Kundenrezensionen


28 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (18)
4 Sterne:
 (3)
3 Sterne:
 (3)
2 Sterne:
 (3)
1 Sterne:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


12 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "A TRENCHANT, DEFIANT, ENGROSSING NOVEL"
If you read but one book this year let it be The Goldfinch, seven years in the writing and well worth every day of waiting for the incomparable pleasure it brings. Donna Tartt’s prose sings, dances, makes you smile and breaks your heart. Each word is carefully chosen, so perfect in placement that it is as if a master craftsman had set it there. And why not...
Vor 10 Monaten von Gail Cooke veröffentlicht

versus
78 von 87 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Superficial, shallow, boring and inconsistent
This was easily the most overrated book of 2013. I hated it. Let me try to explain why:

1. The constant use of superlative language: Every slam is deafening, every headache splitting, the narrator is "tormented" by small things (not the bombing that takes place in the beginning itself). Donna Tartt writes in a language of a cliche New York snob, where...
Vor 6 Monaten von B. Lutze veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

78 von 87 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Superficial, shallow, boring and inconsistent, 10. Februar 2014
Von 
B. Lutze (Potsdam) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 1000 REZENSENT)    (REAL NAME)   
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (English Edition) (Kindle Edition)
This was easily the most overrated book of 2013. I hated it. Let me try to explain why:

1. The constant use of superlative language: Every slam is deafening, every headache splitting, the narrator is "tormented" by small things (not the bombing that takes place in the beginning itself). Donna Tartt writes in a language of a cliche New York snob, where every little thing is forced to mean something or to be special. Horrible.
2. Cultural, but superficial name dropping (all the freaking time): 13 year olds with Palestrina on their Ipods (or Shostakovich), art history books that a kid carries with him, Tupac Shakur courses at high school, and on and on and on. Neither the narrator, nor the main characters are really affected by art. It does not serve any purpose here, other than Tartt showing off, in a patronizing and preaching manner: Disgusting.
3. Oh, boy, her problem with time: Ipods in 1999? Or references to 9/11? The research here is lousy, brands and products appear at times when there were not even launched or invented. Bad job, Donna, what did you do in those 10 years?
4. Length: 770 pages? Really? With endless sections about furniture restoration and drug use? With completely shallow and inconsistent characters, that are sketchy at best?

I am really sorry that I am using the superlative language I complained about myself, but this book was the worst I forced myself to read in a long time. What a waste of time.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


23 von 26 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Too Many Words!, 16. März 2014
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (Gebundene Ausgabe)
It took me a month to read this novel. It was a major investment on my part. I am a slow reader, but even the fastest of readers will have to make a definite commitment to get through it.

I’m not sorry that I read “The Goldfinch.” I just wish I could have liked it more. When I was finished, the first thought that went through my mind was that the book’s page count could have been reduced by half and it would have had not only the same, but likely a greater impact on the reader. Another first gut reaction: too much drug description. Too much alcohol. Again: less could have been more. It got absolutely tiresome reading all this. Didn’t Tartt have an editor? I understand, of course, that everything is beautifully written, but enough is enough.

I was fascinated by the worlds Tartt opened up for us: the life of wealthy New Yorkers via Mrs. Barber & Co; the antique furniture world via Hobie, the restaurator; seedy Las Vegas as seen through the eyes of teenagers who have to live there. I appreciated her craft in building these worlds.

And I thought she did a great job developing her characters. They were life-like. Each had his or her own cadence, quirks, etc . Their inner life shone through. They were complex human beings.

Nonetheless: there was only one character, one character amongst dozens, who we really like: Hobie. And he’s not the protagonist. He’s the mentor character — I suppose metaphorically speaking, the one who not only fixes up the furniture, but other characters, ie. Pippa and Theo, too. But he’s not the protagonist who takes us through hundreds upon hundreds of pages. Theo is the protagonist and he’s not really likeable. I can appreciate that Theo’s “goodness” dies the moment his mother dies, but I really do wish he had some redeeming factor. I couldn’t find it amidst all those gorgeous, voluptuous words, images and metaphors of Tartt’s. Okay, the mother, who is killed at the beginning in the explosion of the Met, seems nice enough, but we do wonder how she could have been crazy enough to stay so long with her sad sack, gambling, conniving, self-centered husband.

Boris, Theo’s best friend, is a wonderfully colorful character, but, alas, he’s a one-joke character too. At first it’s great fun “listening” to him talk a mile a minute with his mix of English, Russian, Ukrainian and maybe ten other languages. But after a while, I as a reader, thought: I get it. I got it a hundred pages ago. It’s boring listening to this over and over and over again.

So this is what I think: Tartt is absolutely brilliant at dazzling us. The book is an explosion of words, characters and exotic worlds. We are amazed. We are fascinated. But at the end of the day, when the shock of the explosion settles, we wonder: so? Big deal! And why? Because we don’t really care about these characters. I know, I know, they may be very realistic, and maybe that’s how life it, but if she had given us a reason to love Theo and Boris despite their blown-out minds and callousness, their criminal ways and mixed up hearts, it would have gone a long way to make this a more satisfying read. As I see it, the book totters between 3 and 4 stars. Today, after writing this, it feels like 3. So be it.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Das erste Buch, das ich nicht zu Ende lesen werde, 9. August 2014
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (English Edition) (Kindle Edition)
Ich habe das Buch von einer Freudin geschenkt bekommen. Daher habe ich erst auf Seite 300 mal die Rezensionen dazu hier auf amazon aufgerufen. Und ich bin so beruhigt: es wird meist das geschrieben, was ich auch beim Lesen bis dahin empfunden habe: zeitweise brillante Sprache (ich lese auf englisch), sehr gute Charaktere, sehr dicht und detailreich.
Aber eben zu detailreich. Wie bei Dickens: man ist so gefangen von der Beschreibung der agierenden Menschen und Situationen, die aber eigentlich nicht sympatisch und "mitfibernswert" sind. Ich bin gerade mitten in den Exzessen von Boris und Theo in Las Vegas.
Wenn ich das Buch weglege, lebt das Gelesene noch weiter - im Prinzip sehr gut! Da es aber fast durchweg negative Entwicklungen sind, habe ich nun beschlossen, das Buch nicht zu beenden. Das ist das erste Buch (und ich lese sehr, sehr viel), das ich nicht zu Ende lesen werde. Eine Rezension schrieb von den Dickens-Ähnlichkeiten. Ja, es ist wirklich so. Wer Dickens gerne liest - ja, für den ist dieses Buch sicherlich genau richtig.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Tja..., 7. Mai 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (English Edition) (Kindle Edition)
Wunderbar geschrieben. Und dennoch: langatmig und streckenweise langweilig. Die Sauf- und Kotzorgien zweier Halbwüchsiger sind nicht unterhaltsam. Weniger wäre mehr gewesen.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Ein etwas zu dick geratener Vogel, 1. August 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (Taschenbuch)
Buch ist wohl ein Bestseller und auch gut geschrieben, aber v i e l zu weitschweifig (darum auch mächtig voluminös) . Geschichte wäre auch gestrafft ein
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Wie man Spannung totquatscht, 22. Juli 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Goldfinch (Audio CD)
...dafür ist dieses Buch ein Lehrstück! Schon die erste potenziell spannende Szene sei hier beispielhaft genannt - Theo und seine Mutter befinden sich in einem Museum, in dem eine Bombe hochgeht. Der Junge kommt in den Trümmern wieder zu sich, findet einen alten sterbenden Mann, der ihn (gefühlt) ewig lang bequasselt. Theo hört (gefühlt) ewig lang zu, blablabla, Theo trinkt Wasser, Theo nimmt das Bild, Theo nimmt den Ring, quassel quassel, (gefühlte) Ewigkeiten verstreichen, und irgendwann mal - siehe da! - fällt Theo ein, dass er noch eine Mutter hat, die seit der Detonation verschwunden ist, und an die er bisher nicht einen Gedanken verschwendet hat, obwohl sie doch das Zentrum seiner Existenz ist. Sicher, man kann alles auf den Schock eines Kindes schieben. Aber überzeugt hat's mich zu keiner Sekunde. Der sterbende alte Mann ist Fundament der gesamten Handlung, die Autorin musste diese Szene so hinbiegen, wie sie es getan hat, aber ich fühlte mich von der Szene erst befremdet, dann gelangweilt.

Und so geht es in einem Fort weiter. Dabei sind Theos Empfindungen und Gedanken als verwaistes Kind tiefgründig, empfindsam und ergreifend, seine Drogenkarriere, sein zwielichtiges Leben - alles nachvollziehbar. Nur leider wäre weniger mehr gewesen - so sensibel die Bilder ausgewählt sind, mit denen die Autorin Theo sein Leid schildern lässt, so sind es oft zuviele. Die Inflationierung nimmt weiter zu, als Boris in Theos Leben tritt. Dabei ist Boris eine wunderbare Figur - ein total unkonventionelles Kid, das bereit zu jeder Untat ist, solange sie Fun verspricht. Aber die Szenen mit Boris sind quälend lang, jeder Gedankenfurz wird beblubbert nach bester russisch-philosophischer Manier.

Wann immer Boris auftauchte, wünschte ich mir, ich müsste nicht das Hörbuch in voller Länge hören, sondern könnte die Seiten querlesen.

Gut gefallen hat mir hingegen Theos Vater. Hier wird die Figur nicht breitgetreten, sondern hier schillert der zwielichtige Charakter des Vaters unkommentiert; mir wurde ausnahmsweise nicht vorgekaut, wie ich den Vater zu sehen habe, sondern hier durfte ich mir selbst eine Meinung bilden. Auch bei Theos Verlobter hat's mir sehr gut gefallen, dass ihre Figur Heimlichkeiten anzeichnete, ohne dass sie sofort ausgeleuchtet wurden. Da dachte ich mir: Was hätte das für ein Roman werden können, wenn nicht alles totgequasselt worden wäre!

Wie das Bild, so das Buch: Wird das Bild "Der Distelfink" im Buch als unglaubliches Meisterwerk beschrieben, so scheint das in der Kunstgeschichte nicht ganz so gesehen zu werden; Bild und Buch sind zwischenzeitlich aber eine lukrative Symbiose eingegangen, so dass nun das Bild im Mauritshus an prominentere Stelle rückt und die literarische Welt Donna Tartts Roman zugleich zum Meisterwerk erklärt. Cleveres Marketing ist alles!!

Fazit: Meilenweit entfernt von einem Meisterwerk. Wegen Theos herrlich schillerndem Vater gnadenhalber noch 2 Sterne.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


12 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "A TRENCHANT, DEFIANT, ENGROSSING NOVEL", 24. Oktober 2013
If you read but one book this year let it be The Goldfinch, seven years in the writing and well worth every day of waiting for the incomparable pleasure it brings. Donna Tartt’s prose sings, dances, makes you smile and breaks your heart. Each word is carefully chosen, so perfect in placement that it is as if a master craftsman had set it there. And why not? Tartt is a master craftsman creating fully drawn characters and revealed to us in all of their complexities. We not only see them but share their ruminations as they reveal their thoughts on life, love and the power of art.

At heart this is the story of New Yorker Theodore Decker and The Goldfinch, a painting by Dutch master Carel Fabritius. We meet Theodore or Theo at the age of 13 when he and his beloved mother take shelter from a rainstorm in a museum. His mother means everything to Theo and when she is killed in a horrific explosion at the museum he realizes “...the daily, commonplace happiness that was lost when I lost her.” For him that is so true. Somehow he manages to escape the carnage physically sound but psychologically damaged. He takes with him the Fabritius painting, an object that becomes as necessary to him as breath. But how can he keep it when eventually the world will be looking for the masterpieces lost in tragedy?

Initially Theo returns to the apartment that he shared with his mother sure that she will return. But once convinced that she is dead he ricochets from place to place, steps ahead of the social service workers. His father deserted the family years ago, and he is alone. Theo finds a temporary home with a wealthy family on the Upper East Side, the Barbours, whose son Andy had been a playmate of Theo’s years before. Then, quite suddenly, his father appears with Xandra, a woman as different from his mother as any woman could be, and announces that they are taking Theo to Las Vegas.

So begins an odyssey for the boy with thoughts of his lost mother ever near. Readers are propelled by the narrative that carries us from Park Avenue to casinos to drug dealers’ dives to auction houses to Lower East Side bars. Later he finds work in the antiques business where he quickly develops a talent for shady dealing. Throughout The Goldfinch we are introduced to unforgettable characters - Hobie, a skilled craftsman with a “rough but educated voice” who befriended Theo and gave him shelter, Boris, a Ukrainian lad who introduced him to every kind of hallucinatory extant and says, “None of us ever find enough kindness in the world, do we?”

Donna Tartt has given us a rare gift that has been called a “...trenchant, defiant, engrossing and rocketing novel..” It is that and so much more.

- Gail Cooke
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Wer Dickens mag..., 2. August 2014
Von 
Villette - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (Taschenbuch)
Mir hat der "Goldfinch" sehr gut gefallen, weil er mich an die Geschichten von Charles Dickens erinnert hat, nur eben in moderner Form. Letztlich wird die Geschichte von Theo erzählt vom Augenblick an, wo er seine Mutter bei einem Anschlag auf ein New Yorker Museum verliert, bis er Mitte 20 ist und die Jahre dazwischen damit verbracht hat, mehr oder weniger sich selbst zu zerstören. Dabei helfen ihm vor allem Drogen, aber auch sein Umfeld. Das hört sich bis hierhin nicht nach einer besonders anziehenden Geschichte an, aber "The Goldfinch" hat eine besondere Atmosphäre, die ich sehr genossen habe. Das ist vor allem das New York der Upper Class und der Antiquitätenladen von Hobie, bei dem Theo letztlich unterkommt. Dieser Laden ist auch wieder wie aus einem Dickens-Roman entsprungen. So wie das Mädchen Pippa, das Theo anbetet, seit er es kurz vor dem Anschlag im Museum gesehen hat. Überhaupt sind alle Figuren ziemlich gut geraten und von ihnen gibt es eine Menge auf diesen vielen Seiten. Ich verstehe, dass manche das Buch gern gekürzt hätten, und vielleicht hätten ihm 100 Seiten weniger tatsächlich gut getan, ich meine nur, dass es nicht darum geht, Handlung darzustellen und daher schnell vorwärtszueilen. Zwar nimmt das Buch am Ende etwas an Fahrt auf, aber letztlich war das nicht Ziel der Geschichte. Es geht einfach um Theos Leben und seinen Kampf mit der eigenen Schuld und den Zufällen des Lebens. Und so ein Leben braucht eben Zeit. Sprachlich mochte ich das Buch ebenfalls. Es ist sehr dicht geschrieben. Ein bisschen Krimi ist auch dabei, etwas Humor, viel Kunst. Ich empfehle das Buch daher gern.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Zu lang, aber...., 21. August 2014
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (Taschenbuch)
Wie viele andere finde auch ich das Buch zu lang. Jedoch ist ihre (Donna Tartts) Sprache brillant (engl. Version) und das verdient 5 Sterne. Auch habe ich hier und da geweint -> kommt selten vor, heißt also, dass D. Tartt große Gefühle freisetzen kann: 5 Sterne.
Nach Theos Rückkehr von Vegas nach NY musste ich mich leider sehr quälen und mir fiel das flotte, gefesselte Lesen nicht mehr so leicht wie in der ersten Hälfte. Für diese Längen und auch ein paar andere, zu langatmig geschilderte Passagen ziehe ich einen Stern ab und komme auf 4.
PS: man sollte schon Urlaub haben, wenn man diesen Schinken von Buch lesen möchte, sonst wird es gnadenlos...
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


13 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen My absolute literary highlight in 2013, 4. Dezember 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Goldfinch (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Certainly this year has seen a lot of memorable publications but Donna Tartt's new book is my absolute highlight. A novel of Tolstoyan dimensions it describes the life of Theodore Decker, a teenager who survives a bombing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and retrieves a priceless painting from the destroyed gallery he happens to be in at the moment of the attack. Injured and traumatized he succeeds to smuggle the painting out of the building, returns home and starts to wait for his mother, who was with him at the museum. It turns out that his mother is among the casualties, which means that his life is about to change totally. Orphaned he is taken up into the family of a school friend till his estranged father shows up and takes him from New York to Las Vegas. Over time the painting becomes Theodore's - as the New York Times wrote - prize, guilt and burden. We will follow Decker, who at the time of the accident is only 13 years old through early adulthood into his twenties, when he is working in the antique business. The novel starts in Amsterdam and Theo retells his life with a remark early on, that everything would have turned out different, if his mother had lived.
I had seen the Dutch translation of Goldfinch in Amsterdam at the beginning of October and was surprised by its sheer volume of well over a 1000 pages. Naturally, also the English version is long but the nearly 800 pages stand for a perfect reading experience. In the end you will have spent quite a few hours with Theo Decker and the characters surrounding him. You will know his life inside out. So much that you could be tempted to believe, he really exists and can be contacted in New York. (The painting actually is real and somehow currently on exhibition in New York).
Anyway a very good story and worth waiting for all the years that Donna Tartt needed to compose this literary cosmos of Theo Decker's world.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

The Goldfinch (English Edition)
EUR 5,99
Auf meinen Wunschzettel Zahlungsmöglichkeiten ansehen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen