Kundenrezensionen


74 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (65)
4 Sterne:
 (5)
3 Sterne:
 (4)
2 Sterne:    (0)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


32 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Powerful Story of Atonement and Redemption
The reviews of The Kite Runner when it came out made me think I wouldn't like the book so I deliberately passed on it until now. I recently had the opportunity to read Khaled Hosseini's stunning second novel, A Thousand Splendid Suns, and realized that I had made a mistake by skipping The Kite Runner.

Amir grows up in a male-dominated kind of Eden in his...
Veröffentlicht am 17. April 2007 von Donald Mitchell

versus
16 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen I thought this book was average at best.
I thought this book was average at best. For about the first half of this book I was totally enthralled. It felt more like a biography or a memoir than a work of fiction. The author's writing style is rather staightforward which adds to the gritty realistic feel of the storyline. I suspect much of the first half of the book is based on true life recollections of the...
Am 24. Februar 2006 veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 28 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

32 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Powerful Story of Atonement and Redemption, 17. April 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
The reviews of The Kite Runner when it came out made me think I wouldn't like the book so I deliberately passed on it until now. I recently had the opportunity to read Khaled Hosseini's stunning second novel, A Thousand Splendid Suns, and realized that I had made a mistake by skipping The Kite Runner.

Amir grows up in a male-dominated kind of Eden in his wealthy father's beautiful home in Kabul. His doting father loves to give him presents. There are two servants Ali and his son, Hassan, who make life pleasant. Amir and Hassan also enjoy a close friendship whose foundation is Hassan's tremendous loyalty. But there are cracks in Eden. Amir knows that his father doesn't really approve of him: Amir is a coward while his Baba is as brave as a lion. Amir's mother died in childbirth so there's little nurturing except from Baba's friend and business partner, Rahim Khan. Ali's wife and Hassan's mother, Sanaubar, ran off with a clan of traveling singers and dancers a week after Hassan was born. Both boys shared a wet nurse which helped make them feel closer. Ali and Hassan are Shi'a Muslims and ethnic Hazaras, two qualities that make them be viewed as worthy of only being servants by the powerful Pashtuns. To further emphasize their differences, Ali is crippled and Hassan has a hare lip. Amir loves books, but uses his learning to humble Hassan.

But Amir thinks things are going well when his father hints that he thinks Amir can win the annual kite fighting festival, something his father did as a boy. Perhaps if Amir can win, his father will approve of him. With the talented help of Hassan, the greatest kite runner (helpful in getting kites into the sky and running down those that have but cut off from their string), Amir has high hopes. The day goes well until the very end when Hassan finds himself in trouble: Amir turns his back on his friend out of cowardice. Branded by that shameful memory, the close bond between the boys is broken.

The book then takes Amir and his father to the United States to escape the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Amir adjusts to the new country better than Baba who wants to keep to the old ways.

Many years later, the tranquility of Amir's life is unexpectedly shaken when a dying Rahim Khan calls on Amir to visit him in Pakistan. What Rahim Khan has to say will forever change Amir's life. In that message comes an opportunity to atone and gain redemption.

This story is very powerful. You'll find yourself filled with strong emotions as you imagine what it is like to be Amir, Hassan, Baba, and Ali. While the story is based on modern Afghanistan, the lessons are much more universal than that.

The plot is beautifully woven in ways that will surprise and delight you. It's hard to imagine how a first-time novelist could have been so deft. But having read A Thousand Splendid Suns, it's clear that Mr. Hosseini has staggering amounts of talent.

So if reviews have discouraged you from reading this book, forget the reviews. Read The Kite Runner anyway. You'll be glad you did.

Highly recommended.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


23 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Afghanistan ist so viel mehr als Taliban und Burka..., 16. Februar 2006
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
Kabul 1975. Amir und Hassan sind die besten Freunde, doch gesellschaftlich gehören sie verschiedenen Schichten an. Amir ist der Sohn eines reichen Geschäftsmanns, Hassans Vater, ein Angehöriger der Minderheit der Hazara, ist dessen Diener.
Die Jungen stört das eigentlich nicht, sie bereiten sich eifrig auf den Drachenläuferwettbewerb vor, den sie gewinnen wollen. Doch manchmal kann es Amir nicht lassen, Hassan zu bevormunden und mit seinem Wissensvorsprung zu prahlen.
Nach dem Drachenlaufen, das Amir gewinnt, woraufhin er im ganzen Viertel gefeiert wird, kommt es zum Bruch zwischen den Jungen. Amir stößt seinen treuen Freund vor den Kopf, die Wege der beiden trennen sich.
Kurz darauf erschüttert der Sturz des Königs Afghanistan, von da an ist nichts mehr wie vorher, und Amir und sein Vater fliehen vor den katastrophalen Zuständen in die USA.
Dort leben sie in einer Gemeinschaft von Exilafghanen. Amir studiert, heiratet, führt eigentlich ein ganz normales Leben, bis ihn im Sommer 2001 ein Anruf aus Afghanistan aus der Routine reißt. Ein alter Freund seines Vaters ist todkrank und möchte Amir noch einmal sehen - eine Reise, die Amirs Leben noch einmal tiefgreifend verändert.
Abgesehen von den Taliban, Hamid Karsai und den US-Angriffen wusste ich vor diesem Buch praktisch nichts über Afghanistan, deshalb war es hochinteressant, über die Kultur und Gebräuche dieses Landes zu lesen, wie es früher einmal war.
Das Buch ist ein Roman über Familie und Freundschaft, Schuld und Sühne, über Verrat und Liebe, in einer sehr schönen Sprache erzählt. Innerhalb der Geschichte gibt es viele Parallelen zu entdecken, aber nie mit dem Holzhammer und nie als übertriebenes Stilmittel. Mir gefiel auch, dass das Ende kein schmalztriefendes Happy-End ist, aber trotzdem hoffnungsvoll.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A DISTURBING PAGETURNER SURROUNDING THE AFGHANISTAN PEOPLE,, 13. Juli 2007
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
"Then I glanced up and saw a pair of kites, red with long blue tails soaring into the sky. They danced high above the trees on the west end of the park, over the windmills, floating side by side like a pair of eyes looking down on San Francisco, the city I now called home. And suddenly Hassan's voice whispered in my head: For you a thousand times over. Hassan the harelipped kite runner."

Khaled Hosseini has made a name for himself with his popular first novel. His book cannot be put down for a long time because it is apt to rest in your thoughts until you get back to the fate and fortunes of these indelible characters.
We are introduced to Amir, and his playmate Hassan who are deep friends and spend their recreation time flying kites, playing games in the street, and getting up to the normal mischievous things boys get up to. Baba, Amir's father and Ali, Hassan's dad raises the boys themselves as they have both lost their mothers. Ali and Hassan work as servants for Baba's household but yet they are privileged to be treated just like family.

Mr. Hosseini shows us in this page-turner just how Afghanistan changes in a hurry from a place of some stability and wealth at least for Baba's household to a place of war as the Russians make they way into the country. We are made to see how the deepest of friendships can be betrayed all because of guilty consciences and convictions. The wealthy flee leaving everything included their lovely homes with their rich furniture and interiors, whilst the poor families have no choice but to remain in Afghanistan to be subjected to the wills and fancies of the Taliban.

After the war this country is unrecognizable. We see Amir leaving San Francisco where he has spent his adult years journeying back to his birthplace that holds all the memories he has carried with his all these years. These memories though disturbing have pulled him back but why? The answers are all the way through this well written first novel. May Mr. Hosseini continue to entertain us with his literary work. Bravo!!!
(SUGAR-CANE 13/07/07)
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen This novel is a tear jerking, 24. Dezember 2007
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
Hassan is Amir's dearest friend and is the son of Amir's father's servant who belongs the minority Hazara community in Afganistan. Amir and Hassan's close friendship is put under strain by an unthinkable event which happens on the day of the annual kite flying tornament. Amir's and Hassan's childhood friendship is destroyed as a result of fear and jealousy.

The story is of Amir, a novelist who lives in California whos life story is narratied by himself where he talks of his loss, redemption and guilt filled relationship with his country of birth. Amir returns to war torn Afganistan to rescue Hassan's orphaned son but is met with personal and political obstacles which leaves the reader in suspences and wanting more.

This novel is a tear jerking, heart warming insite into the relationship between freinds, family, country and culture. Hosseini really knows how to keep the reader guessing and wanting more, as a first novel it is dripping in emotion and bitter sweet memories of the character alongside giving cultural insite into the lifestyle of Afganistan. I'd also recommend reading Tino Georgiou's bestselling novel--The Fates--if you haven't read it yet!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Powerful Story of Atonement and Redemption, 17. April 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
The reviews of The Kite Runner when it came out made me think I wouldn't like the book so I deliberately passed on it until now. I recently had the opportunity to read Khaled Hosseini's stunning second novel, A Thousand Splendid Suns, and realized that I had made a mistake by skipping The Kite Runner.

Amir grows up in a male-dominated kind of Eden in his wealthy father's beautiful home in Kabul. His doting father loves to give him presents. There are two servants Ali and his son, Hassan, who make life pleasant. Amir and Hassan also enjoy a close friendship whose foundation is Hassan's tremendous loyalty. But there are cracks in Eden. Amir knows that his father doesn't really approve of him: Amir is a coward while his Baba is as brave as a lion. Amir's mother died in childbirth so there's little nurturing except from Baba's friend and business partner, Rahim Khan. Ali's wife and Hassan's mother, Sanaubar, ran off with a clan of traveling singers and dancers a week after Hassan was born. Both boys shared a wet nurse which helped make them feel closer. Ali and Hassan are Shi'a Muslims and ethnic Hazaras, two qualities that make them be viewed as worthy of only being servants by the powerful Pashtuns. To further emphasize their differences, Ali is crippled and Hassan has a hare lip. Amir loves books, but uses his learning to humble Hassan.

But Amir thinks things are going well when his father hints that he thinks Amir can win the annual kite fighting festival, something his father did as a boy. Perhaps if Amir can win, his father will approve of him. With the talented help of Hassan, the greatest kite runner (helpful in getting kites into the sky and running down those that have but cut off from their string), Amir has high hopes. The day goes well until the very end when Hassan finds himself in trouble: Amir turns his back on his friend out of cowardice. Branded by that shameful memory, the close bond between the boys is broken.

The book then takes Amir and his father to the United States to escape the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Amir adjusts to the new country better than Baba who wants to keep to the old ways.

Many years later, the tranquility of Amir's life is unexpectedly shaken when a dying Rahim Khan calls on Amir to visit him in Pakistan. What Rahim Khan has to say will forever change Amir's life. In that message comes an opportunity to atone and gain redemption.

This story is very powerful. You'll find yourself filled with strong emotions as you imagine what it is like to be Amir, Hassan, Baba, and Ali. While the story is based on modern Afghanistan, the lessons are much more universal than that.

The plot is beautifully woven in ways that will surprise and delight you. It's hard to imagine how a first-time novelist could have been so deft. But having read A Thousand Splendid Suns, it's clear that Mr. Hosseini has staggering amounts of talent.

So if reviews have discouraged you from reading this book, forget the reviews. Read The Kite Runner anyway. You'll be glad you did.

Highly recommended.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Captivating, 17. Dezember 2005
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
I have been reading novels for decades, but in all those years of reading, this is possibly the best story I have read that has a non-western setting. An Afghan friend recommended this book to me, and of course I was skeptical at first. I never expected it to be such a powerful, deep moving, well-written and touching story that happened to be set in Afghanistan.
Set in Afghanistan, in Kabul in the 1970's, the Kite Runner moves to the U.S.A and back. It includes fascinating characters like Amir who lived a privileged life as the son of an affluent man, and Hassan the son of a poor servant who perks for Amir's privileged life. The two become good friends, a friendship which is tested when Hassan is raped, a scene witnessed by Amir who made no effort to come to his friend's rescue. Yet Amir is haunted by that moment of cowardice even as he leaves for the USA.
Even though it is a fiction, this haunting story with spectacular, yet uncomfortable scenes creates in the reader a sense of reality that is difficult not to believe. I easily felt like I was reading the real life story of a young boy, who grows up still haunted by his past cowardice. The characters are real and alive, the setting in Afghanistan and America is superb, the plot is outstanding and the pace of the novel is fast and captivating.. All in all, this emotionally gripping story provides an insight and understanding of the human tragedy in Afghanistan. The author successfully touched on human emotions, stirring guilt, sadness, anger, and happiness throughout the book.Also recommended: UNION MOUJIK, CRY THE BELOVED COUNTRY,DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ich gratuliere Khaled Hosseini zu diesem Erstlingsroman !, 31. August 2006
Von 
Mirka (Rotterdam, Niederlande) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
Amir und Hassan, aufgewachsen wie Brüder in Afghanistan. Amir und Hassan, Treue bis in den Tod. Oder doch nicht? Ich gratuliere, lieber Khaled, zu diesem phantastischen Buch. Ein Buch welches dem Leser die Kultur Afghanistans, deren Werte und Norme, näherbringt. Ein Buch - endlich ! - das sich mit dem Thema Männerfreundschaft auseinandersetzt. Ein Buch, in dem Verrat und Untreue unauffallend an den Pranger gestellt werden. Ein Buch welches zeigt, dass der Verräter auch der Leidende sein kann. Genauso, wie der Verratene der Vergebende sein kann. Ein Buch, welches mitfühlen, aber nicht verurteilen lässt. Und ein Buch, welches wieder mal kein Happy-End hat, oder doch?

Mich hat dieses Buch so fasziniert, dass ich es, um keinesfalls das kleinste Detail zu verpassen, gleich zweimal hintereinander gelesen habe. In meiner Begeisterung habe ich es dann sogleich verschiedenen männlichen und weiblichen Freunden geschenkt. Bisher war keiner unter ihnen, der mir als Feedback gegeben hat, dass ihm / ihr das Buch nicht gefallen hat. Im Gegenteil, manche von ihnen hatten das Buch schon gelesen. Die Frage ist: gibt man ihm 4 oder 5 Sterne. Für Khaled Hosseini und seinen phantastischen Drachenläufer ein Luxusproblem und von mir mindestens 5 Sterne !
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ich liebe dieses Buch, 17. Januar 2008
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
Eine tragische Geschichte einer Kinder Freundschaft zwischen Amir und Hassan in Afghanistan und deren Folgen. Ein einziger Tag und ein schicksalsträchtiges Erlebnis verändern alles und verfolgen Amir noch Jahre später. Er lernt mit seiner schrecklichen Schuld zu leben, aber vergessen kann er nie. Als erwachsener Mann bekommt er dann die Chance sich von seiner Schuld zu befreien.
Ein einzigartiger Blick in das alltägliche Leben des damaligen friedlichen AfghanistanŽs und des brutalen, kriegerischen und grausamen Lebens dort heute. Ich fand es sehr faszinierend über dieses Land mehr zu erfahren, von dem man eigentlich nur Kriegsnachrichten im Fernsehen hört. Die Geschichte Amirs hat mich sehr berührt und den Wunsch in mir geweckt, mich mehr mit anderen Sitten und Ländern zu beschäftigen!!! Auch vermissen Sie nicht Tino Georgiou's topseller--The Fates--Ich empfehle es allen zu lesen!!!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Einblick in eine fremde Welt; universelle Thematik, 20. Juni 2005
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
"The Kite Runner" (Deutsch: Der Drachenläufer) ist eines der besten Bücher, das ich in den letzten Jahren gelesen habe. Es überzeugt nicht nur durch den klaren, sachlichen und gleichzeitig fesselnden Schreibstils des Autors, sondern auch durch die Geschichte, die den Leser in die ferne Welt Afghanistans vor und nach der Besetzung durch Russland versetzt. Die Geschichte ist jedoch auch universell und schildert, was dazu führt, dass die Hauptperson, Amir, nach vielen Jahren nach Afghanistan zurückkehrt, um eine alte, dort begangene Sünde, die noch immer an ihm nagt, wieder gutzumachen.
Das vom Autor selbst gelesene Hörbuch in englischer Sprache ist im Übrigen ein ganz besonderer Genuss!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Lesenswerte Geschichte aus uns fremder Kultur, 28. September 2008
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Kite Runner (Taschenbuch)
Über den Inhalt der Geschichte und auch über den Autor und seine Schreibweise wurde ja bereits ausführlich berichtet. Ich kann mich da den meisten Rezensionen nur anschließen und muss sagen, es gab schon lange kein Buch mehr, dass ich so schnell durchgelesen habe. Die Sprache des Autors und seine Erzählkunst sind einfach einzigartig, dazu flüssig und trotzdem zeitweise poetisch.
Dieser Roman bringt uns das Leben und die Kultur Afghanistans näher, gleichzeitig erhalten wir Einblick in das Leben von Menschen, deren Schicksal bis in die fernen USA miteinander verknüpft sind.
Trauer, Freude, Entsetzen, Liebe, Glück und Leid vereint in einem großartigen Buch.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 28 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

The Kite Runner
The Kite Runner von Khaled Hosseini
EUR 5,70
Auf meinen Wunschzettel Zahlungsmöglichkeiten ansehen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen