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9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent perspectives to adopt to attain wealth.
Rich Dad's guide to Investing is mainly a repeat of his first two best selling books : Rich Dad/Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant.
The entire book is told in the style of a novel about the authors journey to be rich. The book was highly abstract and make you exited all the way until the very end about going about attaining wealth. However, at the end of the book,...
Veröffentlicht am 25. Juni 2000 von TonyD

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Not as good as his first two in the Rich Dad series.
Being a big fan of Rich Dad Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant, I was dying to read this book. Perhaps my expectations were too high, because I didn't like this book as much as the first two. There are some good nuggets of information in here, but it's not the life changing stuff that was Rich Dad Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant. I also felt like this book spent way too...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Juni 2000 von Amazon Customer


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9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent perspectives to adopt to attain wealth., 25. Juni 2000
Rich Dad's guide to Investing is mainly a repeat of his first two best selling books : Rich Dad/Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant.
The entire book is told in the style of a novel about the authors journey to be rich. The book was highly abstract and make you exited all the way until the very end about going about attaining wealth. However, at the end of the book, you're left with nothing of substance and you're bombarded by more advertisements of his products and I can't help but think to myself, 'THIS is how to be rich.'...ie. selling products about building wealth.
I read this book in about 3 days because it's light reading and you can skim 90% of it since it's filled with things like "I put down my cup of coffee. Looked into the sunset and asked rich dad how he made his wealth." So, obviously, theres LOTS of filler material and very little NEW information than from what was covered in his earlier books.
The reason this review seems so bad but I give him 4 stars is because the book is simply entertaining to read and despite it having only a couple of good points throughout the entire 400 page span of things, those points are worth a LOT and despite the abstract and theoretical nature of this book, it's still an excellent book since it's hard to do anything in practical reality without having a sound base of theory and philosophy underlying it.
The book mainly focuses upon building your own buisness, and having a million dollar net worth to invest in the "good investments" because of SEC regulations, and don't work for anyone else if you want to build true amounts of wealth (ie. millions).
This is definitely the best of his books AND a good book, but theres no reason to read more than one of his books because they're all repeats (and many times repeats within the same book).
Email comments definitely welcome!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen once again "wake up america", 22. Juni 2000
First of all, this book is not the authors third book. It's his fourth. Now the review begins. As one reviever mentioned, if you haven't read RDPD and Cashflow, don't read this book YET. As this is a story of his upbringing mentoring about achieving success (and this book is the third in a series). Now I found the book very stimulating in regards to the different investment choices of what rich people invest in and WHY (rich don't invest in what the poor do or the other investors-those who read Money magazine and the like) I truley believe this book is desgined for someone who has switched quadrants and this is particular book is for the business owner/system person getting ready to make thier move to the investor quadrant. IF you are looking for the book to give you answers on information for buying/selling or picking stocks then read John Sestinas newest book for he is the man on that subject matter/financial planning. If you are looking for basic principles and ideologies then read this again after reading RDPD and Cashflow. Sure is incredible how Rich can remember so many things his "rich" dad said... Still the books is great and worth the price.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Yes and no, 19. September 2000
On the one hand the book has many great ideas, is a good resource for business management in general, and many will find it motivational. On the other hand, it is quite superficial, often long-winded, and-especially towards the end-sloppily presented. It reminds the reader of the 'risks' inherent in not taking risks. Clearly, anyone hoping to retire comfortably after a life as an employee is likely to be disappointed, as was the author's "Poor Dad." His "Rich Dad" taught him to get the skills to become a successful business owner and eventually an investor, which is the path advocated in this and Kiyosaki's earlier two books. This volume takes a broad view of investing, cautioning readers away from get-rich-quick approaches. I recommend it, irrespective of the reader's level of business/financial education.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A must for those who want to be Financially Independent, 24. Juni 2000
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Ng Chon Hsing (Singapore) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
This book continues from where Kiyosaki left off in Cashflow Quadrant, his 2nd book in the trilogy (now complete with Rich Dad's Guide to Investing).
In his 1st book Rich Dad Poor Dad, Kiyosaki addressed the differences in mindsets between the Rich and the Poor. Then, in his 2nd book Cashflow Quadrant, he spoke on the 4 quadrants from which one can generate income. To be wealthy, Kiyosaki recommended that we learn to generate our incomes from the "B" (Business-owner) and "I" (Investor) quadrant as opposed to the "E" (Employee) and "S" (Self-employed) quadrant.
In his 3rd book Rich Dad's Guide to Investing, Kiyosaki tells how he got started in his investment journey, starting with nothing, and in fact at one stage, with a negative net worth. Most of us, having read his first 2 books, would have wondered if we could have embarked on our journey to become financially independent without much resource at hand. In this book, Kiyosaki shows how anyone can get started and how it does not take money to make money. He teaches how time is more important than money; how investing in one's self and getting an education and experience precedes excessive cash; how having a plan is more important than being in a hurry to make money.
This is not a book for those who want hot tips and quick fixes. This is a book on mindsets. Kiyosaki plants ideas and provides a road-map. The reader must take the first step and learn to navigate his/her own journey.
What I like about this book, is Kiyosaki's concept of being an Ultimate Investor, a "selling-investor". The Ultimate Investor creates deals and businesses that the public hunger for and are willing to pay a premium to acquire a share of. With the internet, it has never been easier to create businesses and deals which one can take public.
As in all his other books, Kiyosaki's book is worth reading again and again. I would also recommend that one reads Robert Allen's Multiple Streams of Income in conjunction with Kiyosaki's Rich Dad's Guide to Investing.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Not as good as his first two in the Rich Dad series., 13. Juni 2000
Von 
Being a big fan of Rich Dad Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant, I was dying to read this book. Perhaps my expectations were too high, because I didn't like this book as much as the first two. There are some good nuggets of information in here, but it's not the life changing stuff that was Rich Dad Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant. I also felt like this book spent way too much time trying to sell the more expensive courses that are on his website. To me, this book is not for the people that are trying to make the transition from the E and S Quadrant to the B and I. It is for the people already in B and I that are trying to improve their skills there.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A truly remarkable book, 13. Juni 2000
Von 
Michael Mendenhall "september17th" (Monterey, CA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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First of all, if you haven't yet read "Rich Dad Poor Dad" (RDPD) and "Cash Flow Quadrant" (CFQ) by the same author, do not buy or read this book until you do. If you are daring, buy all three at once. The bottom line is this: if you liked RDPD and/or CFQ you'll like this book. If you didn't like either one, then you won't like this new book either.
The tone of this book is very similar to RDPD in that it focuses on the infamous "Rich Dad." The difference is that this book is much more in depth. In fact, this book is monumental in length and information. It took me 3 days to get through all 400 pages of it. I was going to summarize each chapter, but there's 42 of them.
I would classify this is an advanced RDPD type book. A word of caution. This book meanders at times, and sometimes I got lost in all the stories waiting for the point to be made. The book makes its points in stories which is fine, but the author has a way of dragging them on and not really making the point so obvious. Alas, there's the beauty of it. It requires the reader to think. In fact, I plan to read it at least twice more in the next month or two. There's just too much information to absorb in one reading.
This book, like its predecessors, is not a "how to" book on getting rich. There's no magic formulas in here. You won't find a list of stocks to buy. In fact, you won't find any specific investment advice other than encouraging you to consult with professional advisers which is a little frustrating because I was hoping for a little hand holding. Considering this book is less than 20 bucks, what would one expect? If you're looking for specific methods, buy a book on stock picking. Certainly over your working life with a regular savings plan you can accumulate a lot of money through stocks. This book is about building a solid foundation, not about "how to" do it.
I found the early chapters to be very basic, but very, very good. His coverage of having a financial plan made me think long and hard. It's not about the investment product, it's the ultimate goal that matters. How many people have a financial plan? I didn't, and now I'm working on one thanks to this book. He also mentions something about three levels of financial planning, namely (1) security (2) comfort (3) rich. It took me a while to "get it," but I got it all right. Too many of us don't want to know anything about money, don't want a strong financial foundation, we just want to be rich. You've got to go through the steps.
As for quotes from the book, so far, these 2 are my favorites: "The key to success is laziness" [as opposed to "hard work"] and "For years, I grumbled and complained that school never taught me anything about money, business or becoming rich. I often wondered why they did not teach subjects I could use once I left school rather than teach subjects I knew I would never use."
I'm giving this book 5 stars as I have given his previous books the same rating. This really is a remarkable book. It is long, and I found myself getting impatient at times, but after reading it all the way through, I find myself planning to read it again. There's a wealth of information in here. Some of it sounds repetitive, but that's the way we learn. I would advise anyone buying this book to sit down after reading it and start making a financial plan for your life. Be patient with this book and after reading it through, read it again and take notes, and by all means take action. As always, email me with your thoughts and questions. I'm interested to hear other's reactions.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Create Your Investment Plan to Overcome Stalled Thinking, 10. Juni 2000
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
As in Rich Dad, Poor Dad, this book has the delightful story line of advice from the father of a friend who became a very wealthy man before his death -- leaving his family well set financially for 100 years! I think it's that base in reality that makes these books so interesting.
One of the best ways to learn is to have a successful mentor who will guide us through the key challenges of getting started. This book is designed to duplicate the experiences that the author had his his rich Dad. For example, the key questions that rich Dad asked him are at the end of each section for you to answer for yourself. I found my answers to be revealing, even though I have been through a lot of similar sets of questions. Well done!
The story line picks up after the author is coming out of the Marines in his twenties to find his boyhood friend already wealthy from his own efforts.
The financial advice parts of the book are tied into helping you pick up a meaningful financial plan. You begin by deciding what you want money to do for you. That's an excellent thing to do. Some want security. Some want more income. Others want substantial wealth that keeps growing. You should decide. Some books make the mistake of pushing you to choose a goal that really isn't what you want. Rather than push you in a particular direction, the book emphasizes key principles (compound cash tax-free, create assets with your mind as well as with your money). The author notes that each of us has preferences that will take us in different directions for implementing whatever our goals are. I liked that approach a lot.
You will recognize a lot of the diagrams from Rich Dad, Poor Dad. But it is good advice, so it doesn't hurt to have the repetition. This part is fairly compact, so you can skim through it if you feel confident about the material.
This book would be outstanding as a gift for someone who is about to graduate from school and starting a first job, or for newly wedded people. It would be even more valuable if you would be a mentor for the person you give it to, like one of your children or grandchildren.
If you get to be good at this now, think how great it would be to be the rich Dad for your children and their friends. Now that's an irresistibly great goal!
Enjoy the riches you would like to have, for the reasons you would like to have them!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Good, commonsense advice; a little flaky, 29. Juli 2000
This book extends the "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" toolkit with a reasonable degree of success. The foundation is similar (don't waste your money, think about total income and total cost, etc.), but this tacks on a fair amount of investment advice, explaining which assets are good and which aren't. To make a long story short, Kiyoski promotes cashflow at the expense of nominal income. This makes sense in some ways: simply owning a house that is theoretically appreciating in value may or may not be helpful to you, if you're never planning to sell it. On the other hand, it needs to be taken carefully, since most of us realize most of our investment gains from capital gains in one form or another.
So, read this book for the commonsense lifestyle adjustments, and enjoy the investment sections, but treat them with caution.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen An approach .... that works!, 13. Juli 2000
This book represents a proufound mindshift.
There is nothing new here, and yet it is all new.
Like his other works, this one 'continues the saga' as he makes an accurate and therefore excruciatingly painful case for 1. Realizing the importance of financial education, 2. Understanding how the rich think about money, and 3. Accepting (and implementing) the simple but profound paradigm shift needed to achieve financial freedom.
But here Kiyosaki goes into detail about a concept and stategies which were only mentioned briefly in earlier works---investing like the rich...read 'how the rich manufacture money.'
His first book presented his startling mindshift, almost in parable form without a lot of detail.
His second work expounded on the dynamics of cashflow.
This latest work is an in depth treatment of the ways in which the rich---and by extrapolation you and me, if we employ the same devices---can go about creating money out of thin air. It is truly thought provoking.
Many books (about success and/or money) are written by someone, who themselves apears to be aspiring to make money by writing books. They are often people who really don't seem to know much more than you or me, or whose works are full of untested platitudes or which require skills so specialized that the rest of us are all but left out. All we can do is look on in awe. Few books are really written by one of the masters, revealing his/her secrets. This is one.
Some have criticized Kiyosaki's works for being wordy. They misunderstand him. It is the layering approach to teaching. That is looking at the same diamond from many many different angles, layering one level of depth on the next, because the really profound truths cannot be grasped on the first go 'round in the snappy style of newspaper copy.
The riddle is clear, while brevity confusing. What's clearly articulated is easily brushed over. "Sure, sure" we say, and rush on thinking we understand, when we really don't. The riddle, on the otherhand, causes us to stop and ponder.
So, if you buy no other book this year or next, this should be the one.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent conclusion to a great series of books!, 3. Juli 2000
WELL DONE! This is how I would describe RDPD #3. This book reads swiftly and covers all the bases. It is not meant to give specific advice on what stocks to invest in since the author does not actively invest in the Market, rather it instructs you in what you should be learning to make better investing decisions. After reading this book you will be prepared to chart a course to wealth. This book is like a map to wealth and just like a map, after you read it you have to go out and FOLLOW directions.
In short, this book is a primer for investment self-education. It encourages the reader to increase one's financial education and details the road to take. It does not profess that the road is easy or without pitfalls (One chapter is on why the rich go broke) but it will put you on the road to wealth, which starts with education.
One reviewer said that it advertised more expensive courses on his web site. Interesting, since he does not have courses for purchase on his site. This is not Carlton Sheets! Also he does refer to his board game and other resources (tapes) but he has fewer than 10 references to them in a 400 page book. He also recommends others books just as much as his own. Hardly a sales pitch. Rather he encourages the reader to educate themselves, find a mentor if possible and get to work PLANNING for wealth! Dynamite Book.
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Rich Dad's Guide to Investing (English Edition)
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