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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Worth the Charts
The charts alone are worth the low price. Anyone desiring to see how the Kosmos fits together needs this book. It organizes and explains his ideas as clearly as always, allowing academics and others to better orient themselves when reconciling and understanding their disciplines. While we await Volume 2 of his trilogy, I heartily appreciate Ken's willingness to provide...
Veröffentlicht am 12. Mai 2000 von Jeffrey J. Beigel

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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen What about something new?
I am a big fan of Wilber. I am using him as a central point in my dissertation. So take the following comment for what it's worth:
Come on Ken, what about something new? We've read about the spectrum of consciousness, holons, the four quadrants and so on for years. Anyone with Vol. 4 of your Collected Works has the charts in this text and so doesn't need to buy...
Veröffentlicht am 30. Mai 2000 von Paul Jerry


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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Worth the Charts, 12. Mai 2000
The charts alone are worth the low price. Anyone desiring to see how the Kosmos fits together needs this book. It organizes and explains his ideas as clearly as always, allowing academics and others to better orient themselves when reconciling and understanding their disciplines. While we await Volume 2 of his trilogy, I heartily appreciate Ken's willingness to provide us with a regular fix to our addiction to his insights. Ken is a national treasure. Buy this book.
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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen What about something new?, 30. Mai 2000
Von 
Paul Jerry (Medicine Hat, Alberta Canada) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
I am a big fan of Wilber. I am using him as a central point in my dissertation. So take the following comment for what it's worth:
Come on Ken, what about something new? We've read about the spectrum of consciousness, holons, the four quadrants and so on for years. Anyone with Vol. 4 of your Collected Works has the charts in this text and so doesn't need to buy it
Please, let us hear something new!
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5 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Consciousness Restored!, 18. Mai 2000
With this book Ken Wilber accomplishes something extraordinary. In lucid, lively, and often humorous writing, he presents a model of psychology and spirituality that, unlike anything before it, fully integrates--in a _completely_ reasonable manner--every facet of serious mental and spiritual investigation ever devised.
Standing in the middle of a room called reality, Wilber sees four corners--the subjective ("I"), objective ("It"), intersubjective ("We"), and interobjective ("Its")--and realizes the obvious: the world is not constructed as strictly "objective" and material, nor purely "subjective" and mental, nor the plurals of those, but somehow _all of them at once_. Reality has four corners to it (or, for simplicity's sake, three dimensions: subjective, cultural, and objective; or I, We, and It; or first-person, second-person, and third-person aspects), and none of these corners can be simply "reduced" to, or derived from, any other. All four corners of reality arise together, along with a single universal room, and while they are indeed irreducible to each other, they are all mutually determining, inseparable, and incessantly interacting. Thus, standing in the middle of this Kosmic room, Wilber gives consciousness its due, permitting it to roam freely about the room and saving it, so to speak, from the immemorial punishment of standing in a particular corner while its parents decided what to do with their problematic child.
The mysteries that Wilber's model solves are numerous. When the four-quadrant model is coupled with the traditional spiritual insight called the "Great Chain of Being"--which sees reality as a multidimensional spectrum of being and knowing, ranging from matter to life to mind to soul to spirit--the human "self" finally regains the complexity that everyone naturally intuits, but few psychological and spiritual systems acknowledge. Wilber gives the "self-system" continuum, stretching from most fundamental ("proximate") to least fundamental ("distal"), as: (1) "I-I" (Spirit, God, pure Consciousness, true Self); (2) "I" (ego, individual self); (3) "me" (aspects of oneself seen objectively, such as, for the average adult, her physical body); and (4) "mine" (external possessions and associations that define oneself). In the evolution of the "overall self," the "I" at one stage becomes the "me" at the next, transcending and including lower levels of reality, and this process opens consciousness to increasingly integral vistas. As Wilber explains: "[W]hat you are identified with (or embedded in) at one stage of development (and what you therefore experience very intimately as an 'I') tends to become transcended, or disidentified with, or de-embedded at the next, so you can see it more objectively, with some distance and detachment. In other words, the _subject_ of one stage becomes an _object_ of the next" (p. 34). And when one reaches a level of _absolute_ transcendence, wherein _all_ things, including the sense of "I," become objects in awareness, then one opens to the mystical realization of enlightenment, which Wilber devotes considerable attention to (making this book worthwhile reading for even those spiritually-inclined people who wouldn't normally read psychology or transpersonal psychology texts). The fluid progression of the overall self through these increasing levels of consciousness, and also through the different _lines_ of these levels (such as the spiritual-development line, as well as the cognitive, moral, affective, interpersonal, worldview, empathic lines, et al.) forms the backbone of the treatise, with everything else ultimately related to this evolutionary process.
Just as significant is a remarkable chapter (and its footnotes) in which Wilber explains how the mind and brain can finally unite--first meeting each other with the conceptual understanding that inside and outside, subject and object, are two mutually-arising corners of the Kosmic room, as irreducible to each other as two sides of a coin, and then embracing each other in the "All is Spirit" vision revealed when consciousness develops to the level of perfect nondual enlightenment.
A full summary of this book and its merits would likely be wordier than the very concise text itself, but just to give a hint of what's explored within, here is a list of some more of the topics covered: the history of psychology, the perennial philosophy, the nature of holons and holarchies, the types of mysticism (psychic, subtle, causal, nondual), the types of spirituality (translative and transformative), the types of spiritual experience (peak, plateau, and permanent adaptation), the meme scheme of _Spiral Dynamics_ and ample discussions of other research, the pathologies that can be encountered on each level of development, a brief history of sociocultural evolution, the relation of transitory states of consciousness and stable structures of consciousness, the distinction between cultural-specific surface structures and universal deep structures, the fallacies of scientific materialism, the relations of the ego, the soul, and the Witness (or Spirit), and plenty of charts and figures to help make sense of it all.
Surprisingly, this book holds together extremely well, and it isn't nearly as complicated as the above summary might lead one to suspect. _Integral Psychology_ is just a model, a framework, around which Wilber hopes future investigations might follow. It isn't meant to be fully fleshed out and comprehensive, but for what it does explain--for what it tentatively integrates--it's more than well worth the consideration of anyone interested in the nature of mind and spiritual development. Truly, the utterly liberating sanity and clarity of this work cannot be overstated. From Aurobindo in the East to Piaget in the West, nearly every tenable analysis of the nature of consciousness adds a brick to this, the foundation of an edifice that, in coming years, can only help to restore meaning and sanity to the life of any self fortunate enough to walk its halls.
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