Kundenrezensionen

309
4,0 von 5 Sternen
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
Format: Kindle EditionÄndern
Preis:11,66 €
Ihre Bewertung(Löschen)Ihre Bewertung


Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 30. Dezember 1997
I debated about reading this book for a long time. I usually don't read non-fiction, but since my preference is for murder mysteries, what better non-fiction book to read than a true crime story. Boy, am I glad I did. This book was so close to fiction that I had to remind myself frequently that is was a true story. I hope before I die that I'm able to go to Savannah and experience first hand the beauty that John Berendt wrote about so eloquently. I've always prided myself on my active imagination while I'm reading, imagining this person or that (actors, mostly)as certain characters. With this book, I could easily visualize Savannah and it's people. Before I read this book, I watched the special "Midnight in Savannah" on A&E and was "taken in " by this city. The characters are one of a kind-only Lady Chablis could have portrayed herself(?)in the movie. No other could immitate him/her!! And the voodoo woman, the woman of 6,000 songs, the Married Woman's Card Club-who could make this stuff up?!? I laughed alot and shook my head in disbelief at other times. But, when all was said and done, maybe Jim did finally pay the price for murder. After four trials, he was acquitted and dropped dead less than a year later. Go figure!!
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 31. Juli 2000
This is one bizarre town. That's the feeling I had after reading Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. John Berendt's bestseller is a portrait of a Southern city - Savannah, Georgia, that is populated by some very unique people, each with his or her own charm, and the murder and trial of one of those citizens. Berendt's writing truly takes the reader with him for this strange yet interesting tour, whether in the home of Jim Williams, the accused murderer, Minerva, the voodoo priestess, and oc course, the Lady Chablis (need I say more ?) The access that he received lets him paint detailed character studies, as well as a narrative that keeps the reader ready for more. A unique and fascinating book.
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 9. August 1999
If this book remained on the New York Times Bestseller's List for four years, then the competition must have really been abysmal. My recommendation prior to purchasing any present-day author is to first preview it at the library before you waste your money. If the characters in the book are representative of the citizens of Savannah then they should be embarrased. If they aren't, then they should be embarrassed. My recomendation to Berendt is that he needs to associate himself with people higher on the food chain. Joe Odom, "Lady" Chablis, Danny Hansford, Luther Driggers, can be found any day of the week on Jerry Springer, Montel Williams, Ricki Lake, Maury Povitch, ad nauseum. How is it that real authors, such as Melville, Hugo, Conrad, Tolstoy, and more contemporary authors such as Steinbeck, had the ability to develop charatcters of substance whose vocabularly consisted of more words than f... you? Place this at the top of the heap when people look for explanations for the dumbing of America. For contemporary reading, this book pales in comparison to Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain. Ada Monroe versus Corrine? Which would you like your daughter to emulate? If you haven't read either of these books, Ada is a women of susbstance while Corinne has hinges in her heels. This book has done exceedingly well, I suppose thanks to a herd mentality in a society where a good economy is a solid defense for a President who would fit quite nicely into this collection of derelicts, perverts and miscreants. Inside the Garden of Evil is a more appropo title. If this books captures the essence of Savannah then maybe General Sherman shouldn't have been so kind.
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 19. März 1999
Berendt has the uncanny ability to take potentially interesting characters and render them completely pedestrian. The dialogue is particularly innocuous, inartistic and obvious. Nothing of any interest happens in the entire first half of the book -- just Southerners caught in the act of being themselves. National Geographic stuff. Then, thankfully, voodoo enters the picture, and we finally have a decently interesting subject to attend to. Believe me, it is this book's sole saving grace. But it comes way too late and reenters the narrative way too infrequently. Had Berendt focused on the voodoo, he might have produced a genuinely interesting work, instead of this slumbering hulk of a book and its curious band of admirers (none of whom have obviously read a REAL Southern book, like Faulkner's "Light in August"). Want to read a good book in which a city is an important character, but isn't forced on you as one? Try Saul Bellow's love letter to Chicago, "The Actual." Shows you how it's done, John.
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 16. Dezember 1999
The book unfolds with a simple narrative of a town called Savannah. The author attempts to introduce us to the town's most eccentric folks. As the introductions drag on, one starts to wonder where the story was going on. When part 2 opens with the murder of the hot-blooded lover of a dubiously gay socialite, I figure that it is a whodunit. But it isn't. As you plod through the narratives about the court room drama (which is barely there), you realise that the author still hasn't decide who or what the focus is. When you get to the end of book, you are left wondering why you even bothered to get there in the first place.
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 1. August 2000
I live just a good 4.5 hr drive from Savannah, and can vouch for its loveliness and seductiveness. Mr. Berendt's descriptions nearly capture its otherworldliness, and I can't imagine a better companion for your Savannah vacation. "Midnight" is a book about coastal southern quirkiness, fantastic beauty, murder, passion, and alcohol. Read it, if you haven't already. It reads swiftly and makes your heart ache that you don't live in a place like that.
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
am 5. April 2000
I must preface this review by saying I just returned from a week in Savannah...I did all the tourist things...even took "The Book" tour...
I've just re-read "The Book" for the third time and find it even more compelling, charming and utterly delightful than before.
As for its detractors, maybe this is a Southern thing, as we do celebrate our more colorful characters down here...my town's character doesn't collect insects, but he rides a bicycle, sits on Main Street all day, waves at everyone and knows their children...and yes, there are people who are one step ahead of their creditors, but I don't think they have tour buses stopping at their houses for lunch and the occasional hair cut. And no one I've ever known has taken a visitor to a cemetary, no matter how pretty is was, for chicken salad sandwiches and martinis.
I don't think the Married Women's Card Club could have survived for all these years if it were located say, in Chicago or St. Paul. It takes years of strict social standards to keep such rituals as when to serve water and when to "pass the linen" alive. The Olgelthorpe Club, Savannah Yacht Club (and its cousins) are still alive and well in the South, and have not yielded to outside pressures to become politically correct.
The charm and the underbelly of Savannah is real...Berendt captured it on paper and I saw it first hand.
I've never "fallen" for a city like I did for Savannah and, had it not been for "The Book," I would have never visited.
From what I read and what I learned on my trip, Jim Williams would have reveled in the spotlight of "The Book." I'm sure he's looking down (or up, depending on your point of view) and enjoying every snapshot the tourists take of Mercer House. In fact, I could have sworn I saw him looking out of the second story window....or it could have been the sun....
Enjoy!
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
am 21. Januar 2000
This was my second reading of "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil". Initially, I read it four years ago when it first came out and thought it was a good story. With the eclipse of four years time and the opportunity to see a screen version of an adaptation of the story, I decided it to read it again as it came out in paperback.
Overall, it's clear that while I did enjoy the movie, it was an oversimplification of the book but it did capture the story's essence. However, in comparison to the actual story, the movie indeed pales. This second reading had me clearly tuned into the fact that this was actual history -- not fiction. Keeping that in mind, I was entirely captivated by what a small city or town can keep it self believing or not believing. This is a testament to the strange elements within every human being. One can easily understand how Berendt came to be captivated by Savannah during his years there as it certainly doesn't resemble the day to day world in America on the surface. Yet again, in other ways it does -- simply more brazenly, public and dramatically. I continue to love the character Chablis. Minerva was fascinating and the overall irony of what happens to the main character at the end is deep at the heart of much of what we fundamentally hold true with our Judeo-Christian society here in the United States.'When one does wrong, they pay for it in some way.' While for a while it seemed that Jim Williams believed he was immune to his due for his actions; he certainly paid a rather high price! Utterly fascinating. It's pretty hard to write an entire series on the strange encounters of Savannah at that time and I regret that from the entertainment point of view. Yet, this is real life, in a real city at one particular point in time. An Outstanding Read. An Almost Unbelievable Story!
Daniel J. Maloney
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
am 17. Dezember 1999
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt made for a wonderful read. The interesting twists and turns imbedded within almost every chapter make you want to keep turning the pages. Although Midnight reads like a novel, it is actually based on historically accurate details relating to Savannah, Georgia and it's society. This creates for an interesting genre, probably falling into the realm of historical nonfiction. The entire book is based primarily on the murder of a young man in Savannah, and his supposed killer, another gentleman prominent in Savannahian society. However, leading up to the actual murder, the author introduces a series of other Savannah natives, all of them quite interesting characters. From drag queens to lawyers, businessman to hustlers, you are able to meet individuals on both ends of the spectrum. I find it rather difficult to make a comparison between this book and another of its type, being as this is the first one of the sort that I have read. I was entirely captivated by this sort of literature and would love to get my hands of another similar piece. Berendt did a great job of writing from a technical standpoint. The setting centered the book in the heart of the South, Savannah, Georgia during the 1980's. Being born and raised in Iowa, I found the sharp contrast of lifestyles enthralling. The characters, well, WOW! As I said before, there was such a dynastic scale or personas that it created for a complete surprise every chapter when he would introduce somebody new. My favorite by leaps and bounds, however, had to be Chablis. The initial description we receive creates a vivid picture in my mind: "She was wearing a loose white cotton blouse, jeans, and white tennis sneakers. Her hair was short, and her skin was a smooth mild chocolate. Her eyes were large and expressive..." Then, a few pages later, we get another entirely different scene from the author, putting almost a disturbing picture in my mind. "Chablis suddenly burst into view, looking like raging fire in a skimpy sequined dress with jagged red, yellow, and orange flamelike fringes hanging from it. She wore huge hoop earrings and a wig of long black curls. The audience cheered as she strutted down the runway, working every nuance of the rhythm, shaking her behind like a pom-pom, whipping it from side to side." As you can see from looking at the characterization in the book, Berendt also uses great description. He uses the same intense description all throughout the book, describing everything from houses to parks to squares to people. The imagery was simply amazing. I don't believe that there was any strong symbolism or theme within this piece. The author just stuck right to the main plot of describing typical Savannah life, taking us on a journey, letting us witness people and events. I wouldn't necessarily recommend this book for everybody. Those younger than "teenager" probably would find this book a bit over their heads, as it does contain some rather adult context and material. But I still hold my stance that anybody ready to read a book that will seemingly involve them in the plot should open the cover of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt.
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
am 10. Dezember 1999
Aside from the fantastic title, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is an enjoyable, if somewhat bizarre trip to the self-isolated enclave known as Savannah, Georgia.
The author managed to discover a technique my 8th grade English teacher was fond of, that being "Don't tell me, show me!" Berendt does not overtly make judgements about any of the characters. He simply introduces you to them, coaxes you down the path of his own opinions, but still allows readers to make their own judgements. It is not entirely unlike encountering people in a social setting.
It occurred to me that out of the first 6-7 characters Berendt introduced, the person living the thing closest to a normal life was a transvestite. For instance, the self-serving, law-bending, amoral Joe Odom was, nonetheless, an irrepressibly likable character with an infectiously impish charm, a piano he plays every hour of the day and a knack for living in nice homes without the owner's knowledge.
The book's nominal story was a killing, though I found the ensuing courtroom drama somewhat long and redundant. A true slice of life, but not a very compelling one.
The dialogue was sometimes forced, but was useful in explaining the interplay between various characters. I greatly enjoyed the political wrestling and influence/prestige shoving matches going on in Savannah.
Those expecting typical legal thriller fare will be disappointed. Those expecting one-dimensional, read-'em-at-face-value characters will also be disappointed. Those who become instantly offended by the mere thought of voodoo, evil spirits or telekinesis will also find this the wrong book to read.
Anyone who enjoys character-driven narrative and a few scenic, possibly important side roads along the plotline will like this selection.
0KommentarWar diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinSenden von Feedback...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.
Missbrauch melden
     
 
Kunden, die diesen Artikel angesehen haben, haben auch angesehen

The City of Falling Angels
The City of Falling Angels von John Berendt
EUR 10,12

Man's Search for Meaning
Man's Search for Meaning von Viktor E. Frankl
EUR 7,81