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5.0 von 5 Sternen Out there on your own
This is Krakauer's account and report on a young man - it is a true story - who left his family after graduating with honors, burning his money, cutting off all his ties to his background and venturing out on his own, travelling thoughout the United States. His ultimate adventure was to survive in the wilderness of Alaska. This, however, led to his premature death...
Veröffentlicht am 7. November 2004 von Peter Berlin

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3.0 von 5 Sternen wonderful complicated journey
INTO THE WILD is a confusing book with a great plot for discussing. About three plot lines are carried on at the same time, where the auther Jon Krakauer is telling his story, side charectors stories are added in for benefit, and the main plot that continues on through the entire story. The main plot focuses on a young man, Chris McCandless, who has money and sucess and...
Veröffentlicht am 19. Mai 2000 von heather


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5.0 von 5 Sternen the call of the wild, 10. August 2009
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild. Film Tie-In (Taschenbuch)
First things first: "Into the wild" is not a novel but rather a lengthy reportage in book format. Structure and style are strongly journalistic.

Taking McCandless's vagabond life as a starting point, the author reflects on (as Jack London put it) the call of the wild, the yearning for isolation and loneliness and the will to test one's limits surrounded by a challenging nature. Roughly half of the book tells McCandless's story and how he ended up as a twentysomething leading a vagabond life in America's Southwest till he went to Alaska where he died of starvation. (The book starts with McCandless's death so don't think I spoiled it.) ;-)

The other half deals with other rather famous people who succumbed to the call of the wild, Krakauer being one of them himself - yet unlike others he survived. The author also interviews McCandless's family, friends and acquaintances. He highlights the loss and pain the family suffered.

Ultimately, Krakauer thinks that youth, idealism and a certain unwillingness to forgive other people's mistakes are some of the main reasons why people go into the wild and severe all contact with their families.

On this edition: The Pan/Macmillan edition (ISBN-10: 0330455842, ISBN-13: 978-0330455848) is cheap - and not much else. I don't really like books with the cover of a movie, but this cover includes an especially awful "Now a Major Motion Picture blah blah blah". The font used is rather small (I guess about 10 or 9 points). On the positive side, this edition includes 4 black and white maps (2 Alaska, 2 Colorado River). In conclusion, despite the fact that I loved the book itself, I do not really recommend this particular edition.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen INTO THE WILD...INTO YOUR HEART, 30. Juli 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
This is a poignant, compelling narrative of an intelligent, intense, and idealistic young man, Chris McCandless, who cut off all ties to his upper middle class family, and reinvented himself as Alexander Supertramp, a drifter living out of a backpack, eking out a marginal existence as he wandered throughout the United States. A modern day King of the Road, McCandless ended his journey in 1992 in Alaska, when he walked alone into the wilderness north of Denali. He never returned.
Krakauer investigates this young man's short life in an attempt to explain why someone who has everything going for him would have chosen this lifestyle, only to end up dead in one of the most remote, rugged areas of the Alaskan wilderness. Whether one views McCandless as a fool or as a modern day Thoreau is a question ripe for discussion. It is clear, however, from Krakauer's writing that his investigation led him to feel a strong, spiritual kinship with McCandless. It is this kindred spirit approach to his understanding of this young man that makes Krakauer's writing so absorbing and moving.
Krakauer retraces McCandless' journey, interviewing many of those with whom he came into contact. What metamorphasizes is a haunting, riveting account of McCandless' travels and travails, and the impact he had on those with whom he came into contact. Krakauer followed McCandless' last steps into the Alaskan wilderness, so that he could see for himself how McCandless had lived, and how he had died. This book is his epitaph.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Consideration of Style and Presentation, 3. Mai 2000
Von 
Dennis J. Buckley (Harrisburg, PA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
It is difficult, perhaps impossible, to write a review of thisbook without pronouncing judgments. But let me be clear from theoutset that I am not here joining the ongoing debate into thecharacter, motivations or judgment of either Chris McCandless or Jon Krakauer. Such detachment is not easy as this volume is both a biography and autobiography of values, and I have discussed it from that perspective with my own family and friends.
The book is well-written, and Krakauer has performed a neat bit of detective work in piecing together McCandless' story. The subject matter-- a young man's odyssey...-- is compelling. I suspect that the extensive number of reviews reflects just how compelling and contentious the subject of this book is. The paperback suffers from the lack of photgraphs and visual documentation available in the hardcover edition. The stark, essential facts are still here, however.
Krakauer's own bias is clear and admitted. That is to his credit. There is no rule that says an author must be detached. Indeed, Krakauer's involvement in his story strengthens and focuses his prose.
I strongly recommend this book to other parents. If it makes you think and worry, and if it inclines you to ACT by teaching children basic survival skills, so much the better.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Packendes Abenteuerbuch, dass man in einem Zug lesen muss, 30. Oktober 2001
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
Unglaublich, wie ausführlich sich Krakauer mit dem Leben des Einzelgängers und Abenteurers
McCandless beschäftigt hat um daraus ein athemberaubendes und faszinierendes Buch zu schreiben, dessen Inhalt jeden reisefreudigen Leser packt. Ich war wie gefesselt vom eindrucksvollen Leben und Ueberleben das jungen Amerikaners McCandless, der unserer Zivilation den Rücken gekehrt hat, um sich voll und ganz dem Lauf der Natur hinzugeben. Mitreissend bis zum letzten Wort!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A tragic story -- as told by one who understands, 12. Juli 2000
Von 
Brian D. Rubendall (Oakton, VA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
After researching his story, Jon Krakauer came to understand why the subject of his unforgettable book "Into the Wild" hiked into oblivion in the first place. Krakauer understands the mentality of a foolish youth who would risk life and limb in the hopes of great adventure. He understands, as he relates, because he once was that youth. Krakauer is a master storyteller whose prose evokes vivid images not only of the last two years of Chris McCandless's life, but also of that strange breed of person who is drawn to Alaska to get as far away as possible from the constraints of life in the lower 48. McCandless's story is fascinating and Krakauer does a great service to his memory.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen wonderful complicated journey, 19. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
INTO THE WILD is a confusing book with a great plot fordiscussing. About three plot lines are carried on at the same time,where the auther Jon Krakauer is telling his story, side charectors stories are added in for benefit, and the main plot that continues on through the entire story. The main plot focuses on a young man, Chris McCandless, who has money and sucess and gives it all up for a life of wandering and freedom. While this may be the plotline for thousands of other books, INTO THE WILD was pleasantly (or disturbingly) twisted by Jon Krakauer into a complicated dance of really living, and death. Chris McCandles dies, we find that out in the first chapter. After we find out about his death though, the reader gets a chance to meet the people who played a role in McCandless' search for self. Starting out with Jim Gallien, "Gallien wondered whether he'd picked up one of those crackppots for the lower forty-eight who come north to live out ill-considered Jack London fantasies. Aslaska has long been a magnet for dreamers and misfits. . ." As readers, we meet a chain of colorful charectors who help him along the way. The problem with this plot line is that the charectors are not always introduced in a logical way. They also do not necessarily make sense when they are introduced into the story line. Start a new chapter, such as chapter nine, and an entirely new plot is started. We have a new charector named Everett Russ. He wants to climb around a place called Davis Gulch. The language is beautiful in this section "Tall grasses sway in the breeze. The ephemeral bloom of a sego lily peeks from the toe of a ninety-foot stone arch, and the canyon wrens call back and forth in plaintive tones from a thatch of scrub oak. High above the creek a spring seeps from the cliff face, irrigating a growth of moss and maidenhair fern. . .", the language is beautiful in the rest of the book. This is a very important fact. Sometimes the eloquent language is the only thing binding a reader to this book. One of the most important thing about INTO THE WILD is the ending though. In the last 100 pages many important issues are brought up that make the book worth reading. 1) We learn about the how starvation affects the body 2) We hear the effects of McCandless' adventures on his family, and how they deal with his death 3) Much moral thought is addressed about the passions and desires of young people and 4) (the most important :) ) we learn wild sweetpea and wild potato information. Take my word for it, if you have the time to really think about this book, and the friends to read it with you to help you understand the difficult parts, then it is a wonderful experiance with a lot of good thinking. If you want an easy read though, this is not the book for you.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Into the Mind, 10. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
Into the mind
I recently read the Jon krakauer book Into the Wild. This was a very good book about a boy just out of college and on a mission. He eventually wanted to live in the interior of Alaska, a bitter and harsh environment. Chris didn't get there right away; he stopped in many places, like Arizona, North Dakota, and California. He was somewhat a drifter, and couldn't stay in one place for more than 2 months. He liked to live off the land and looking death straight in the eye. That's exactly what happened, he was found dead in Alaska. This isn't giving anything away, because it's in the very beginning of the book. This book isn't really an account of what happened to Chris McCandless, but more of why he did this, and how he became the person he was. It really analyzes Chris's life as well as other people who like to "live off the land." I really enjoyed this book, which is why I gave it 4 stars. I've never known or heard of anyone who goes into the wilderness and just lives there. So this book really kept me interested, which is really important. I didn't like it just because it was a new subject for me; I also liked it because of what a good author Jon is. He describes everything in detail, and you have a really good picture in your mind of what he's talking about. I also liked it because you can form you own ideas about how Chris died exactly, or how he became the way he was, the author just didn't come right out and say "this is how it has to be." You could let your mind wander. I didn't give this book 5 stars because it did get a little boring at some parts. The author talked about a lot of other people who died in the wilderness like Chris. I didn't think this was very important to the story line.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Into the wild mind of Chris McCandless, 26. April 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
Into the wild is a story of an intelligent, well-off young man with everything going for him until he decided that money, education and materials are meaningless. The same determination that helped Chris McCandless excel as a high school cross-country star enables him to survive the lifestyle he comes across after college. He rides the rails, canoes to Mexico on impulse and survives it all on nothing more than wits, luck and an ever-present bag of rice. In an increasingly crowded world, it was difficult for McCandless to find the physical isolation he sought, but his inward journey was more important than his external surroundings. Krakauer, a writer for Outside magazine who obviously shares McCandless' wanderlust, explains often-mysterious inclinations in a clear and revealing way. "In coming to Alaska, McCandless yearned to wander uncharted country, to find a blank spot on the map," Krakauer writes. "In 1992, however, there were no more blank spots on the map in Alaska not anywhere. But Chris, with his peculiar logic, came up with an elegant solution to this dilemma: He simply got rid of the map. While McCandless viewed nature and solitude as the keys to fulfillment, he profoundly touched those he encountered on the road prior to his fatal journey to Alaska. He comes across as engaging yet ultimately unapproachable in his brash pursuit of raw, austere experience. Krakauer succeeds in capturing McCandless' unique personality even as he establishes links between his subject and a loose alliance of adventurers who also took to the wild in search of meaning and identity. Over the years, Alaska has been a magnet for intrepid characters that trek into the bush, never to reappear. For example, Gene Rosellini, the son of a wealthy Seattle restaurateur, hoped to return to a natural state by scavenging and hunting game with spears and snares. He endured Alaska's bitter winters clad only in rags and fashioned a windowless hut without benefit of saw or ax. After declaring this experiment a failure, Rosellini made plans to walk around the world, but he never got the chance. He was found lying face down on the floor of his shack in 1991, dead of a self-inflicted knife wound to the heart. Krakauer's own foolhardy, yet determined, attempts to climb "an intrusion of diorite mountain called the Devils Thumb" in Alaska during his youth sheds still further light on McCandless. Based on his own experience, Krakauer convincingly argues that McCandless wasn't suicidal, as many have speculated. Despite his fate, it is difficult to say that McCandless died in vain. Or to deny that his approach to life is an enviable one in many respects. Although McCandless would probably laugh at the notion, he is a profoundly American figure, uncompromising in his approach and thoroughly optimistic about the future. In an age when the idea of "roughing it" is like having a sport-utility vehicle and thousands of dollars in camping equipment, McCandless was in touch with the essential essence of nature. He is also a reminder of what can happen when you take an all-or-nothing approach into the wild. This is truly a story that gives man respect for nature's beauty along with its principal dangers.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen DIFFERENT from _Into Thin Air_, but at least as good, 25. April 2000
Von 
GG "GG" (San Francisco, CA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
I read _Into the Wild_ before _Into Thin Air_, as a random pickup in the San Francisco airport. It consumed me through the entire flight and regretfully was over when we landed. It seems that some reviewers have focused on how little sympathy they have for McCandless, the "poor little rich kid" who died in the wilderness alone. It's interesting that the same people enjoyed Into Thin Air, which could be called a story about a whole group of "poor little REALLY rich kids." This isn't the way either book grabbed me.
Into the Wild was a fascinating story about that mysterious quality in some people that drives them to be as alone as possible-- away from people, away from family, away from civilization. We are shown with several examples (not just McCandless) that this quality drives these people to sacrifice their belongings, their comfort, even their personal safety in pursuit of complete solitude. As we see in the beginning of the book (don't worry, I'm not giving anything away!), this compulsion often ends in death, alone and isolated. There is a real tragic element to the way Krakauer asks "Why do they do this? What is missing for them in life? What are they searching for?"
Part of what makes the book so interesting is that Krakauer identifies with these people, and candidly admits to having a streak of the loner-adventurer in him. His story and those of many other interesting, mysterious wanderers are interwoven with the main story about McCandless. Krakauer's personal identification with the story brings you that much closer to the mystery, even if you've never felt the compulsion to walk out on civilized life and leave everyone and everything behind you (how many people haven't felt that way at some point?).
Comparing this book to Into Thin Air seems inevitable considering that book's success. I would say Into the Wild is just as engaging, but much more personal. It is just as tragic but the source of the tragedy is the mysterious human character, not really the battle against the forces of nature. To me, Into the Wild was powerfully interesting on a personal level, where Into Thin Air was engaging as an adventure/disaster story.
I highly recommend this book. Don't shortchange yourself on Krakauer by stopping with Into Thin Air. Into the Wild is some of his best work!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Funny what time'll do to an opinion, 14. März 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Into the Wild (Taschenbuch)
Three years ago I was infuriated with Chris McCandless. "Every man has the desire to set off on a journey of his own," I told a friend with whom I worked. "At our age {I was then the same age as McCandless was at the time of his death.} it is normal to want to create a reality where it is you versus them. We are now grown up, after all. We are Men. Men in a world that our parents created. Men in a world that we do not like. Men in a world that does not like us. And the only way we can get them to like us is to become exactly like them. Who wants to work forty plus hours a week for a boss who would just as soon fire you so that he or she could keep their indoor pool heated during the winter? Who would want that really? No one. But that is where disipline comes in. This is what Chris lacked..." I went on and on on this tangent. And for the most part I believed it. I honestly felt that Chris was a coward and an egotist. Why, I asked, would Chris take photos of himself if he planned to rough it for the sake of roughing it? Are photos not for the benefit of others to shuffle through while nodding in amazement? "You really killed a moose and ate it? Wow!" I saw Chris as a poseur. I saw him using the outdoor lifestyle the way that Hollywood moviestars use Yoga or kickboxing or Tibet: a personality's fashion accessory to casually toss across the conversation table in the hopes of impressing those on the other side. I put the book away. Three years passed. Yesterday I reread Into the Wild. I am no longer angry at Chris. Somethings happened to me in those three short years that gave me insight into Chris' vision. {I will not bore you with the details of my life's trials and tribulations.} My anger is replaced with respect. Chris lived his life as he chose and he faced his death with courage. In the four months Chris lived off the land and lived his dream, Chris came closer to the essence of being human than most others would ever come if they lived for a hundred years in the safety and security of a life closed in by a white picket fence. Chris' death is tragic and there is considerable talk of the waste of potential due to a 'lack of respect for the power of mother nature.' Perhaps this is true. Perhaps if Chris emerged from those woods, gaunt, weakened, and wise, he would write a great American novel that would touch the masses and remind us all of our connection to the land. Perhaps but unlikely. Most likely Chris would leave the woods and write a book, as his expressed an intent to do, that would be published by a small press and read only by his close friends and family. Chris would continue his pattern of a few months in society followed by an exodus into the unknown. His amazing tales would be told over beers and a dishfull of nuts but the rest of us would never know of Alex Supertramp. Chris died and that is what gives his story the emotion that make a bestseller. And being a bestseller, we are here talking about it. And because we talk, some of us will learn. And that is the point, isn't it? To learn. Yes, it is safer to live by the rules our fathers and mothers laid down. Yes, it is wiser to wait until your body and mind are strong enough for a challenge until you drop yourself into a it. But for some people, people like Chris, to live by the rules is a slow and painful death. Chris lived the life he loved and died for it. In the process he opend a dialoge and touched the lives of many people he never met. In a small, almost imperceptable way, he changed the world. He gave us insight and caution. He taught us of the vaule of human life and how to live a valuable life. I am not angry at Chris. I am proud of him.
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