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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen The Wreck of the Titan - 20/20 forseight
Walter Lord's book, "A Night to Remember" ends with a list of "ifs." If only they had heeded the ice warnings; If only the lookouts had been given binoculars; If only there were more lifeboats; and a long list of others. Add one more: "If only they'd paid attention to Morgan Robertson." The "Wreck of the Titan," is only one of...
Veröffentlicht am 19. März 1998 von tpobrien@wctc.net

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3.0 von 5 Sternen How could he be so psychic?
Either this guy is psychic, or these stories were not written when they are said to have been. The story of the Titanic already was so amazing, so fantastic that it is easy to imagine that it may just be a story. Everything that happened with that ship was so perfectly fitting for a disaster on its maiden voyage, so good a story, that it actually was in...
Am 6. Juli 1998 veröffentlicht


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4.0 von 5 Sternen The Wreck of the Titan - 20/20 forseight, 19. März 1998
Walter Lord's book, "A Night to Remember" ends with a list of "ifs." If only they had heeded the ice warnings; If only the lookouts had been given binoculars; If only there were more lifeboats; and a long list of others. Add one more: "If only they'd paid attention to Morgan Robertson." The "Wreck of the Titan," is only one of several short stories in the book, "The Wreck of the Titan." All of the stories deal with the sea, and through them, you can see that Mr. Roberts was very knowledgeable in all aspects of maritime science. Many of his stories deal with Annapolis, and one might assume that he was a graduate, though I have no way of knowing that for sure. Many of his stories show amazing insights - for example, in "Beyond the Spectrum" he speculates on a Pacific war between the United States and Japan, where submarines and secret weapons play an essential role. However, Robertson's main claim to fame was the title story: "The Wreck of the Titan." Robertson knew everything about the Titanic disaster, fourteen years in advance. He knew where shipbuilding was going; he knew the length, and displacement of the next generation of ships, the power of their engines, the speeds they could achieve, and all about their "safety" features - including electronic control and communications systems and the approximate number of watertight compartments. He also knew that the ships carried too few lifeboats; that they raced at unsafe speeds through dangerous waters, and that watertight compartments wouldn't save a supposedly "unsinkable" ship if it sideswiped an iceberg. He even knew when and where a disaster was most likely to happen. He had his Titan sink in the month of April, just a few miles north of the actual spot where the Titanic went down. Was he clairvoyant? Probably not. In hindsight, his dire prediction should have been obvious to anyone. He realized that the way ships were being run a disaster was inevitable. On the other hand - what about the name of his mythical ship - the "Titan." Just a lucky guess, perhaps. However, if that's true, then he guessed right twice. In his story "Pirates" he has a ship much larger than the Titan being torpedoed. Titanic buffs know that the Titanic had two sister ships, and that her younger and larger sister, the Britannic, was torpedoed in World War 1. However, "Britannic" was not the original name when the ship was first designed. White Star originally intended to call her the "Gigantic." They changed the name after the Titanic disaster because "Gigantic" sounded too much like "Titanic." So what was the name of Robertson's torpedoed super liner? The "Gigantia." And one more thing - though I admittedly take this out of context - consider the following passage from "Pirates:" "When he looked, the bow was under water, the stern rising in the air, higher and higher, until a third of the afterbody was exposed; then it slid silently, but for the bursting of air bubbles, out of sight in the depths." For all his insights, however, it has to be said that Robertson not a great writer. In fact, he was mediocre at best. Perhaps that's why his warnings went unheeded. Other than certain facts that turn out to be amazingly accurate, his plots are nonsensical. Still, the stories are entertaining, and there is a certain charm about all of his writings. This charm cannot be found in the great classics, because they are timeless; it can only be found in the lesser-known works of any era. Through Robertson, an average writer, we can gain rare insights into the mind of the average person of the Victorian era. From the way Robertson writes, it must have been an age of romance and chivalry. A world practically inconceivable by today's standards. Case in point: In Pirates, escapees from a military prison steal a supposedly deserted navy Destroyer. Once out to sea, however, the pirates discover that a single naval officer had been sleeping, unnoticed in the galley as they stole the ship. So what do these cutthroats do with him after they find him? Pitch him overboard, perhaps? Not quite. That would be murder; and just because they're pirates and condemned criminals, that doesn't make them murderers. Instead, they make him promise to behave, and and once he'd given his word of honor, they give him the respect he deserves as an officer, and complete freedom of the ship. Unbelievable!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Futility almost seems to foretell the titanic disaster., 10. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Futility/the Wreck of the Titan (Taschenbuch)
Futility is a story about a huge ocean liner called the "Titan" which was the largest and most luxurious ship in the world. The Titan hits an iceberg on its starboard side and sinks in the icy North Atlantic during the month of April. I wanted to read this story because it was believed by some that this story would foretell the sinking of the Titanic 14 years later. I found parts of the book to be interesting; but I had a hard time trying to follow all of the events without rereading some of the pages. At one point, I put the book down because it became a little boring at times. Overall, Futility is a good book to read, and no doubt was a good sea adventure in 1898! I cannot really say there is any similarities to the way the "Titan" sank compared to the Titanic disaster. I gave this book 4 stars, because Morgan Robertson spoke of important nautical terms (like the Titan's 19 watertight compartments, triple screw expansion,etc). These were on ocean liners of the late 1800's and early 1900's. Futility is not the best book I have ever read, but I think it was a pretty good one. It is hard not to try to compare the events unfolding in Futility and compare it to the events leading up to the sinking of Titanic; since the two events are similiar. It is a story that any Titanic enthusiast or historian must read!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen The Truth is Strange Enough, 2. März 1998
Von 
Adaire Cain (Midvale, UT United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
It is strange that reviewers of this book so often obviously haven't read it. The World War II story as it seems to be, appears to have been written in 1912 though the list of three copyright dates in this four short-story book don't specify what date belongs to what story. There is no preface or introduction. No claims are being made no explanations offered. There are no sun bombs in Beyond the Spectrum, the afor mentioned story; just an amazing description of a lazer the Japanese use to cause a temporary blindness in American navel forces. It's as if the writer had a vision of the blinding light of an attomic blast and a lazer and thought the two were somehow related. He refers to the light emited as a radiation three or four times. A description of a WWII submarine and the persecution of American Japanese is right on. The Titan story is just as suprising, but again reviewers site some parallels that don't exist. The link that brought me here said there would be material from Dr. Ian Stevenson included. There isn't.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen How could he be so psychic?, 6. Juli 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Either this guy is psychic, or these stories were not written when they are said to have been. The story of the Titanic already was so amazing, so fantastic that it is easy to imagine that it may just be a story. Everything that happened with that ship was so perfectly fitting for a disaster on its maiden voyage, so good a story, that it actually was in "Futility". But I ask you, how could so many details be so acurately described, even the name of the ship(Titan)? It is truly amazing. And that is why I, or anyone, has reason to believe that this story possibly was not written 1896, but after the real disaster. Think about it- it is just as logical, even more so, that "Futility" was written afterwards. And I see no way to prove either way, really.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Strange coincidence..., 23. Februar 1997
Von Ein Kunde
According to [...]

English writer Morgan Robertson wrote Futility, an imaginary account of a collision between a large
trans-Atlantic oceanliner and an iceberg on her maiden voyage to New York. He called his ship the
Titan. Did he cash in on the disaster? Hardly. Robertson published his book in 1898--14 years
before the Titanic sank.
Robertson later wrote a book, Beyond the Spectrum, that described a future war fought with aircraft that carried
"sun bombs". Incredibly powerful, one bomb could destroy a city, erupting in a flash of light that blinds all who
look at it. The war begins in December, started by the Japanese with a sneak attack on Hawaii. . . .
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5.0 von 5 Sternen This book is eriee, 8. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
This book predicts the Titantic disaster 14 years before the Titanic sinks. Morgan Robertson predicts everything that will happen to the Titanic. Robertson predicts the the ship's size, how many passengers (rich and poor), how many lifeboats, which side of the ship the iceberg hits and how many people die when the ship takes its final plunge to the ocean floor. The book also predicts the inquieries which take place after the sinking.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Original version available on microfilm at many libraries., 1. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I read Futility in less that 2 hours at the U. of Washington library where the original version is available on microfilm. This fictional wreck of the Titan is remarkably similar to that of the Titanic, which occured some 14 years after the publication of Futility, but it is not the central theme of the book. But Futility is worth reading for the novelty of the coincidence of early fiction with later fact. R.N. CLARK
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2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Too many coincidences........, 11. April 1999
Von Ein Kunde
The book "Futility", if taken alone, only deserves 1 star. Morgan Robertson, a self described "visionary", was not a very good writer. His writing style was, in my opinion, a sure cure for insomnia! But on a fateful night in 1912 one of Robertson's books came true -- almost. He mispelled the name of the ship by two letters (Titan rather than Titanic) but everything else he got right: month, number of people on board, lifeboat capacity... the coincidences are astounding. If you choose Futility, be prepared for one of the worst written books you've ever read.... and chills down your spine!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Rätsel, 23. Januar 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Wreck of the Titan or, Futility (English Edition) (Kindle Edition)
Wie konnte Morgan Robertson 1898 vorausahnen, dass im Jahre 1912 ein für damalige Zeiten riesiges und angeblich unsinkbares Schiff an einem Eisberg scheitern würde? Er hat es nicht geahnt! Nichtsdestotrotz verblüffen die Ähnlichkeiten der technischen Details und des Untergangs zwischen seinem Romanschiff Titan und der späteren Titanic.
Da das Buch wohl eingescannt wurde, fehlen die sonst üblichen Inhaltsangaben, was mich etwas störte, da nach "The Wreck of the Titan" noch andere Geschichten folgten und dies ohne die Inhaltsangabe nicht ersichtlich war.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Compelling, 20. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Futility/the Wreck of the Titan (Taschenbuch)
It was sad and compelling. It was a stirring book and was gripping. I almost never put it down and cried at some parts.
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