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16 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Anspruchsvolle Unterhaltung
Jedem Fan von Charles Dickens, der einigermaßen des Englischen mächtig ist, sei dringend zum Kauf dieses Hörbuchs geraten. Die Geschichte wird durch Hugh Lauries hervorragende Leistung zu einem wunderbaren Hörerlebnis, das es einem erlaubt, richtiggehend in die Welt der Hauptfigur Pip einzutauchen. Laurie liest die verschiedenen Charaktere mit...
Veröffentlicht am 3. Mai 2007 von Lady Aline

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Toll gelesen von Hugh Laurie, ABER es wurde viel zu viel gekürzt!
Toll gelesen von Hugh Laurie, die einzelnen Figuren erwachen wirklich zum Leben. ABER: die Kürzungen werfen die Erzählung sehr aus der Bahn! Schon klar, es ist die gekürzte Fassung, aber es wurde einfach zu viel und dann auch noch so plump gekürzt, dass man immer wieder stutzt. Die Geschichte wirkt so sehr fragmenthaft. SCHADE!

Nur zu...
Veröffentlicht am 9. Februar 2007 von FrolleinGoletz


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16 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Anspruchsvolle Unterhaltung, 3. Mai 2007
Jedem Fan von Charles Dickens, der einigermaßen des Englischen mächtig ist, sei dringend zum Kauf dieses Hörbuchs geraten. Die Geschichte wird durch Hugh Lauries hervorragende Leistung zu einem wunderbaren Hörerlebnis, das es einem erlaubt, richtiggehend in die Welt der Hauptfigur Pip einzutauchen. Laurie liest die verschiedenen Charaktere mit unterschiedlichen Akzenten und Stimmlagen, was tatsächlich oft vergessen läßt, daß hier nicht ein ganzes Ensemble, sondern nur ein Schauspieler am Werk ist. Das Hörbuch bietet drei Stunden exzellente Unterhaltung und ist auf jeden Fall einen Kauf wert, zumal für einen Fan des grandiosen Hugh Laurie.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Sources of Goodness, 7. Juli 2004
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Great Expectations succeeds beyond almost all novels of its time in exploring the roots of character and moral behavior. Charles Dickens makes the case for there being the potential for good in everyone. Evil and sin follow from a combination of being self-absorbed and selfish. What is remarkable about the way these themes are handled is that they are clearly based on an assessment of human psychology, long before that field was established.

The book is also remarkable for its many indelibly memorable and complex characters. Miss Havisham, Pip, Magwitch, Mr. Jaggers, and Estella are characters you will think about again and again in years to come.

The book also surrounds you with a powerful sense of place. Although the England described here is long gone, it becomes as immediate as a nightmare or a dream that you have just awakened from.

For a book about moral questions, Great Expectations also abounds in action. The scenes involving Pip and Magwitch are especially notable for way action expresses character and thought.

Great Expectations also reeks of irony, something that is seldom noticed in more modern novels. Overstatements are created to draw the irony out into the open, where it is unmistakable. Yet the overstatements attract, rather than repel. The overstatements are like the theatrical make up which makes actors and actresses look strange in the dressing room, but more real on the stage when seen from the audience.

At the same time, the plot is deliciously complex in establishing and solving mysteries before that genre had been born. As you read Great Expectations, raise your expectations to assume that you will receive answers to any dangling details. By reading the book this way, you will appreciate the craft that Mr. Dickens employed much more.

This is the third time that I have read Great Expectations over the last 40 years. I found the third reading to be by far the most rewarding. If you like the book, I encourage you to read it again in the future as well. You will find that the passage of time will change your perspective so that more nooks and crannies of the story will reveal themselves to you.

If this is to be your first reading of the book, do be patient with the book's middle third. It may seem to you that the book is drifting off into a sleep-inducing torpor. Yet, important foundations are being lain for your eventual delight.

Mr. Dickens wrote two endings for Great Expectations. Be sure to read both of them. Which one do you prefer? I find myself changing my mind.

Give love with an open heart, without expectations!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Sources of Goodness, 16. Mai 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Great Expectations succeeds beyond almost all novels of its time in exploring the roots of character and moral behavior. Charles Dickens makes the case for there being the potential for good in everyone. Evil and sin follow from a combination of being self-absorbed and selfish. What is remarkable about the way these themes are handled is that they are clearly based on an assessment of human psychology, long before that field was established.

The book is also remarkable for its many indelibly memorable and complex characters. Miss Havisham, Pip, Magwitch, Mr. Jaggers, and Estella are characters you will think about again and again in years to come.

The book also surrounds you with a powerful sense of place. Although the England described here is long gone, it becomes as immediate as a nightmare or a dream that you have just awakened from.

For a book about moral questions, Great Expectations also abounds in action. The scenes involving Pip and Magwitch are especially notable for way action expresses character and thought.

Great Expectations also reeks of irony, something that is seldom noticed in more modern novels. Overstatements are created to draw the irony out into the open, where it is unmistakable. Yet the overstatements attract, rather than repel. The overstatements are like the theatrical make up which makes actors and actresses look strange in the dressing room, but more real on the stage when seen from the audience.

At the same time, the plot is deliciously complex in establishing and solving mysteries before that genre had been born. As you read Great Expectations, raise your expectations to assume that you will receive answers to any dangling details. By reading the book this way, you will appreciate the craft that Mr. Dickens employed much more.

This is the third time that I have read Great Expectations over the last 40 years. I found the third reading to be by far the most rewarding. If you like the book, I encourage you to read it again in the future as well. You will find that the passage of time will change your perspective so that more nooks and crannies of the story will reveal themselves to you.

If this is to be your first reading of the book, do be patient with the book's middle third. It may seem to you that the book is drifting off into a sleep-inducing torpor. Yet, important foundations are being lain for your eventual delight.

Mr. Dickens wrote two endings for Great Expectations. Be sure to read both of them. Which one do you prefer? I find myself changing my mind.

Give love with an open heart, without expectations!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A classic for all times., 19. Oktober 1999
This has to be my favourite Dickens novel. In fact, I would go so far as to place it alongside Flaubert's "Sentimental Education" and Dostoevsky's "Brothers Karamazov" as one of the great novels of the 19th century. I am astonished by the number of one and two star reviews even though they do appear to come mainly from high school students being "forced" to read the novel for English class. Judging by the spelling mistakes and grammatical errors which proliferate these submissions, Dickens is not the only thing that they've had trouble staying awake for. In addition, it is ridiculous to suggest that Dickens's novels were so lengthy because he was "being paid by the word." His books initially appeared in serial form as books were very expensive in the Victorian era and he understandably wished to avoid precluding large sections of his target readership from being able to sample them. The fact that some current "readers" find this novel "too long and boring" is, I believe, a sad reflection on our media saturated society where a two-second attention span is rapidly becoming the norm.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Toll gelesen von Hugh Laurie, ABER es wurde viel zu viel gekürzt!, 9. Februar 2007
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Great Expectations (Audio CD)
Toll gelesen von Hugh Laurie, die einzelnen Figuren erwachen wirklich zum Leben. ABER: die Kürzungen werfen die Erzählung sehr aus der Bahn! Schon klar, es ist die gekürzte Fassung, aber es wurde einfach zu viel und dann auch noch so plump gekürzt, dass man immer wieder stutzt. Die Geschichte wirkt so sehr fragmenthaft. SCHADE!

Nur zu empfehlen, wenn mans schon gelesen hat, ansonsten ist häufiges Stirnrunzeln angesagt.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Read it - even if you've seen the movie, 25. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Great Expectations (Taschenbuch)
I know lots of people will flay me for saying this, but this book has a lot of repeat value. I could read it every year, for five years at least without getting bored doing it. I had read the abridged version in school, and a year ago i had seen the movie (featuring gweneth paltrow and ethan hawke). I liked these so much that inspite of knowing the story i bought the unabidged version and was plesantly surprised how much i enjoyed it. Both the movie and the abridged version concentrate only with Pip's relation with estella. The book is infact much wider in its scope. For example Pip's relation with Mr.Pocket fills more pages than that with estella.
Charles dickens surely spins a superb yarn of pip, his ambitions, desires, weaknesses, and pureness of character which is so entirely credible and believeable that it seems like an autobiographical account told in the third person. This inspite of the novel containing eccentric characters like miss havisham difficult to find in actuality. Another important contribution of this novel is to portray the relation between pip and estella. Its extremely difficult to say what exactly it is. Infatuation? No. It was the very soul of his existance without which he could not exist. It lasted from childhood till the end. Love? Unlikely. He was torturing himself in her company and this can hardly be called love. Hatred? No. Vengence? No. On miss havisham's part maybe but not on that of pip or estella. There's no answer forthcoming. Just when we thought we were intelligent and mature enough to understand relationships Mr. Dickens comes along to tell us to start from kindergarten once again.
I found Mr. Dickens style of writing quite modern. Of course there's an influence of the times he lived in but the novel has a very modern tang. In fact if the means of transport were cars instead of horses, there was electricity instead of candle light and so on, making only such cosmetic changes the novel would definitely seem to be written very recently. I just realised - the movie proves this.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A literary masterpiece, 30. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Great Expectations (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Almost every negative review about this book was made by a 15 year old 9th grader. I also had to read this book when I was in ninth grade and I had no clue what was going on. Those kids might not want to admit it, but it was above thier understanding, I am proof of that. I decided to read this again and even though I was indifferant to it the first time I read, and realized it to be the literary genuis that it truely is. It has an amusing story line of the events that surround a young boy's life and how he copes with his coming into fortunes and life in general. But Dicken's masterful writing makes more than just a story line, it is also a social critique of Industeralized Society. For existance, Joe represents how life was before the Industerial Revolution. He was kind, hard working, morally upstanding, and happy, amoung other desirable qualities. Whereas Estella, for example, represented how it was during the Industerial Revolution. She was greedy, self-centered, controlling, and unhappy. This is also evident in Pip. At first he had the traits of the former, but once he got his "Expecations", he exhibited the traits of the latter. Another part of his critique was the differance between the rich and the poor. There are other important ways in which he portrays them, but for lack of time the poor people were happy, whereas the rich were unhappy. Dickens is also great at describing setting and characters, so as some might see that as boreing, I see that as giving more depth to the story. He makes it seem like the reader is actually in 19th century London and meeting such interresting characters as Jaggers, Mr. Pocket, and of course honorable Joe. Anyone concidering buying this that is in high school, I reccomend not buying this because you will not undersand it, hence dislike it. But anyone who is already out of high school, or someone who read it in high school I would reccomend this book. Dickens is well know in literary circles for his genuis, but for some reason I cannot explain, in popular culture he does not come close to the popularity of Shakesphere, even though he was writer and Social Critic.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen One of the top ten novels of the 19th century., 17. Juni 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Great Expectations (Taschenbuch)
I find myself surprised at the comments provided by earlier reviewers. One critic gave "Great Expectations" one star because he/she failed a test. Why should Dickens be blamed for that? Another said there was no structure (in a Dickens novel???). Another, that there was "little direction and less power." That there was no theme and no plot. Perhaps I am seeing things that aren't there but, whatever the shortcomings are, it is not in plot, themes, or characterization. It is the story of the orphan Philip Pirrip, known to everyone as Pip, from the age of about seven to the age of twenty-three, with a brief section at the end that takes place about eleven years later. Pip is being brought up "by hand" by his loud and quarrelsome sister and her kind and quiet husband, the blacksmith Joe Gargery. Young Pip is soon asked to serve in the home of Miss Havisham, who appears to be half mad since the day, years earlier, when she had been left at the alter by her old lover. Miss Havisham is raising a young girl named Estella to be heartless in her treatment of men when she grows up as a form of revenge against all men. And, Pip naturally falls in love with her. After a few years, Pip finds himself wealthy due to some unknown benefactor (who he mistakenly thinks is Miss Havisham and who he also believes has planned to have Estella marry him when they are older) and he now has "great expectations" made of him. He plans to become a gentleman and he leaves the kind and devoted Joe to live in London, Pip hoping to leave behind his humble past of which he now feels ashamed. After a few more years, he discovers that his unknown benefactor was Abel Magwitch whom he had helped when he was seven. Magwitch had been convicted and deported to Australia where he became a wealthy sheepman. Even though Magwitch was forbidden to return to England, he does so just to see the young man he had been helping to become a gentleman. Through problems with the law trying to arrest Magwitch, problems with Magwitch's past, the loss of the fortune and of Pip's great expectations, and through illness, Pip discovers the basic goodness in Joe, the devotion of Magwitch and of Pip's close friend Herbert Pocket, and what really is important. He discovers the value of family and of close friends and confidants. Estelle, who had married a cruel oaf, also learns her lessons and finds that she may have a heart as well (in the more common of the two endings of the novel). This is a great novel.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Grow Old First...Then Try It Again, 29. Dezember 1998
I, too, languished through this in High School. I, too, vowed never to pick up Dickens again. Then something happened. This is not bragging: it just happened. I grew up. Any intelligence I had mellowed into understanding, a very different faculty. Saddened, changed, I picked up Dickens again. And at last, I understood. Great Expectations isn't a classic for its language, plotting, style or wit. Like all Dickens' work, it is faulted in these areas. It's a classic because of Dicken's passion, which along with Bleak House pours onto the page and if you are at the right time of life, into your heart. So to all the reviewers here who find him problematic, wait a bit. Read a little about the nightmare world he lived in, the choked waterways slimey and poisonous with oil, feces and dye...the dangerous, airless shacks stacked up on each other, the rotten food...when it could be had at all. If you can, too, research a little into the social mores of the day, because what Dickens says about Victorian manners is quite true: virtue was often toggled to wealth in an absurd attempt to justify those unworthies clawing their way to the top of the "Beehive". Try Dickens again later, when you have grown old. He's a ripping good yarn, but you must forgive him...he sees people as tiny valiant miracles amidst a roiling world of injustice, farcical posturing, physical danger, ignorance and want, and he needs to tell you about it. He often jokes about it, because the society he was writing for was very touchy and required its medicine to be sugar coated. It is only after you've put a Dickens book down that the images--minus the wit--pour over you and like the smoke curling through a Dickens novel it occurs to you you cannot breathe...
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Far too boring for anyone with any sense of time, 20. Juni 1998
Von Ein Kunde
A great book in concept. However, Dickens was apparently paid by the word. Especially the silly ones, like "prithee" and "vittles". It is time that we stopped attacking freshmen honors students with this pretentious book, which serves only to drive them away from English forever. Nowhere near the best of Dicken's work, the book reads like a 19th century soap opera, without bathroom breaks and Snuggle-bear commercials. By the time the first interesting character returns to the novel, the reader is lucky if he or she hasn't choked to death on tears of frustration. Why is Estelle such a b****? Why is Ms. Havisham such an old hag? Why is Pip so utterly slackjawed that he permits 20 years of idiocy to be perpetrated upon his stale English carcass? Why, after all, doesn't his benefactor take care of business, murder the lot, and turn this into something vaguely enjoyable? Never mind the fact that Dickens couldn't choose an end, he apparently couldn't even choose a plot, wavering wildly between romance and mystery and the sort of English politics that Michael Palin would love to throw his pasty-white Anglo-Saxon hands about and throttle. Especially the politics. Do we really care about how an English attorney carries himself when we're 15 years old? Not bleeding likely. Powdered wigs and leg stockings sum up the bizarre nature of the staying power of this novel. It's about time that High School English teachers stopped telling one another how *good* this book is, and read it themselves, without the Norton Critical Teacher's Edition beside them. Especially when they have the advantage of alcoholic beverages.
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