Kundenrezensionen


38 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (5)
4 Sterne:
 (8)
3 Sterne:
 (8)
2 Sterne:
 (7)
1 Sterne:
 (10)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


4.0 von 5 Sternen whats wrong with speculations backed with facts?
Although i am only sixteen, which often seems the main excuse to discount my opinions and feelings as incessant babble, i have pretty well fortified stockpile of scientific and mathematical knowledge. I have tested all of Mr. Grahams theories refering to mathematical constants that occur in Egypt and in Cydonia ( pi, phi, the e/pi and e/phi ratios,and the tetrahedral...
Am 1. Januar 1999 veröffentlicht

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen Important, but not up to previous standards.
Graham Hancock's foray into "The Mars Mystery" suggests a disjointedness that is not in character with his usual form. It is definitely not of the same high quality of "Fingerprints of the Gods"; however it does contain the elements of a good story if told with less speculation and more supporting evidence. There is little question that The Face and the Pyramids of...
Am 29. August 1998 veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 4 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

3.0 von 5 Sternen Important, but not up to previous standards., 29. August 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Graham Hancock's foray into "The Mars Mystery" suggests a disjointedness that is not in character with his usual form. It is definitely not of the same high quality of "Fingerprints of the Gods"; however it does contain the elements of a good story if told with less speculation and more supporting evidence. There is little question that The Face and the Pyramids of the Cydonian plain on Mars make for an intriguing mystery which will likely only be resolved with extensive exploration of Mars. Is this arrangement a natural fluke or an engineered set of structures put there by an ancient race of intelligent beings, beings which may have had a link to Earth? Hancock only serves to heighten the frustration previously generated by Richard Hoagland in "The Monuments of Mars". This frustration is not helped in any significant way by a disappointing resolution and lack of clarity in the Mars Global Surveyor and the Malin Space Science Systems Mars Orbital Camera, aided and abetted by the potentially subjective method of computer "contrast enhancement" and the suggestion of a NASA cover-up complicity. But this Cydonian part of the book does not seem to fit with the rest of it; I tend to agree with T. Peters in his review that the lack of a "walloping confirmation" from the Mars Global Surveyor forced publication of a book in heavily revised form. But what is the true story told here, what was Hancock really trying to say? That Mars was once rich in atmosphere and water and now stands in stark testimony to the vastly destructive effect of asteroid and comet impact is a reasonable thesis. That the same thing could happen to Earth is also a credible argument and the fact that the Yucatan peninsula Chicxulub crater evidences the Cretaceous -Tertiary extinction of the dinosaurs and 50% of the genera and 90% of the species of the existing life should give us pause for a realistic contemplation. Walter Alvarez in his "T. Rex and the Crater of Doom" actually tells this story better. But here Hancock launches a speculative work which requires great conjectural talent; the proposition that a single giant asteroid breakup is responsible for nearly all of the entire present topological state of Mars is indeed harrowing. True, this would have had the necessary energy to explain a host of questions. A single impactor which produced the Martian Huygens Crater at 305 degrees West and 17 degrees South would have had the necessary energy to denude the entire Martian surface of its once robust 3 bar atmosphere while thrusting up the largest volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons, within about 4 degrees of its exact geometric antipode. Surely multiple hits which created the three largest basins on Mars would boast orders of magnitude larger energy availability for ocean destruction, crustal distortion, and shield volcano excitation, although Hancock does not attempt any actual quantitative exposition, making instead an intriguing qualitative case. It follows that we earthlings should be very attentive to our potential affinity for earth crossing objects. If Hancock has achieved something of merit, it is a call for the continued exploration of Mars and a growing public emphasis upon asteroid and comet research, both compelling topics with a potentially profound impact on our past...and our future.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3.0 von 5 Sternen ignore the sphinx on the cover..., 7. Juli 1998
Graham Hancock's newest book, which I had eagerly anticipated since reading (and re-reading) both of his previous books on (supposedly) similar topics (Fingerprints of the Gods, Message of the Sphinx), was somewhat of a disappointment. His two previous works in this area, although heavily "discredited" on the web, here and elsewhere, as reaching too far, I found to be the most well researched and "hmmmm..."-oriented on the subject of a civliization pre-dating currently accepted theories (which is the extent all conventionally accepted "truths" of the history of the human race are, as there is no soild proof, only compelling eveidence, which Hancock presents...) as to the origin of ancient structures on our planet, the time frame of their creation and of the culture of the creators/builders, itself a topic hardly even considered by most "experts" (i.e. professors, archaeologists, historians, etc..this is dealt with in "Fingerprints" extensively). One thing I always liked about Hancock was his un-reliance on "aliens"; he tried to fit in the pieces of the puzzle with a new perspective of the evidence at hand, "right" or "wrong", the same evidence used by the "experts", interpreted through a new filter. Yet with "his" new book (a look at the authorship in the author's note shows that his research assistant wrote many of the chapters) seems less involved with a connection between Earth and Mars as far as ancient civilizations than you would expect...it deals more with the possibility that Mars had been ravaged by comet or asteriod collisions in its history, and that Earth may have suffered and may soon see a re-occurring threat of this type of disaster. This in itself is an interesting and intruiging possibility, well documented and handled by Hancock et. al., but the "secret" connection doesn't hold up. For those of you who have read his previous works, trust me there is the the slightest, alth! ough interesting, connection between ancient structures and civilizations and Mars in this book, but it is definitely not the book I had expected from Mr. Hancock. A far more interesting work in this area is "The Monuments of Mars" by Richard Hoagland. In fact it seems from postings and websites (for what they are worth) that Mr. Hancock was asked to write this book, and put what he had been working on hold, by his publishers due to the recent interest in the "life on Mars" news stories. At any rate, although still an interesting and informative read (as usual), "Mars Mystery" didn't live up to the standard the author himself set with his previous works, although far beyond most books in this area. Anyone who is new to Hancock should definitely start with "Fingerprints of the Gods", and those of you familiar with his work, keep a grain of salt nearby....
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2.0 von 5 Sternen A disappointing and surprisingly disjointed book., 10. Juli 1998
Mr. Hancock's previous works have been well researched and notably well written. It was therfore a surprise and a disappointment to work my way through The Mars Mystery.
This is really a book in two parts. The first chapters are a rather good summary of the debate about the Cydonian features. The notable players are referenced in a fair summation of the controversy to date. If you haven't read Hoagland or DiPietro's work, you'll find this fascinating.
Apparently this was written in anticipation of a walloping confirmation from the Mars Global Surveyor. Both time and circumstances then conspired against Gordon. NO BIG NEWS.
He must have waited for new photos and confirmation. None came. As the publication date pushed back weeks, then months, the pressure to print must have been serious. It is here that the book diverges.
In search of a salable finish, Gordon takes off on the more current(marketable?)issue of comets. They distroyed Mars, they could distroy us. This is the secret connection between Earth and the Red Planet? This is an interesting, but clearly tangential topic from Cydonia. But then the seasonal movies are Deep Impact and Armageddon.
Sadly, the chapters authored by Gordon on this topic are the most fragmented in the book. The serial structure is redundent and uneven. He's working on this piecemeal and it shows.
In all, the first book(on Cydonia) failed for lack of closure. The second (on THE COMET THREAT) is desperation.
Gordon Handcock is too good a writer and researcher to blow up on deadline.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2.0 von 5 Sternen A Tenuous Theory That Goes Everywhere But To Its Point, 28. Dezember 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Graham Hancock has written several interesting books. In "Fingerprints of the Gods" he presents a plausible theory of a prior Earth civililaztion that was lost to a world wide catastrophy but somehow managed to pass hints of its knowledge and existence. "The Sign and the Seal" presented an even better case for where the Ark of the Covenant wound up. "The Mars Mystery" is a book that is not quite sure what it is. An attempt to link pyramid like formations on Mars to Ancient Egypt is, at least as presented, stretching it to say the least. Hancock constantly sets up his case then admits he has no solid evidence and then sets up again. NASA is either part of a coverup on one page or just bungling on another page. Added to this is a discussion of possible planetary destruction from objects in space. The Mars "pyramids" are left behind (never to be fully returned to) and a catalogue (that goes on far longer than needed) of asteroids, comets, etc. follows. The point is to warn of possible future catastrophies. The subject is valid but the argument as presented is meandering, repeatative and in need of a good editor. Mr. Hancock was on firmer ground in the two prior books mentioned above. In "The Mars Mystery" his prior abilitity to think out and present his arguments in a clear and logical manner has lost out to a style more fitted for a super market tabloid.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1.0 von 5 Sternen Map of Mars Guvnor, cheap at twice the price., 20. April 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Is it just me or have most of the conclussions this book drags it's way to been holed below the waterline by the recent Mars mapping mission? perhaps I'm inhabiting a parallel universe in which major pieces of Astronomical news are given more coverage. The most recent NASA mars mission took numerous highly detailed mapping photos of the Cydonia region which have revealed the so called "Face" as an artifact of the poor resolution of the few, oblique images that previously existed.(I know,I know, some people will scream "CONSPIRACY! CONSPIRACY!" but there are some people who think the earth is flat too) The recent pictures also show the "Pyramids" to have moved downwind, changed shape and passed over the top of more solid geographical features. Remarkable! The Martians must have been advanced indeed if they could make pyramids that behaved just like sand-dunes. Perhaps now Graham can go back to bothering reputable archeologists with theories about ancient ruins all around the world being based on the remnants of Atlantis, instead of wild speculations about little green men (did you spot the irony there, normally I wouldn't mention it but some people don't seem to be able to recognise it) This book was pedestrian and ridiculous when it was written, now it is outdated, pedestrian and ridiculous.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen whats wrong with speculations backed with facts?, 1. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Although i am only sixteen, which often seems the main excuse to discount my opinions and feelings as incessant babble, i have pretty well fortified stockpile of scientific and mathematical knowledge. I have tested all of Mr. Grahams theories refering to mathematical constants that occur in Egypt and in Cydonia ( pi, phi, the e/pi and e/phi ratios,and the tetrahedral constant) and found the connections uncanny to the last. Also with my previously acquired information and observed analysis of the area using fractal analysis, the features in that reagon do appear to be artificial. Human kind has a tendency to discount ideas they cannot comprehend only to find their truth when its too late, and this ignorance itself is quite disheartening. It is odd to me how some can sit and mock these theories and then go and read their Bible and beleive in a God that by no means shows proof of its exsistance. This also applies to those who beleive in the ever growing popularity of the theory of evolution, to which there is no difinitive proof. I almost pity those who doubt and critisize Graham, for it is they who will be laughed at during Grahams posthumous popularity when landers due prove artificiality on the mars structures.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1.0 von 5 Sternen Pathetic, 10. November 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I accidently bought this ridiculous book because the description on the cover was completely misleading and claimed to be about the realistic possibilities of past or present microbial life on Mars, and its possible connection with life on Earth. I took it home to discover that it is a book about Cydonia, the region on Mars that some nuts and idiots for some reason believe is an ancient alien city. I really should have called the bookstore and complained, because this book belongs in the sci-fi or paranormal sections, not the science section where I found it. Graham Hancock is a nut, and even after the Mars Global Surveyor photos of the "Face on Mars" showed clearly that it is just a regular old hill, this lunatic still thinks that it was built by little green men. The so-called "pyramids" in the region near the "face" don't even look like pyramids at all, even in the photos in the book that have been altered by other nuts like Hancock to make them look more like pyramids! When will all these nuts accept that there are no alien civilizations on Mars, and never have been? If there is any life on Mars, it is microbial, and it sure as hell didn't build any face or pyramids.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Great complement and update on Fingerprints Of The Gods!, 18. Februar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Another great book by Hancock that sheds light on the age old architectural mysteries on earth and possible connections to Mars. This book provides great update on Monuments On Mars by Richard Hoagland and may be a link to the Sitchin's 12th planet theory based on the Sumerian tablets translations. Is it possible that the huge decaying astroid talked about in this book is the same Sumerian 12th planet? Scientists believe that this huge astroid's orbit brings it into the inner solar system every serveral thousand years which the bombardment of the planets by its smaller fragments cause catasrophies such as the one that turned Mars into a dead planet with the huge scar known as the line of dichatomy in Mars equatorial region.It is interesting to see that a government organizatin such as NASA funded by taxpayers money goes out of its way not to photograph these regions with high-resolution camera's aboard the Mars Global Surveyor to resolve the controversies surrounding Cydonia. This book is a great book. My only problem was that in the second part it was getting into too much esoteric subjects of astronomy that are hard for laymen to follow.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen This work by Mr. Hancock expounds on the Martian mysteries., 16. Juni 1998
Von Ein Kunde
With much attention to detail, Graham Hancock brings to the forefront a number of intriguing mysteries surrounding the planet Mars. The research used to develop his arguments for intelligent design of Martian artifacts is based on the scholarship of many prominent scientists; a sure sign that credible evidence is being sought and applied. Mr. Hancock takes the reader on a journey which fascinates the mind; being careful to point out the facts, at times even offering the contrary opinion so that his audience can reach an objective conclusion. This style is refreshing, given the extremist attitudes that perpetually separate "new science" from "tradtional science". The only criticism I offer, (and it's constructive!) is that better explanation be given concerning mathematical concepts. For example, how many of us really understand "tetrahedral geometry?" While I realize it is difficult to make math professors out of the layman, I believe that more illustrations, charts, graphs, etc. could have accompanied and clarified the text.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3.0 von 5 Sternen Not Mr. Hancock's best work, but still an important book., 7. August 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I am a hugh fan of Graham Hancock and have read 3 of his previous books, "The Sign and the Seal", "Fingerprints of the Gods" and "Message of the Sphinx"......this was by far the weakest of them. It seems that Mr. Hancock is treading on ground that he is not as familiar with. Indeed, after reading Hoagland's "Monuments of Mars", this books seems weak. But none the less, he adds valuable material to the subject of an ancient connection between ancient ruins on Earth and anomilies on Mars. What I found most interesting was the section on asteroids and comets. This was tangential to the basic theme of the book, but it made me think. This needs more scholarly study. Graham Hancock knows that current Archaeology, Anthropology, and Ancient History has "missed the boat" in many areas. He proposes a key to unlock many of these mysteries. This book adds to that key. I hope his next book is better written.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 4 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen