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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Well paced and energetic, another coup for Gibson
To describe William Gibson's writing style in one word, it would probably be "energetic." Using a sharp staccato like pen, Gibson manages to construct unique and interesting scenarios. This book has all the characteristic Gibsonian qualities: distributed plot progression, characters covering both ends of the scale from cold and detached to drug crazed...
Veröffentlicht am 4. November 1999 von Naru Sundar

versus
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Has a sudden (and slightly incomprehensible) ending...
I've been a longstanding fan of Gibson's cyberpunk work since his groundbreaking novel, Neuromancer. This book continues his legacy of well-developed characters from the underbelly of the city. Gibson's virtuosity of prose is best shown in his vivid descriptions of the homeless living in Japan in a city of cardboard boxes.
Gibson's continual obsession with...
Veröffentlicht am 19. Juni 2000 von L.C.


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4.0 von 5 Sternen Well paced and energetic, another coup for Gibson, 4. November 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
To describe William Gibson's writing style in one word, it would probably be "energetic." Using a sharp staccato like pen, Gibson manages to construct unique and interesting scenarios. This book has all the characteristic Gibsonian qualities: distributed plot progression, characters covering both ends of the scale from cold and detached to drug crazed frenzy... it also manages to pull in a large number of characters from previous works (Virtual Light, Idoru).. Gibson's last trilogy (the Sprawl) was unique in that one never realized it was that much of a trilogy till the very end...
One annoying fact of this book is that it has a classic Gibson ending.. without giving anything away let's just say it required many readings of the ending before one felt satisfied. It seems the information density per sentence increases exponentially as one reaches the last few pages.
Still, the book is interesting and well worth the read..
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Has a sudden (and slightly incomprehensible) ending..., 19. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I've been a longstanding fan of Gibson's cyberpunk work since his groundbreaking novel, Neuromancer. This book continues his legacy of well-developed characters from the underbelly of the city. Gibson's virtuosity of prose is best shown in his vivid descriptions of the homeless living in Japan in a city of cardboard boxes.
Gibson's continual obsession with Japanese culture continues in this novel, and any anime otaku (extreme fan) will find many tributes to the pop culture of Japan. His finely tuned attention to detail in the scenes set in Japan made for highly entertaining reading.
In All Tommorow's Parties, we find ourselves once again associated with many of the characters in his previous novels, Idoru and Virtual Light. (Fortunately, the reader is not expected to 'know' these characters, so a previous reading of Idoru or Virtual Light will not preclude your enjoyment of this novel.)
However, by mid-novel, all this talk of nodal points fails to satisfy the reader - Gibson assumes too much of our understanding of the world that he has illustrated for us. Hints and allegations are made as to the significance of nodal points (that these points have the potential to bend the course of human history) but then these hints are never truly realized in any major way at the end of the novel. The novel ends suddenly, with no real feeling of resolution of the action that has come before. (I almost felt as if someone may have ripped the 'real' last chapter out of my copy.) We are dropped suddenly into this ending that does not seem nearly as elegantly constructed as the events leading up to it. Gibson's conclusions at the end of the novel are hardly cut-and-dry -- it takes work on the reader's part to try to understand his ending.
In conclusion, it's a worthy read, however, you may find yourself disappointed with the ending.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Not Gibsons' best..., 1. November 1999
Von 
L. Alper (Englewood CO) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
William Gibson is, without a doubt, the most masterful writer & predictor of the day after tomorrow. That said, I must admit "All Tomorrow's Parties" is not Gibson at his peak. Again, we're on "the Bridge", the brilliantly visualized "interstitial" community from "Virtual Light". The Bridge is one of Gibson's greatest conceits (after cyberspace) & it is always a pleasure to revisit. However, the events that bring us to this place never really seem to happen or even to be everted, & the cast of characters we are visiting it with really don't have much of a reason to be involved with the story except that Gibson seems to be stuck in the dreaded SF TRILOGY mode. Either he or his publishers seem convinced that his novels have to be published in triads ("Neuromancer", "Count Zero" & "Mona Lisa Overdrive" being the Sprawl cycle & now we have "Virtual Light", "Idoru" & "All Tomorrow's Parties" as the...what?... Bridge? cycle....)Unfortunately, this mind set does Gibson a dis-service as it requires him to stretch out stories & events that were clearly completed to his satisfaction in earlier works. "All Tomorrow's Parties" is very simply, a book in search of a plot. It seems to consist primarily of short sketches that are woven together but never really go anywhere. Gibson has introduced some new elements to his writing including a character based on himself & humor but if you're not a die hard Gibsonian this will be wasted on you. Basically, if you are unfamiliar with the man's writing, don't start here! Please, read the diamond sharp writing of "Neuromancer" or "Mona Lisa Overdrive" before picking this one up.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen liked reading it, dissapointed with the ending, 10. Januar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I was introduced to Gibson in 90 by someone who could have well been a character in a Gibson short story. I can't remember how many times I've read and re-read the first four books. I keep a copy of Neuromancer on my Pilot. I liked Virtual Light and really liked Idoru, but if All Tomorrows Parties is supposed to be a conclusion to this trilogy I am even more dissapointed than if it were just a stand alone book.
I like the writing style, the quick prose and short chapters (like channel surfing between related programs), but my two beefs are the seemingly rushed/unresolved ending/plot elements. What happened to Laney in his box and what did the nano fax have to do with Rei Toei anyway? I would have liked to read more about Harding. The thing which seemed most forced was the last watch. Why was it connected to Harding and how could it be used to find him?  As sort of a nit picking aside, I still can't figure out why the book is titled All Tomorrows Parties. All the previous Velvet Underground references seemed to fit the stories (especially "First thing you learn is that you always gotta wait") but this one?
I don't read Gibson for "poetic" endings. I'm not whining for the "good old days" of Mona Lisa Overdrive, but I did not like this ending and am not satisfied if this is the end of this trilogy. Since this is not a long book I can't imagine that some fool editor cut out anything, maybe Gibson is trying to change? If so I'll wait for the paperback next time.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen not why I read William Gibson, 19. Juli 2000
Von 
Thomas Breit (Shoreline, WA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The thing I crave about Gibson's books is the density of description, the way so much information is packed into one paragraph, that if you tried to explain it to someone else, it'd take you two pages. Even his titles rock: "Burning Chrome," "Count Zero," and they're even better after you read the book. That was not so much in evidence in "Idoru," and it's completely missing in "All Tomorrow's Parties." His prose style has shifted to plain, normal writing. I guess the intent of his "compressed" style was to replicate the density of information in the world he describes, and that density just isn't there in this story. Sure, there are still the cool technologies and weapons (a low-tek disposable gun that shoots hunks of chain, from one of the former Soviet republics, giant blimps haul water from Alaska to LA) and the vision of the future world is as convincing as ever. I suppose it's a good introduction to Gibson, but if you've come from his earlier work, you'll probably be a little disappointed. Another reviewer said that the book needed more explication. To me, there's too much explanation, too much laying out of what's going on. Part of what gives Gibson's books their gritty immediacy is that the characters know, kind of, what's going on, but they know they can't control or even fully understand their world, the best they can do is try to stay alive in it. I don't know, to me it's a little like the Eric Clapton from Derik and the Dominoes and Blind Faith recording "Willie and the Hand Jive."
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Gibson's best work in a long time, 26. Oktober 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
All Tomorrow's Parties is easily the best in the trilogy that began with Virtual Light. The quality of the prose Gibson writes makes this book a pleasure to read. The excellent pacing of the book makes it hard for the reader to put down. The use of short chapters makes keeping up with the diverse population of characters easy. While it may not surmount Neuromancer, All Tomorrow's parties is certainly worth picking up.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen One word short of 5 stars!, 28. November 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Neuromancer is one of my favorite books (especially after about a dozen readings), and I read all of Gibson's books up through The Difference Engine, but I will shamefully admit I somehow overlooked the first two books in this trilogy, so my perspective may be unique.
First, my one complaint: why does Gibson use the word "website"? Since websites are so grounded in technology, and technology changes so quickly, I don't see that term being in use 5-10 years from now. After all, how many people still know what gopher, archie, and veronica are (were)? Admittedly, many of Gibson's readers know these terms, but the public as a whole does not. I don't know what words and tech will supplant the web, but I do know that it will happen, and Gibson missed his chance to tell us. This one little word nearly shattered my suspension of disbelief, but I managed to work my way through it.
With that out of the way, the rest of the writing is very exciting. Early in the book, one of the characters looks out the window of a van and notes, "What were those white things, so many of them, off in a field there? Wind things: they made electricity." I love this quote! So simple, but it evokes such a clear image in the reader's mind. The majority of the book is like that, in fact, so much so that I know I will grow to love this book more and more with each re-reading.
The characters are superbly written. I especially liked Boomzilla. Every kid would love to have him as a friend; but that would be every parent's nightmare. Boomzilla reserves a place right up there with Molly in my list of favorite Gibson characters.
As for the plot, I liked it. The alternating storylines and short chapters kept me reading well into the night because I had an intense desire to know what would happen next. Possible spoiler: I thought the ending was very much like Neuromancer in that we are left with the knowledge that technology has greatly evolved, but the ramifications of that evolution are left for the reader to ponder on his/her own time.
Overall, an excellent book, and I look forward to reading the first two books in this trilogy.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Gibson's best book yet, maybe...., 3. November 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Ignore the adoloscent losers who are stuck on Neuromancer. The fact is our cyber future is not going to be filled with one dimensional badasses who do badass things to badass people with badass computers. Cyberspace is real, and it's in the here and now, and badasses line up it alongside married housewives from Chicago who talk about Beanie Babies online. This is the real future, and Gibson is not a prophet, as so many want him to be. He's someone who finds the patterns in culture at large and uses sci fi to extend or pardoy those patterns, and this new book is the culmination of an older, wiser Gibson. I mean, what better motivation can there be in the future for a character (like Rydell) than wanting to have a steady job? That pressure is tremendous and a great deal more pertinent today for millions of people than whether or not someone can crack a dbase. As well, Gibson is in person a very funny guy, and this is his first truly hilarious book, one that actually made me laugh out loud. And this is the first William Gibson book which cannot be denied, as some scholars to do his other work, actually is about something. His prose has become sharper and more lucid than before, and with this I truly think he is becoming the Cormac McCarthy of science fiction - a down south good ol boy working in an established genre and tearing it up and down. As for complaints about the ending - well you just have to look hard enough. It does make sense, and it gave me chills. I'll give you a hint: Neal Stephenson cheated nanotech by insisting that with it would come a new social order which would displace the ramifactions of a post production culture and keep us human. Gibson remains true to the essential otherworldliness of that tech and the book does end well, with a hint of a new world to come, one that cannot be expressed in language or current imagination. Fill in the blanks for yourself, grow up, figure out that the Net is just a giant strip mall with some nice communication capabilities, and read this book. Let the otaku crowd obsess because they'll never relax enough to understand.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Gibson's gone downhill since _Neuromancer_, 1. Dezember 1999
Von 
P. Ravenscroft "philip3636" (Pennsylvania, United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Gibson's first three books were taut, suspenseful and visionary. From _Virtual Light_ on, Gibson has lost some of the edge that made him so interesting. Other than its nonsensical title, All Tomorrow's Parties is a series of vignettes of 'cool people' and 'cool stuff'. It comes as no suprise to see a full length picture of Gibson himself clad in Armani proudly displaying a latest-model Motorola cell phone clipped to his belt. He appears himself to have succumbed to the 'cool gadget' measure of success.
Early on, Gibson was appaled at those who seemed to take his ideas as cues to build neat new toys. A prime example would be 3-D Virtual Reality meant to be viewed through goggles-remember VRML?
Rather than bristling at technophiles blindly attempting to implement his ideas, Gibson appears to have joined the ranks of the most sanguine of techno-boosters, a bleeding edge that worships things like the newest Motorola and that is chronicled by Wired Magazine.
Whether as a result of this or not, his novels have suffered. _All Tomorrow's Parties_, like the other books that share the same characters, is low on suspense but high on glitz (All preparation and no H). It is an enjoyable read simply because the characters, the locales and the devices are cool. But the plot line is slack and, frankly, things like sovereign franchise are handled better by the likes of Neal Stephenson. Where Gibson used to outshine his cyberpunk peers like Rudy Rucker and Bruce Sterling, he is now eclipsed by greater talents, particularly that of Stephenson.
Recommended to those who simply can't miss the latest Gibson. If you're not hooked yet, pick up a copy of -_Neuromancer_.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Sizzling, absorbing prose; OK plot, 31. Oktober 1999
Von 
Stefan Jones (Suburbs of Portland, OR) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: All Tomorrow's Parties (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The players from "Virtual Light" and "Idoru" converge on the squatter's community on San Francisco's Bay Bridge, guided by ominous signs and protents in cyberspace. Something _big_ is about to happen, and whether it's big-bad or big-ambiguous depends on who can get their hands on a certain spun aluminum cylinder with nonstandard network connections.
Gibson's _writing_ is better than ever. I'm reminded of the "word wooze" of Lieber's "The Silver Eggheads": Writing so sleek that it leaves the reader reeling and dopey. The cultural and physical settings are brilliant imagined.
The plot, on the other hand, is oddly familiar; there's an odd resonance between it and that of _Mona Lisa Overdrive._ In both, the world is rushing toward something trancendent; in both, a physically bottomed-out hacker is pulling strings; both have a maguffin necessary for the transcendence. They're far from _identical_ stories, but they're enough alike that one wonders if W.G. was having so much fun writing vivid and hilarious pages that he left the plot on auto.
There's one _dues ex machina_ near the end that I found a bit annoying, and the very ending is ambiguous: It could be either utterly lame, or a brilliant subtle microcosm of what the world has become.
In any case: A keeper, and a must if you liked the other books in the sequence.
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[All Tomorrow's Parties] [by: William Gibson]
[All Tomorrow's Parties] [by: William Gibson] von William Gibson (Taschenbuch - 4. Februar 2003)
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