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6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen So complex and just....so great!
We meet Dick Diver en route to Dohmler's mental clinic in Zurich, where he used to work as a psychologist and now only visits. The reader learns that Dick and Nicole - the two forthcoming main-characters of the novel - met months before. Nicole Warren, who is a patient in Dohmler's clinic has been writing letters to Dick and both somehow got very fond of eachother. For...
Veröffentlicht am 12. März 2001 von spinbn@hotmail.com

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Sporadically touching. Overall dated and disappointing
Fitzgerald wrote a perfect short novel in Gatsby. I find the more ambitious and longer Tender is the Night disappointing. It is too loose, occasionally rambling, and the overly artful language now seems dated. The storyline is simple- the progress of a marriage from infatuation to its end, and the collapse of the main character. But the book only comes to life in the...
Am 26. April 1999 veröffentlicht


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6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen So complex and just....so great!, 12. März 2001
We meet Dick Diver en route to Dohmler's mental clinic in Zurich, where he used to work as a psychologist and now only visits. The reader learns that Dick and Nicole - the two forthcoming main-characters of the novel - met months before. Nicole Warren, who is a patient in Dohmler's clinic has been writing letters to Dick and both somehow got very fond of eachother. For Dick on one hand Nicole becomes a case study, on the other he falls deeply in love with her. They marry, Nicole gives birth to a girl (Topsy), her state of mind seems to brighten up and they move to the French Riviera. The Divers in fact form the high society of Cannes, always surrounded by their friends: the McKiscos, the Norths and a few other American tourists, by whom Rosemary Speers, a rising young star from Hollywood, and her mother are introduced to Dick an Nicole. From the first moment they meet, Rosemary is completely infatuated with Dick and after some time of resisting the temptation he also falls in love with her. The Norths, the Divers and Rosemary decide to spend a few days in Paris, where Dick feels that the tension between him and Nicole is growing and finally confesses his love to Rosemary. After two people getting murdered right in front of them, the group leaves the city. The Divers go back to the Riviera with the Norths and Rosemary to Italy to shoot a new movie. Due to Dick neglecting her and to all the chaos they had to live through the past weeks, Nicole is getting very unstable again. Dick does not want to take this responsibility anymore and opens a new clinic with a friend in Lausanne. His alibi is to be better able to care for Nicole. But this is also too much for him, so that during a long break from work he travels through Europe. On his voyage he learns of Mr. North having been killed and also his father's death. He is so confused, that he decides to visit Rosemary in Naples, after not having seen her for 3 years. Their relationship now seems strangely distant, but they are still fond of eachother. Back in Cannes Dick frustrates and flees into the high-society, which lets him meet an earlier acquaintance again: the Frenchman Tommy Barban, who has always shown interest in Nicole and because of whom she later divorces Dick for. He, in fact, has anticipated all of this and when also the relationship to Rosemary turns out to be a failure he decides to be a better father for Topsy from now on and moves back to the United States to practice general medicine.
I chose to work with this book, because an excerpt of it was given to us in one of our exams. Right away I thought the book would be interesting to read, due to the different languages that are used and also due to the big drama and strange constellation of people that I could find in even such a small piece of a 500 page book. Actually those 500 pages were, what shocked me at first, but once one starts reading Tender is the Night one realizes that it is never really boring. So many different, weird people with so many problems, so many interesting relations, affairs and feelings between them, so many different places, so many emotions and such a complicated, but still easily understandable and interesting plot make the novel absolutely worth reading. Fitzgerald's style is demanding but easy to read and even with not knowing every single word, the storyline still remains clear and gripping. In the end one feels like one really knows what is happening inside the characters and why they act how they do - a fact that is sometimes missing in other novels.
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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "First the Morale Goes, then the Manners.", 15. August 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender is the Night (Taschenbuch)
Tender Is the Night is one of the most interesting examples in 20th century fiction of reversing the usual social metaphors. Dr. Dick Diver, a psychiatrist, is examined as a case of mental health. He is also placed in a classic woman's role, that of the desired, amiable beauty sought after by all and sundry. These juxtapositions of the usual social perspectives allow the reader to touch closer to the realities of human need and connection, by piercing our assumptions about what is "right and proper."

The story begins from the perspective of Rosemary Hoyt, an 18-year-old motion picture star, recuperating on the Rivera. One day she goes to the beach and becomes entranced by the Divers, Dick and Nicole, a golden couple with whom she immediately falls in love. Beautiful, young, rich, and looking for adventure, she quickly sets out to capture Dick who is the most wonderful person she has ever met.

Later, the story shifts to Dick's perspective and traces back to the beginnings of his marriage to Nicole. She had formed an accidental attachment to him (a classic psychiatric transference) while residing in a mental hospital. He returned her friendship, and found it impossible to break her heart. They married, and he played the role of at-home psychiatrist tending her schizophrenia. All went well for years, but gradually he became weary of his role. His weariness causes him to re-evaluate his views on life . . . and the psychological profile of Dr. Diver, charming bon vivant, begins.

The tale is a remarkably modern one, even if it was set in the 1920s. Fitzgerald deeply investigates the meanings of love, humanity, and connection. In so doing, he uncovers some of the strongest and most vile of human passions, and makes fundamental commentaries about the futility of fighting against human nature. The result is a particularly bleak view of life, in which the tenders may end up more injured by life than those they tend. What good is it to please everyone else, if they offend rather than please you instead?

The character portrayals of Rosemary Hoyt, Dick Diver, and Nicole Diver are remarkably finely drawn. I can remember no other book where three such interesting characters are so well developed. You will feel like each of them is an old friend by the time the novel ends.

If you have ever had the chance to read Freud, the novel will remind you of his writings. There is the same fine literary hand, the succinctness and clarity of expression, and the remorseless directness of looking straight at the unpleasant. I felt like I was reading Freud rather than Fitzgerald in many sections.

This book should open up your mind to thinking about which social conventions you observe that leave you uncomfortable . . . or which are in contradiction to your own nature. Having surfaced those misfitting parts of your life, I suggest that you consider how you could shift your observation of conventions to make them more meaningful and emotionally rewarding for you.

Be considerate because it pleases you to be, not as a ruse to obtain love!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen It hit close to home., 23. Februar 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender Is the Night (Taschenbuch)
When I critique a literary work, I often consider the same elements that any other critic may: plot, theme, diction, style, etc. However, it is a rare occurrence when someone reads a story to which he/she can absolutely relate. After all, literature is best at providing a person with a way in which to be entertained, yet learn something about him/herself. In my case, I read Tender Is The Night during a period when I was breaking up with my girlfriend. If it were not for this situation, I would not have appreciated this work, but due to my circumstances, I became especially interested. I found that I could relate to many of Dick Diver's emotions, while at the same time I realized the genius with which Fitzgerald writes this novel. I knew that a person could learn a lot about him/herself through reading since literature can act as a mirror which people can see themselves, but I never knew that reading could create such an intimate experience that would hit me so close to home. Nevertheless, this book is one of the greatest literary works that I have ever read, and I would suggest that this would be a great novel for anyone who enjoys tragic human behavior.
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4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Nice Book By Fitzgerald, 4. November 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender Is the Night (Taschenbuch)
This book was the book written right after the famous of Fitzgerald's writings, The Great Gatsby. Tender Is the Night took him six years to write and it was very close to his heart since some scholars believe that this book represented his down fall after his wife Zelda died. Also, many have stated that this is second best book, but I will say otherwise and call it his best book which he wrote.
This book will seem very boring at the beginning because the main character, Dick Drive will not appear until the end of the second chapter, and will also talk about certain "plots" or other games which are not relevant to the story. Nevertheless, the plot will start to build when Rosemary starts to fall in love with Dick and the point where the story starts to cook with gas is at the Driver's party.
Throughout the book, there are points that will leave you in suspense, and will also get you to motivate you to read more into the story to see what happens. One example is why did Dick marry Nicole. Though the story, their marriage has a facade over it, when they are around a crowd, they act with love and is flawless, yet when they are by themselves, it is a whole different world. They act very unfriendly, the couple do not really talk to each other or get into arguments. The Driver's marriage is not strong, and the weakness will lead up to chaos and the conclusion of the book.
Also, in the book many subplots will make the book even more suspenseful to read. The subplots I believe are what keep you going in this book because it will show that true life is not just one problem (like having an affair) there are many. Some include, what happened in the restroom, why is Mr. North hiding, and the overall one, how did Dick and Nicole get married. When they are first introduced into the book, they do not give the answer right away, you must read and continue reading the solution to the subplot, and then will lead you to the main one.
Finally, I really found this book to be a great one. The main characters are great, the story plot is good, but the only bad item is how it would throw me off the track when another problem arrived. The effort of the six years that Fitzgerald actually paid off, although he was not as successful with this book.
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11 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Erschreckende Selbsterkenntnis, 23. Dezember 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender is the Night (Taschenbuch)
Es ist bewegend, wie intensiv und unbarmherzig sich Francis Scott Fitzgerald in diesem Werk mit seinem eigenen Schicksal auseinandersetzt. Das Leben als "expatriate" in Europa, geprägt durch Oberflächlichkeiten und der permanenten Suche nach Vergnügen führt zu einem zwangsläufigen Realitätsverlust. Ganz extrem erlebt dieses F.S. Fitzgerald am Beispiel seiner Frau Zelda, die ab 1930 geisteskrank wird. Vier Jahre später schreibt er nun diese Geschichte, von Dick und Nicole Diver und hält seinem eigenen Leben einen Spiegel vor. "Tender is the Night" ist ein hervorragend erzähltes Werk über die Leichtigkeit des Lebens, die wir doch alle anstreben und die so vielen zum Verhängnis wird. Besonders in der heutigen Zeit des Überflusses der Erlebnisgeneration hat diese Geschichte aus den goldenen 20er Jahren einen hoch aktuellen Bezug.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Sporadically touching. Overall dated and disappointing, 26. April 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender Is the Night (Taschenbuch)
Fitzgerald wrote a perfect short novel in Gatsby. I find the more ambitious and longer Tender is the Night disappointing. It is too loose, occasionally rambling, and the overly artful language now seems dated. The storyline is simple- the progress of a marriage from infatuation to its end, and the collapse of the main character. But the book only comes to life in the final fifty pages. Unlike his contemporaries, Proust, Hemingway, Miller etc, Fitzgerald now seems antique. Instead, I would recommend Fiesta- The Sun ALso Rises, or, if the reader has a couple of years on his hands, Remembrances of Times Past. Both cover the essential theme far better.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "First the Morale Goes, then the Manners.", 15. August 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender is the Night (Taschenbuch)
Tender Is the Night is one of the most interesting examples in 20th century fiction of reversing the usual social metaphors. Dr. Dick Diver, a psychiatrist, is examined as a case of mental health. He is also placed in a classic woman's role, that of the desired, amiable beauty sought after by all and sundry. These juxtapositions of the usual social perspectives allow the reader to touch closer to the realities of human need and connection, by piercing our assumptions about what is "right and proper."

The story begins from the perspective of Rosemary Hoyt, an 18-year-old motion picture star, recuperating on the Rivera. One day she goes to the beach and becomes entranced by the Divers, Dick and Nicole, a golden couple with whom she immediately falls in love. Beautiful, young, rich, and looking for adventure, she quickly sets out to capture Dick who is the most wonderful person she has ever met.

Later, the story shifts to Dick's perspective and traces back to the beginnings of his marriage to Nicole. She had formed an accidental attachment to him (a classic psychiatric transference) while residing in a mental hospital. He returned her friendship, and found it impossible to break her heart. They married, and he played the role of at-home psychiatrist tending her schizophrenia. All went well for years, but gradually he became weary of his role. His weariness causes him to re-evaluate his views on life . . . and the psychological profile of Dr. Diver, charming bon vivant, begins.

The tale is a remarkably modern one, even if it was set in the 1920s. Fitzgerald deeply investigates the meanings of love, humanity, and connection. In so doing, he uncovers some of the strongest and most vile of human passions, and makes fundamental commentaries about the futility of fighting against human nature. The result is a particularly bleak view of life, in which the tenders may end up more injured by life than those they tend. What good is it to please everyone else, if they offend rather than please you instead?

The character portrayals of Rosemary Hoyt, Dick Diver, and Nicole Diver are remarkably finely drawn. I can remember no other book where three such interesting characters are so well developed. You will feel like each of them is an old friend by the time the novel ends.

If you have ever had the chance to read Freud, the novel will remind you of his writings. There is the same fine literary hand, the succinctness and clarity of expression, and the remorseless directness of looking straight at the unpleasant. I felt like I was reading Freud rather than Fitzgerald in many sections.

This book should open up your mind to thinking about which social conventions you observe that leave you uncomfortable . . . or which are in contradiction to your own nature. Having surfaced those misfitting parts of your life, I suggest that you consider how you could shift your observation of conventions to make them more meaningful and emotionally rewarding for you.

Be considerate because it pleases you to be, not as a ruse to obtain love!
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3.0 von 5 Sternen entertaining to read but difficult to understand, 7. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender Is the Night (Taschenbuch)
I had mixed feelings about Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I enjoyed reading about the romance between Nicole and Dick, and then between Rosemary and Dick, and I found that I cared deeply for the characters. I was involved in their lives and felt concern and sorrow for them. Despite these aspects which I enjoyed, there was much of the novel which I felt to be irrelevant and uninteresting. I didn't understand the significance of the story of Abe North's difficulty with the law, the problems between the Divers and a remarried Mary North, and the arrest of Mary North and Lady Sibly-Biers. I was also disappointed in the way Fitzgerald chose to resolve the story. Dick was my favorite character throughout the novel but it seemed in the end that he was sucked dry by Nicole, used and abandoned by Rosemary, and made an outcast by all his friends. I felt that Tender is the Night was weak in terms of historical content. There was little discussion of World War I and the novel didn't create a clear picture of its aftermath. I also had a mixed reaction with regard to Fitzgerald's style of writing. His description was interesting and creative but I was often confused as to the character speaking, the passage of time, and the exact aspects of an event. I finished the novel uncertain about whether or not events had actually occurred and not completely understanding the motivation behind much of the story. Overall I found Tender is the Night to be entertaining to read but at times difficult to understand.
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3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen This novel is more revealing about Fitzgeral than the 1920's, 29. August 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender Is the Night (Taschenbuch)
I read "Gatsby" and was awed by Fitzgerald's ability to both describe the 1920's and to draw his readers into that postwar period. His characters felt real to me. So, I couldn't wait to read Tender is the Night. "Tender" seems to reveal more about Fitzgerald personal pain than anything else. His novel elaborately blames Nicole for Dick's emotional decay. To me, this story line just doesn't bear close scrutiny. Dick's behavior is controlling,habitually deceitful and at times misogynistic. Time after time Dick control's Nicole's actions and refuses to allow her to even discuss her viewpoint. Nicole's behavior is unbalanced but is it schizophrenic?
It's very revealing that a 28 year old man would fall in love with a 16 year old girl. Later, when Nicole has grown up a bit, Dick falls in and out of love with Rosemary, a very child-like 18 year old.
Granted, women's rights were along way off in 1925 the year Fitzgerald began writing Tender is the Night, but Dick seems more in charge of Nicole's life than seems warranted by either the prevailing culture or by Nicole's illness.
I'd say that Fitzgerald unconsciously revealed his own role in his decaying marriage and like most folks tried to point the finger elsewhere.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen This novel is more revealing about Fitzgeral than the 1920's, 29. August 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tender Is the Night (Taschenbuch)
I read "Gatsby" and was awed by Fitzgerald's ability to both describe the 1920's and to draw his readers into that postwar period. His characters felt real to me. So, I couldn't wait to read Tender is the Night. "Tender" seems to reveal more about Fitzgerald personal pain than anything else. His novel elaborately blames Nicole for Dick's emotional decay. To me, this story line just doesn't bear close scrutiny. Dick's behavior is controlling,habitually deceitful and at times misogynistic. Time after time Dick control's Nicole's actions and refuses to allow her to even discuss her viewpoint. Nicole's behavior is unbalanced but is it schizophrenic?
It's very revealing that a 28 year old man would fall in love with a 16 year old girl. Later, when Nicole has grown up a bit, Dick falls in and out of love with Rosemary, a very child-like 18 year old.
Granted, women's rights were along way off in 1925 the year Fitzgerald began writing Tender is the Night, but Dick seems more in charge of Nicole's life than seems warranted by either the prevailing culture or by Nicole's illness.
I'd say that Fitzgerald unconsciously revealed his own role in his decaying marriage and like most folks tried to point the finger elsewhere.
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