecologically grown fruit/veggies etc. every day.
Did "French Women Don't Get Fat" do the trick for me? No, I don't think so, although it brought back several things that have been buried deep inside my gray matter. Nice read, but not worth the investment for a HC.
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Common sense with a French accent, 24. Februar 2006
As author Mireille Guiliano, executive of the company Champagne Veuve Clicquot (for those who don't know, one of the better Champagnes in the world), states, it is of course true that there are some French women who do get overweight. However, there are some common sense ideas that she learned as a child, and observed in seeing the general differences between her time in America and her time in France.
Guiliano works through her ideas on menu, diet, nutrition, exercise and lifestyle with anecdotal and personal experience rather than scientific studies; thus, some may disagree with her conclusions. Guiliano does not put out this book in any way to insult the American lifestyle -- on the contrary, Guiliano has had a love affair with the English language (French being her first language) and American culture since her school days.
One of the first stories Guiliano recounts is her school year spent in America, during what in this country would be known as high school. A prestigious award, she was excited to learn all about American culture; what she also learned about was chocolate chip cookies and brownies, and ended up returning home after a year abroad by at least 15 pounds heavier.
Guiliano reiterates some of the common aspects of French living that Americans have already recognised -- the benefits of red wine on cholesterol, for example, but haven't adapted their general eating habits to reflect good health. Indeed, some have used the use of red wine as an invitation to eat more!
Guiliano's recommendations are in many ways common sense. It makes sense to eat a variety of different kinds of food, and always (as French people who shop in small, street-side farmer's market kinds of shops will know) always pick the fruits and vegetables that are in season. Eating a variety of foods does not mean to 'pig out' -- one should eat a lot of different things, but eat in moderation. This means that one should eat with care and deliberation; one should savour food, which, if the food is well prepared and fresh, should be a real delight. Eating more slowly (something that our 'fast food' culture has almost linguistically removed as a possibility) generally means eating less, as the body will feel more full before large amounts of food are consumed.
Guiliano has a four-phase plan: the wake up call; the recasting phase; the stabilisation phase; and finally, 'the rest of your life'. This is not a dietary 'boot camp', but rather is a gentle, general shift in patterns that allow one to increase some indulgences (in moderation, of course), along with some changes in overall ideas about food.
Guiliano includes recipes, discussions of seasonings that will enhance the culinary experience, ideas for drinking (it should be no surprise that most of us do not drink enough water, and too much by way of soft-drinks), bread and chocolate, and more. The recipes included under the chocolate heading (Chocolate Rice Pudding; Chocolate-Espresso Faux Souffles; Mousse au Chocolat; and Tartine au Cacao) are truly wonderful (I've made two, and am thus guessing on the other two), and show that chocolate is certainly not off limits!
Guiliano's style is fun and witty, and her advice accessible and achievable. It is a diet not just for women, and is a lifestyle that many could easily and happily adapt to.
Bon appetit!
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Very good book on the subject of food for people with tolerance towards French narcissism, 8. August 2013
I love the book although i must admit i am at ease with French language and culture to start with. The tips that author gives are brilliant and will workf or anyone who adoptes them. However i am convinced that the author IS out of touch with an average person, French and non-French alike. So one needs to be tolerant and selective when reading this book.
Just to let you know again, i loved the book, but i can understand those who might find the read complicated because of the use of French words/phrases, or due to constant comparison between French and Americans that in many cases is not complitely true.
Hope you find this review useful!
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Charming Memoir about Eating, Drinking and Living Well, 25. Februar 2005
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Whenever I have traveled to France, I have found myself marveling at two things:

1. I usually lose weight even though I eat great meals and drink more wine than at home;

2. I see a smaller percentage of obese people (especially women) than in any other developed country I visit.

After much observation and discussion, I've concluded in the past that the French provide smaller portions of everything, don't go in for "all you can eat" buffets, eat less processed food, make things delicious so that they are more satisfying in smaller quantities, and walk a great deal compared to Americans. More recently, I've noticed that most of the food is nouvelle so there isn't much fat, sugar or starch in it.

Voila! That's exactly the conclusion that Ms. Guiliano makes as well as she recounts her journey from becoming a fat teenager as an exchange student binging on brownies in my current hometown of Weston, Massachusetts to prospering as a slim French woman married to an American in the United States. In addition, she is CEO of Clicquot, Inc. which means that she regularly indulges in Champagne rather than the red wine that so many believe helps keep the French slimmer.

As I read the book, I realized that Ms. Guiliano captured most of the best lessons of the South Beach Diet which I used successfully last year. The main difference between the recommended eating plans is that Ms. Guiliano has you start by creating an eating diary. With this diary, you figure out where you have bad eating habits. Then you begin to gradually reduce those eating habits in ways that leave you feeling comfortable and happy. The South Beach Diet briefly slashes (for two weeks) your intake of fats and carbs so that any insulin problems you have developed can be overcome.

If you wanted to use Ms. Guiliano's advice and the South Beach diet, you could combine them by doing the eating diary, then doing stage one on South Beach and then combining both sources for recipes and eating advice as you continue to lose and then maintain your weight. I thought that Ms. Guiliano had the better advice on maintenance.

I've also watched my wife eat a broad variety of foods frequently and in small quantities, walk a lot and easily keep her weight under control. Her experience also validated Ms. Guiliano's observations for me.

But for me, the best part of this book is partaking of Ms. Guiliano's many expressions of joie de vivre relating to food. I've come to appreciate my forays into buying fresh fruit and vegetables and preparing them in new ways. She explains the many joys of that pastime very well. Her recipes are simple to make and seem intriguing. I intend to try many of them.

Her writing is a delight, dropping in lots of little French phrases to give the book a particular charm. N'est-ce pas?

The books I enjoy the most are the ones that introduce me to someone I would like to have as a friend. Ms. Guiliano ranks above almost all writers in this regard, especially among the normally oh-so-serious nonfiction authors who preach to us rather than love us as we are. Ms. Guiliano clearly loves the slim person hiding within us, along with our passions for certain foods and eating events.

Whether you are looking to lose weight or not, I recommend this book to anyone who wants to enjoy life more. Pourquoi pas?
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Must-Read, 2. Januar 2014
Von 
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: French Women Don't Get Fat: The Secret of Eating for Pleasure (Kindle Edition)
I think everyone (especially in the English-speaking world) should read this book and stop obsessing about calories, exercise, low-carb, paleo, and other weird diets. This is a precious little reference guide you can keep for life. The fact that My Guiliano has been where many of us are now (slightly overweight and addicted to pastries) makes it all the more credible. But apart from that, it has amusing stories to tell and gives great background information on European eating habits in general. A must-read.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Well written, motivating, recipes to inspire a French gourmet experience!, 26. September 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Well-written book contrasting the nicely balanced French lifestyle with an American lifestyle of extremes (fast food vs extreme sports). Great stories that detail the importance of eating for pleasure, but with measure. Tipps for an everyday well-balanced healthy life and recipes for easily prepared French gourmet glamour.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Charming Memoir about Eating, Drinking and Living Well, 25. Februar 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Whenever I have traveled to France, I have found myself marveling at two things:

1. I usually lose weight even though I eat great meals and drink more wine than at home;

2. I see a smaller percentage of obese people (especially women) than in any other developed country I visit.

After much observation and discussion, I've concluded in the past that the French provide smaller portions of everything, don't go in for "all you can eat" buffets, eat less processed food, make things delicious so that they are more satisfying in smaller quantities, and walk a great deal compared to Americans. More recently, I've noticed that most of the food is nouvelle so there isn't much fat, sugar or starch in it.

Voila! That's exactly the conclusion that Ms. Guiliano makes as well as she recounts her journey from becoming a fat teenager as an exchange student binging on brownies in my current hometown of Weston, Massachusetts to prospering as a slim French woman married to an American in the United States. In addition, she is CEO of Clicquot, Inc. which means that she regularly indulges in Champagne rather than the red wine that so many believe helps keep the French slimmer.

As I read the book, I realized that Ms. Guiliano captured most of the best lessons of the South Beach Diet which I used successfully last year. The main difference between the recommended eating plans is that Ms. Guiliano has you start by creating an eating diary. With this diary, you figure out where you have bad eating habits. Then you begin to gradually reduce those eating habits in ways that leave you feeling comfortable and happy. The South Beach Diet briefly slashes (for two weeks) your intake of fats and carbs so that any insulin problems you have developed can be overcome.

If you wanted to use Ms. Guiliano's advice and the South Beach diet, you could combine them by doing the eating diary, then doing stage one on South Beach and then combining both sources for recipes and eating advice as you continue to lose and then maintain your weight. I thought that Ms. Guiliano had the better advice on maintenance.

I've also watched my wife eat a broad variety of foods frequently and in small quantities, walk a lot and easily keep her weight under control. Her experience also validated Ms. Guiliano's observations for me.

But for me, the best part of this book is partaking of Ms. Guiliano's many expressions of joie de vivre relating to food. I've come to appreciate my forays into buying fresh fruit and vegetables and preparing them in new ways. She explains the many joys of that pastime very well. Her recipes are simple to make and seem intriguing. I intend to try many of them.

Her writing is a delight, dropping in lots of little French phrases to give the book a particular charm. N'est-ce pas?

The books I enjoy the most are the ones that introduce me to someone I would like to have as a friend. Ms. Guiliano ranks above almost all writers in this regard, especially among the normally oh-so-serious nonfiction authors who preach to us rather than love us as we are. Ms. Guiliano clearly loves the slim person hiding within us, along with our passions for certain foods and eating events.

Whether you are looking to lose weight or not, I recommend this book to anyone who wants to enjoy life more. Pourquoi pas?
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War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Common sense with a French accent, 24. Februar 2006
As author Mireille Guiliano, executive of the company Champagne Veuve Clicquot (for those who don't know, one of the better Champagnes in the world), states, it is of course true that there are some French women who do get overweight. However, there are some common sense ideas that she learned as a child, and observed in seeing the general differences between her time in America and her time in France.
Guiliano works through her ideas on menu, diet, nutrition, exercise and lifestyle with anecdotal and personal experience rather than scientific studies; thus, some may disagree with her conclusions. Guiliano does not put out this book in any way to insult the American lifestyle -- on the contrary, Guiliano has had a love affair with the English language (French being her first language) and American culture since her school days.
One of the first stories Guiliano recounts is her school year spent in America, during what in this country would be known as high school. A prestigious award, she was excited to learn all about American culture; what she also learned about was chocolate chip cookies and brownies, and ended up returning home after a year abroad by at least 15 pounds heavier.
Guiliano reiterates some of the common aspects of French living that Americans have already recognised -- the benefits of red wine on cholesterol, for example, but haven't adapted their general eating habits to reflect good health. Indeed, some have used the use of red wine as an invitation to eat more!
Guiliano's recommendations are in many ways common sense. It makes sense to eat a variety of different kinds of food, and always (as French people who shop in small, street-side farmer's market kinds of shops will know) always pick the fruits and vegetables that are in season. Eating a variety of foods does not mean to 'pig out' -- one should eat a lot of different things, but eat in moderation. This means that one should eat with care and deliberation; one should savour food, which, if the food is well prepared and fresh, should be a real delight. Eating more slowly (something that our 'fast food' culture has almost linguistically removed as a possibility) generally means eating less, as the body will feel more full before large amounts of food are consumed.
Guiliano has a four-phase plan: the wake up call; the recasting phase; the stabilisation phase; and finally, 'the rest of your life'. This is not a dietary 'boot camp', but rather is a gentle, general shift in patterns that allow one to increase some indulgences (in moderation, of course), along with some changes in overall ideas about food.
Guiliano includes recipes, discussions of seasonings that will enhance the culinary experience, ideas for drinking (it should be no surprise that most of us do not drink enough water, and too much by way of soft-drinks), bread and chocolate, and more. The recipes included under the chocolate heading (Chocolate Rice Pudding; Chocolate-Espresso Faux Souffles; Mousse au Chocolat; and Tartine au Cacao) are truly wonderful (I've made two, and am thus guessing on the other two), and show that chocolate is certainly not off limits!
Guiliano's style is fun and witty, and her advice accessible and achievable. It is a diet not just for women, and is a lifestyle that many could easily and happily adapt to.
Bon appetit!
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Ein einziges Klischee, 7. April 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Ich habe mich über die Lektüre eher geärgert. Das Buch strotzt vor Verallgemeinerungen und Selbstbeweihräucherung. Ich kann dieses Buch nicht Empfehlen.
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1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen More cook book than diet book, 16. Februar 2005
Von Ein Kunde
Look girls, if you want some new interesting French recipes for croissants etc this is fine but I wouldn't waste my money on it if you want to lose weight. Here's the gist of the diet advice: Figure out on what you overeat and reduce it, if you indulge in chocolate or such really savour it and balance it with a lighter meal and cook real fresh meals. The little snippets of French vocabulary started to get on my nerves after a while.
Nice styling of the book though.
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