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4.0 von 5 Sternen Jordan is great, but he's no Tolkien or Donaldson
I just got my computer and have subscribed to AOL. So I've only just started to find out about the customer reviews page featured in Amazon.com. I have to say that the comments are interesting and revealing of the readership. Anyway, I read ACOS over a year ago, I agree with a great many of the readers that this book was slow and tedious. The details it raised were...
Veröffentlicht am 12. Oktober 1997 von chaeuk@aol.com

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Worth the read if you've read the last 6 books
First off, I enjoy the series, and RJ has a remarkable gift with language.
However, I have a few peeves with his writing. For one, he seems to have a strange, juvenile fixation on nudity, especially breasts. Just take a highlighter and mark every reference; you'll run out of ink!
Secondly, his female characters are almost without exception ill-tempered...
Am 20. Mai 2000 veröffentlicht


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3.0 von 5 Sternen Worth the read if you've read the last 6 books, 20. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
First off, I enjoy the series, and RJ has a remarkable gift with language.
However, I have a few peeves with his writing. For one, he seems to have a strange, juvenile fixation on nudity, especially breasts. Just take a highlighter and mark every reference; you'll run out of ink!
Secondly, his female characters are almost without exception ill-tempered and man-hating. The men, on the other hand, roll over every time a woman snaps at them. Min is about the only female character who is likable. I'm not sure what experiences RJ has had in dealing with women, but apparently they were far worse than mine have been.
Jordan has a fixation on the war between the sexes which is unsettling. Use a different highlighter to mark the women-against-men passages, and you'll use up another marker.
Thirdly, this book introduces so many new characters and subplots that I don't see how anyone can keep them straight without taking notes. Too much confusion!
Despite these very irritating flaws in the book, it's still fun to read. Jordan paints such good images that his novels do come to life. The concept of the series and the way he is unravelling it are brilliant. You just have to put up with some of the author's fixations.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Jordan is great, but he's no Tolkien or Donaldson, 12. Oktober 1997
Von 
I just got my computer and have subscribed to AOL. So I've only just started to find out about the customer reviews page featured in Amazon.com. I have to say that the comments are interesting and revealing of the readership. Anyway, I read ACOS over a year ago, I agree with a great many of the readers that this book was slow and tedious. The details it raised were expected and not very innovative. However, as with any fantasy series it has to have a down period in order to settle some points. While I applaud Mr. Jordan's vast array of knowledge of world religions (by the very application of Buddhist ideology and other eastern religions the WOT series), the characters are a bit cliche and soap operaesque. Although he is trying to develop the main characters with as much complexity as he can, he falls into the trap of two dimensional characters with predictable vices and desires. Why is there such a dichotomy between the male and female characters? The trite positions they each occupy gets tedious. A point to the readers that Jordan has a truly feminist view: I don't quite agree with you. While the female characters are ostensibly strong, they frequently revert back to traits of feminine weakness. For example, Nynaeve is the portrayed as the strong-willed one, but her heart melts like cotton candy whenever she sees Lan. Her characterization is so polarized into classical tropes of strong-willed matriarch and subservient jellyfish that I don't feel for her, that is empathize with her. Someone made a comment about the characters, about how immature they are. They can lead armies, take care of the sick, yet when it comes to relationships they're like thirteen year olds who are told that someone likes them by that someone's best friend. And like early pubescent relationships, candor and dialogue are absent. This is what I mean about WOT having soap opera qualities it has a safety net of predictable relationship protocols. In fact, nothing is ever dared in the relationships. While the action of the series could be rated PG-13, the amorous relationships are on the scale of Disney. If Mr. Jordan could possibly start taking some chances with his characters, his series would have the complexity that would allow it to be compared to Tolkien or Donaldson. However, for the comments on the length of his installments and the complaints about the repeated details, they are necessary. Jordan is creating a different world, one we are not familiar with. And so the more details he relates the more vivid our picture of that world. I do hope that Rand's character will get smarter. It's okay that he might be going insane. But it's been years since he found out that he has powers, so he has to deal with it. If I am correct about the Buddhist inclinations in the WOT series, Rand has to come to grips with the idea of emptiness and compassion and suffering in order to control his sanity and his confrontation with the dark one, which won't be the LAST confrontation, mind you. As we are introduced into each book, the wheel of time keeps turning, so this confrontation is just one of the infinite confrontations that will take place....
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Dissenter, 18. Januar 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Right. The average rating & rave reviews given here for Crown of Swords is understandable considering that anyone not enamored with Robert Jordan's writing would surely have forsaken the series long ago.

Well, I'm the exception it seems. I can't stand Jordan's writing style: plastic characters who, with the possible exception of Nynaeve, haven't changed a hair since the first volume; unnatural dialogue; and completely unnecessary and overly-long descriptions of people, things, or scenery which have absolutely no bearing on the advancement or enhancement of the plot, but only serve to plump what could otherwise be a 400 page book. Let's face it, the action (and I'm not just talking about sword & sorcery scenes), is getting a bit thin as Jordan tries to come up with so much filler to stall the Final Battle that must eventually take place in the Final Volume. I can understand his wanting to stretch this out as long as possible to sell as many volumes as possible, but if he's just going to "recycle the plot" (to paraphrase another reviewer), then I think it's time to put this baby to bed.

Okay, that's my beef. On the other hand, I have to admit that Jordan has come up with some very good ideas, and has woven a rich and believably complex world. I can at least admire his work & effort to this point, even if I don't much approve of the execution. And for this genre, he has accomplished what few other writers could even conceive. Still, he ain't no Tolkein.

Yes, I am still reading the series, 7 volumes later, despite my pan of his writing ability. I don't recommend this book to people who believe in the traditional character development, realistic dialogue, conflict resolution, the end-of-a-book-is-the-end-of-a-book devices. I will recommend this book (& this series) for those who want to become immersed, without care or purpose (or thought), in a richly populated & complex fantasy world.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Me like Good Book by wordy wordy Jordan man., 13. September 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Along with The Shadow Rising and The Eye of the World, this is one of the best three books of the Jordan series so far. The Eye was a great farm-boy-becomes-hero story, though fast paced compared to the rest of the series. In The Shadow Rising, the intensity comes from the three main characters, Rand, Mat, and Perrin all coming into their powers. Rand learns of his past and the legacy of the Aiel, Mat aquires gifts and pays a price in attempting to take control of his life, and Perrin returns to defend his homeland in a great romantic and heroic storyline. A Crown of Swords is less focused on the big three, but here Jordan shows how much can happen in a very short amount of time (Just a couple weeks, I think). The encounter with the Gholam, a minion of the Dark One that is perhaps more dangerous than even a forsaken, is one of the most exciting scenes in the series. A new and very large group of women chanellers is discovered, though what their future role will be is uncertain. The Seanchan return to show that they have a role yet to play in the series. Some characters, such as Nynaeve, make huge strides, accomplishing things that have been hinted at since the first book. As can be expected from an epic series, many things are left unresolved. But, the best part of this book is the darkness of its ending. Mat's unterminable luck finally runs out, and Rand takes on another one of the forsaken, but the insanity induced by the taint starts to subtley show itself, as Rand begins to enjoy his own power.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen About a week of story spread across 800 pages, 16. September 1997
Von Ein Kunde
I've read every book in the Wheel of Time series, and the imagination is finally running out in "Crown of Swords". Very little happens in this book, which merely extends (never resolving) his story lines and culminates in the predictable climactic battle whose ending is never final. The book also stretches events out to extremes. Conversations take pages to resolve, every shuffle of paper, every raspy sounding breath, is described in great detail. Having followed up this book by reading Tad Williams' great "Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn" series, and George Martin's "Game of Thrones", I am wondering why I would ever return to a Book Eight of "A Wheel of Time". There are simply far more entertaining and smart fantasy books out there. I hope Mr. Jordan feels the ponderous weight of what he has created, and I pray his next (and last?) book in the series quickly moves his story toward the exciting and passionate conclusion that a series of this size, and its readers, deserve.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen did anything happen in this book?, 24. Juli 2000
Von 
Ritesh Laud (Houston, TX USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
After finishing this book, I wondered how Jordan managed to pack 100-150 pages of plot into 600 pages of text! What happened to the other 500 pages?
Well, most of that 500 pages, unfortunately, was pointless discussion about things that simply don't matter, like why Nynaeve is starting to dress more revealingly (I guess to make Lan happy, but who cares?). Why does it take the entire book for Elaine and Nynaeve to find the Bowl of the Winds, when they were in the same area the whole time?
The conversations that DO matter are written in Jordan's usual suspenseful style that keeps the reader guessing as to the intentions of the speakers (Forsaken, Aes Sedai, etc.). Very few loose ends are tied in this novel and in fact, many more are brought up. The ultra-powerful and mysterious Moridin is introduced, as is the True Power which even the Forsaken don't dare to wield. What is the relationship between Moridin and Shaidar Haran, who was introduced in Lord of Chaos? What about Slayer, what happened to him? What happened to Mat? Still no word on Moiraine and Lanfear.
Yet for all the disappointments, it's a must read because it DOES progress the story. You can't really skip it because several important new characters are introduced (Moridin, Cadsuane, etc.). If you're hooked on the series, buy it but be prepared for disappoint relative to the previous books.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Why, Why everything over and over again, 8. September 2000
Well I have to admit I'am hooked to the series! But why is so much bookspace occupied by telling old facts? Robert Jordan should assume that nobody will start to read "The Wheel of time" series with this book, so why do >I have to be told over and over again what happened in the first six books. The plot in this book developes extremely slow to a rather forseeable end. I hope the series will eventually end because I'am ready for the last battle. One more point from me is that I wonder about Robert Jordans perception of relationships between man and woman which he describes in such an unrealistic way. In my experience woman are not always mocking about man and the other way around, there is the possibilitie of a normal and civilized contact between the two genders. So I give three stars to this book and four to the series so far. Besides Amazon must love him and pray everyday that the series never ends and we wheel of time junkies by the books for the rest of our lives.
Good thinking Robert!!!
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3.0 von 5 Sternen The bounce is lacking!, 19. April 2000
Von 
David Rasquinha (Arlington, VA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
A Crown of Swords (ACOS) marks the series starting to flounder. On the positive side, Jordan's story-telling skill shines through in many places like for instance the cour'souvra episodes. Also my favorite character Min at last comes into her own and more than proves her worth. Tyelin's pursuit of Mat is hilarious. Egwene's struggle to assert herself with the Aes Sedai is excellent. At long last comes the decisive battle with Sammael, long in the planning, and the choice of Shaddar Logoth as the fateful venue is inspired. But the negatives are starting to pile up as well. The juvenile wrangling of Elayne and Nynaeve is tiresome and just not in keeping with their characters as Wisdom and Heir respectively. Morgase, who has been Queen of a realm behaves in equal immature fashion. RJ does not seem to have a very good opinion of women. His suggestion that Nynaeve, post-marriage, is more sensible when Lan is around is almost insultingly sexist as if to suggest she just needed a strong husband to settler her temper down. RJ is also leaving large gaps. He just informs the reader, almost offhand, of their marriage, performed by the sea folk. Considering the interest in this denouement, it is amazing that he does not tell us more about the marriage itself. Instead, he increases the complications in this already complex plot. In addition to two reincarnated Forsaken, we now have a new Nae'blis pretender called Moridin (who is he? Where did he drop from? No answer). As if to balance the sides, RJ brings in a legendary Aes Sedai, Cadsuane (how come nobody ever mentioned hide nor hair of her before this?). And the Seanchan, after disappearing in Book 2, now reappear in force in Book 7. Still a good book, but one gets the strong feeling that RJ has lost control and is himself not quite sure where it will all end.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Not bad - but let's get on with it!!, 28. Oktober 1999
Von Ein Kunde
This is the first fantasy series I have ever read, so I know not - nor care - of the endless debates about whether or not Tolkien, etc, are better than Robert Jordan. All I have to say is that The Wheel of Time series, in an of itself, is a very imaginative series, epic in proportions. Yes, on one level it is the same hackneyed plot of innocent (and mostly naive, at least intitally) good guys fighting the forces of darkness. But why is it that no matter how many times we hear this tale in its infinite variations we still come to hear and gather from it what we will? In my opinion Jordan's version of this eternal theme is better than most I have read in the various genres.

So much for the series. Now for the book itself. It would seem we have hit the midddle of the series, and as middles are apt to do, this one lags a bit. Jordan's incredible verbosity needs to be curtailed - one would think a former military officer would realize the virtues of brevity. I really do tire of reading about woman's dresses in all their minute details. Added to this, Jordan is beginning to become very repitive with certain phrases and descriptions.
Many of the female characters are beginning to get on my nerves. Nyneave, Egwene, and Elaida have grown little, their chief functions remain to torture mat and complain about men.
The ending was lame. Shadar Logoth <i> again ? </i> Please. Find some way other than balefire to kill those nasty Forsaken. And for God sake's Rand - quit being such a wimp. If Cadsuane and the other Aes Sedai get on your nerves again just still them!

I certainly hope the next books begin the thunderous climax of the series. Really, the series should have been about 5 or 6 books, and we could have done that if we eliminated verbosity, the endless battles between the sexes, the ridiculous Seanchan and Children of Light Characters, etc. All in all, though, the series is a better use of your money than most of the garbage out there. But Please, Mr. Jordan, let's get on with it and end it now.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Just keeps getting better and better: Where's the next?, 15. Oktober 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Oh, zut! I've hit the end of the series so far! Help! I am a 14-year old girl, and I drag at least one of the WoT books off to school with me every morning without fail, and read whenever my teachers allow it because once you get started, you can't put it down. All five Emond's Fielders have made giant turnarounds in every way. Rand, for instance, was a gentle, naive country boy who wouldn't harm a flea if it bit him before that fateful Winternight that changed the course of Jordan's world. Now he's the only one who can face the Shadow to save the world, and he's killing off Forsaken left and right, among other things. Other characters have popped out with surprises of their own. Lan is still Lan, but he's a little looser now. Remember Faile's nickname for him, from #3, "stone-face?" Come to think of it, she changed, too. When we met her, she was a rough, tough Hunter for the Horn, and now she's a fan-holding lady. Some things never change, though. Berelain is still "...a Mayener strumpet...with a neckline cut halfway to her knees..." The remaining Forsaken are still more contemptuous of Rand than not, but I think they're starting to sweat. The Aiel are really cool. They have a great sense of humor, and they use it. Heck, they use it when they're not trying to be funny. Aviendha going to Salidar for any reason was a jerk-around shock. I'm glad Nynaeve and Lan got married. He was asking for it when he tried to push her away! Now let's just get the matter of his bond settled... I think I see what will happen with both Elaida's and Nicola's Foretellings. But RJ weaves as RJ wills, when RJ wills! Anyone who likes a good fantasy series should love WoT.
-Master of the lightings, rider of the storm, wearer of a crown of swords, spinner-out of fate, who thinks he turns the Wheel of Time may learn the truth too late.
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