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Flowers In The Attic (Dollanganger)
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 16. April 2007
Es gibt viele Kriterien, nach denen man Literatur beurteilen kann. Ein Merkmal, das alle Bestseller-Romane wie "Flowers in the Attic" kennzeichnet, ist, dass wir Leser mit den Figuren mitfiebern und leiden, uns mit ihnen freuen und trauern, wenn sie sterben.

Die Blumen des Dachbodens würden sich seit 1979 nicht millionenfach verkauft haben, wenn es ihnen nicht in besonderem Maße gelingen würde, den Leser von der ersten Seite an gefangen zu nehmen und nicht mehr loszulassen bis zum befreiten Ende. Indem die Geschichte uns gefangen nimmt und nicht mehr loslässt, spiegelt sie auf der Leserseite ihren Inhalt wider, der von vier Kindern erzählt, die von Großmutter und Mutter auf einem Dachboden eingesperrt werden. Wie die Kinder auf dem Dachboden ist der Leser gefangen in der Geschichte, kann sich von ihr nur befreien, indem er liest und liest und liest, dabei hoffend und bangend, dass die Kinder den Ausbruch schaffen und die Geschichte ein gutes Ende nimmt.

Mit der Großmutter- und der Mutterfigur, die den Kindern als Gegengewicht gegenüber gestellt werden, triggert V.C. Andrews all jene Urbilder von bösen, gemeinen und selbstsüchtigen Frauen, die in unsere Köpfe gepflanzt wurden durch die Märchen der Gebrüder Grimm u.a. Dieses Prinzip, die schrecklichen Bilder und Vorstellungen aus Kindertagen im erwachsenen Leser anzusprechen, funktioniert bei "Flowers in the Attic" ebenso gut wie etwa bei "It" von Stephen King. Das hat Andrews großartig gemacht und dieses Buch völlig zu Recht zu einem Welterfolg.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 18. September 2000
I was introduced to this spellbinding saga when I hired the film Flowers in the Attic (about 5 years ago). When I learned that there existed a book about this story, I just went to look for it and bought it. It is a shockingly true book, a pure example of greed and selfishness. When I read it for the first time I could not stop thinking that I might turn out to be a bad parent since the mother in the story was so normal in the beginning but then she changed... But to understand the whole reason of such cruelty one has to read the whole series starting with Flowers in the Attic, then Petals on the Wind, If there be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday and finally the prequel of all the series: Garden of Shadows (the start of all the deceit) When I read Garden of Shadows, dealing with the early misfortunate life of Olivia, I thought that after all she was not as bad as she turned out to be. Ill treatment from her husband and the death of her two sons made her search for something to console herself into, which unfortunately turned out to be hypocritical religious teachings by the horrible and perverse John Amos, a distant cousin of Olivia and butler of the Foxworths. Unfortunately, the creator of such vile actions (the grandfather) suffers the least whilst the mostly innocent (the children) suffer the most. After reading this book, whenever I happened to pass by a large mansion, I used to ask myself if there might be someone hidden in one of the rooms of the uppermost floor, waiting to come out... My only regret is that this story is based on a true story.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 20. Juni 2000
Boy, this book probably one of the most twisted ones that I've ever read (and believe me, considering that whacked out books are my basic genere, I've read a lot of books you could call "twisted". This one takes the cake.) It's one of those that you don't forget; that keeps you up at night months after you've finished reading it. I must admire V.C. Andrew's courage, however, on putting out such a controversial book.
When you read this, prepared to be - shocked - a lot - to say the least. When I read this, my jaw dropped to the floor so often that it finally just stayed there. I mean, in the beggining, I thought the way Cathy and Chris acted towards eachother was kind of wierd, but then, I thought "Well, I haven't got an older brother, so I'm in no position to judge them, right?" I gave them the benefit of the doubt, until it became painfully obvious that . . . something wasn't right. It's heartbreaking; the way that the Grandmother, in her own backwards style, practically shoves them into each other's arms; and how they come to depend upon each other so much. If you'd seen this scenario presented in any other way, you would have brushed Chris and Cathy off as a pair of incestious perverts. But the way V.C. Andrews makes you see it, you just . . . can't; you feel so sorry for them.
What really scared ME about this book, was that this COULD still happen; even right now as I type this. I couldn't believe the transformation of their mother's character; the way she was the perfect mother in the beginning, and then she started to slide down and down and down. . .that scared me too. I thought: What if that happens to MY mother?
You might wanna read this book, but be forewarned: if you're not prepared to be totally shocked, disgusted, hearbroken, etc. , then DON'T read it.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 16. Dezember 1999
I read this novel several years ago-when I was about 15 or 16-for the first time. It has remained my favorite since then. I have often thought that this story, more than any other, exemplified the dark shadows in the human heart. The story speaks volumes-if the reader can put aside their own paranoia about incest and abuse and the other things that go on in society that most people want to sweep under the rug and pretend it doesn't exist. The story speaks to the vulnerability of children, how every child is really at the mercy of their parents. What happens in childhood reverberates throughout one's life. I thought Cathy was the most painfully real heroine-all of her emotions poured out on the pages-enough to fill your eyes with tears for all she could have been and what, you knewm she would become. She is full of justifiable hate, yet racked by guilt, desperate for love, consumed with desire, but at heart a good person. The incest was disturbing, but written so well, that even the most cold-hearted reader couldn't help but pity Chris and Cathy. Circumstances forced them to make choices that they might otherwise not have made. The story is haunting, the kind of thing that keeps you thinking long after the book is finished. Wondering if the children's horror were yours, how would you have turned out?
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 14. September 1998
The first V.C. Andrews book I ever read was "Heaven". But when I read Flowers in the Attic when I was 14, I couldn't believe how enthralling it was. Every word drew me into a deep spell, that I wished the book would continue on forever! The characters of Cathy and Chris are so heroic, yet so sad. It's amazing what being shut up in an attic for four years can do. Chris and Cathy were locked up during a person's most vital years, when one is a teenager. Their incestuous relationship is not a thing to be disgusted about in a sense. They had no choice but to love eachother. Chris did not rape Cathy. She even said afterwards that she could have stopped him if she really wanted to. I was cast into such a spell by this book that I really thought that I was in that attic with them. The grandmother is a truly powerful, complex, and interesting character. I have read all of her books, except for the Orphans series which I intend to read soon. I am in love with every book she has written and am so happy to find others who share in my love. V.C. Andrews was a writer that should never be forgotten.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 30. April 2000
When I was in High School just about every one of my female classmates read FLOWERS IN THE ATTIC and its sequels. Recently I took the plunge and found out why, it's great! With its young, sexually and emotionally frustrated teen heroine held captive by a selfish, emotionally childish and manipulative mother and a stern, hateful grandmother, it is easy to see why this novel resonates so powerfully with teen readers. The horrorific themes of abuse (both phsycial and mental) and incest are handled well and the book packs a surprising emotional wallop. The writing is very uneven and immature, but whether this is a stylistic choice or simply the author's own bad writing is hard to tell. Just be forewarned, keep the sequeal (Petals on the Wind) handy, this book ends on a cliffhanger and you'll want to read the next volume ASAP!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 24. März 2003
Als ich den Anfang des Buches las, hätte ich nie gedacht, dass ich 5 Sterne vergeben würde, denn der erste Teil war etwas langatmig. Gut, ich wußte, worum es im Buch in etwa gehen wird, aber auch unter anderen Umständen hätten mich Corrines lange Reden genervt.
Im Laufe des Buches sind mir die Charaktere aber immer mehr ans Herz gewachsen und ich wollte wissen, wie es weitergeht. Die gehäuft tragischen Ereignisse und Enthüllungen am Ende waren sehr ergreifend und teilweise überraschend.
Ich fange sofort an das nächste Buch der Serie zu lesen!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 24. März 2003
Als ich den Anfang des Buches las, hätte ich nie gedacht, dass ich 5 Sterne vergeben würde, denn der erste Teil war etwas langatmig. Gut, ich wußte, worum es im Buch in etwa gehen wird, aber auch unter anderen Umständen hätten mich Corrines lange Reden genervt.
Im Laufe des Buches sind mir die Charaktere aber immer mehr ans Herz gewachsen und ich wollte wissen, wie es weitergeht. Die gehäuft tragischen Ereignisse und Enthüllungen am Ende waren sehr ergreifend und teilweise überraschend.
Ich fange sofort an das nächste Buch der Serie zu lesen!
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am 10. März 1997
As a member of the literary coterie (I am an English teacher and a librarian) I fear banishment for this review. My fears are founded in this unabashed statement: "Flowers in the Attic" is analogous to "The Diary of a Young Girl." This analogy stems from one glaring similarity: a group of people forced into hiding. I know what you're thinking: "How does one similarity, which may be incidental, make an analogy?" If you read like I do, you'll undoubtedly see the comparison between the "Diary" and "Flowers." The grandfather symbolizes WWII. Corrine promises her children that her father will die any day. The Allied nations of WWII promised a swift end to tyranny. After the grandfather's death, the children continue to suffer. Thousands of people were killed after the Axis conceded. In the grandmother, I see Hitler. True, V.C. Andrews' Hitler is a large woman rather than a short man. Still, the grandmother controls the lives of her grandchildren, her family, like Hitler controlled the lives of the Jews that once contributed so much to German society. The grandmother preached racial purity, just like her nonfictitious counterpart. Corrine, the children's mother, symbolizes Hitler's henchmen. She devises the psychotic plans to eliminate her children; plans she is able to carry out as long as the children are held captive by the war (the grandfather) and Hitler (the grandmother). Foxworth Hall symbolizes the German Empire. Of course, differences are present to make "Flowers" its own literary entity. Namely, three of the four Foxworth children (a majority) escape by train instead of a majority of a race travelling by train to meet their deaths. Still, one can not help thinking of the Holocaust while reaching "Flowers." The world is not compelled to make sure the destruction of a race never happens again, and because truth is more poignant than fiction, one is not compelled to read the remaining four books in Andrews' Dollanganger series. After all, a female protagonist who exclaims "good-golly day" repeatedly is difficult to take serously
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am 14. November 1997
Flowers in the Attic has to be my all-time favorite book, next to Gone With The Wind. The story of four children, imprisoned in a northern bedroom, waiting for their grandfather's death to set them free is heart-wrenching and very realistic. Four children, deprived of the love their mother gave them in abundance before their father's death, turn to each other for the love they desperately need to keep hope alive. Hope is yellow, like the paper flowers they place in the attic to make it more like a garden for the younger twins who are rapidly forgetting what it was like to be outside. The betrayal of their mother, the starvation, torture, beatings, and emotional devastation are easily accepted as reasons for Chris and Cathy to draw closer together, forming a family with the little twins, Cory and Carrie. Only in the context of this book could I find understanding for an incestuous relationship. But locked in that cold, dreary northern bedroom, cut off from their mother and all hope of love and affection, it is natural they would turn to each other. Humans need love, need to be touched and held. To deprive four young children in the midst of their development of these basic necessities is to destroy their ability to look outside of their own circle of love. Trust is a commodity which carries a price too high for them to pay. VC Andrews writes this story so convincingly, it leaves the reader wondering if there might not be a hint of personal experience or knowledge buried somewhere in the pages, or growing beside the "Flowers in the Attic."
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