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5.0 von 5 Sternen Amazing Story
I am rereading the series for the umpteenth time, in anticipation of reading "The Path of Daggers." I just finished TFOH. It seems each book in the series is better than its predecessor. Unlike Knight Michaels, who writes nearby, I found a lot of character growth in the book. And, I don't see what he means by his comment about "...murdering...
Am 23. August 1998 veröffentlicht

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2.0 von 5 Sternen Some Wandering Thoughts
Well, I made it through book five. I started the Wheel of Time series over a year ago and with each successive book it takes me longer and longer to finish. Like an all-you-can-eat buffet, I started out fast and now (with three books left) I'm more than full. Oh, I'll make it through books six, seven, and eight, but I'm reading (or eating) to fulfil a mission rather...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Juli 2000 von Hapworth


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2.0 von 5 Sternen Some Wandering Thoughts, 13. Juli 2000
Well, I made it through book five. I started the Wheel of Time series over a year ago and with each successive book it takes me longer and longer to finish. Like an all-you-can-eat buffet, I started out fast and now (with three books left) I'm more than full. Oh, I'll make it through books six, seven, and eight, but I'm reading (or eating) to fulfil a mission rather than out of hunger.
That said, I won't comment much on the book itself (I've also written amazon reviews for the previous novels). The same usual stuff happens. Elayne and Nynaeve bicker like adolescents. Egwene and Rand bicker like adolescents. Mat chases women. Trollocs attack at will. There's a big final confrontation (gosh, I hope I'm not spoiling things) at the end. Jordan's juvenile obsession with female nudity and sexuality continues. In short, it's the same old, same old.
Rather, I feel like spewing out some thoughts on why this series has received so much attention. Why are there so many readers who can't make it through the first ten pages of The Lord of the Rings (yep, it's true, read through the Amazon comments to see how many readers place Jordan above Toliken) but who CAN make it through EIGHT books and nearly 7,000 pages of this series?
Fantasy is an ancient genre. There are elements of fantasy in the Bible, in Greek Mythology. In fact, it is impossible to date just how far back fantasy goes. Our more typical conception of fantasy (dragons, battles, elves, fairies, etc.) show up in Beowulf, the epic poem, The Faerie Queen, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Most recently, of course, in the 20th century, J.R.R. Tolkien (who, by the way, translated Gawain), Ursula LeGuin, and John Gardner (in his novel Grendel) have carried on the tradition. Sadly, though, this sense of tradition is what is missing from the Wheel of Time series. I really don't believe that Jordan is well aware of the broader tradition that he's writing in.
So what tradition IS Jordan writing in? I may be going out on a precarious limb here, but Jordan's novels seem to stem from the more modern, attention-deficit disordered, quasi-Advanced Dungeons and Dragons/Role Play-gaming tradition. The Wheel of Time is a like a PC RPG put in words. There's a loosely structured main theme (Rand must defeat the Dark One) and inbetween there's a bunch of side missions and marching to and fro (the equivalent of roaming around gathering experience points). Along the way certain characters, with this accumulation of experience, recieve added skills (the ability to channel or channel with newly learned powers (healing, calling wind, etc.), the ability to dreamwalk, the ability to plan battles (Mat), the ability to communicate with animals (Perrin)). Likewise, characters pick up useful items along the way (Mat's medallion and spear, Elayne's Terangreal, Rand's Terangreal). And like in RPG's, after accumulating enough experience, they're finally strong enough to defeat a decent enemy (Asmodean, Rahvin, Moghedian etc.). And what happens after this enemy is defeated? Well, the characters go back to wandering back and forth throughout the countryside, gaining more experience points so they can do battle with the next strong enemy. Eventually, of course, these characters will be strong enough to encounter that final enemy, The Dark One, and then, well, Game Over!
My problem is this: slowly going up levels and gaining experience points may be a lot of fun on a computer screen but it makes for BORING reading. Thus, I'll wrap up my long, long review with the following: there's something wrong when today's readers shun traditional, talented writers such as J.R.R. Tolkien and Ursula LeGuin (who, in addition to being a sci-fi/fantasy writer, is also a published poet and writer of literary fiction) and turn to the thin, convoluted plots of writers like Jordan. Readers who claim that Jordan is the greatest fantasy writer of all time simply don't appreciate strong, capable writing and manageable plots; instead, many of today's readers (when they can tear themselves away from Baldur's Gate or Everquest) cast the quality of the story and the quality of the writing aside in lieu of countless numbers of battles, myriad subplots and mindless wanderings back and forth across that silly Wheel of Time Map. When will the Wheel of Time series eventually end? I honestly don't know, but it seems Rand, Mat, Perrin, Elayne, Egwene, and Nynaeve still have thousands more pages of experience points to acquire!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Amazing Story, 23. August 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I am rereading the series for the umpteenth time, in anticipation of reading "The Path of Daggers." I just finished TFOH. It seems each book in the series is better than its predecessor. Unlike Knight Michaels, who writes nearby, I found a lot of character growth in the book. And, I don't see what he means by his comment about "...murdering characters...." Rand emerges as a complex person. He seems somehow to fully understand that almost everybody wants to kill him or to use him for their own purposes, whether or not it helps the cause. He's the only one who has a holistic view about the nature of the conflict. He hardens himself like iron, using and commanding whole nations against his own nature. And yet, three pretty girls can put him through agonies of uncertainty and self-doubting.
Prior to this book, we knew little about Elayne. Sure, she's a spoiled brat. She's also delightfully spunky and adventurous, and she too is learning how to deal with smart, energetic people like Thom Merrilin in a way that will help her become a ruler. Nynaeve has a ton of conflicts gnawing at her - her relationship with Lan, her feelings about Aes Sedai and Moiraine, being challenged by Egwene, etc. The stable, quiet world in which she lived for 25 years has been replaced by a maelstrom of currents, and she's having a hard time coping. But, she's tough as nails and fierce as a tigress, and she's a heavyweight with the One Power. The scenes with her and Moghedien in the Royal Palace are absolutely riveting.
Mat continues his march to becoming my own favorite character. He would take the easy way out in every situation, but The Wheel won't let him. He is a reluctant hero at best. We see his powers growing in stages, and at each stage he surprises with his capability. Rand sees it too, and tests it and exploits it as he can. The scenes in the battle with the Shaido are gripping.
As far as the general relations between men and women - hey, that's pretty much on target. That's why that other book about Mars and Venus was an all-time best seller. Let me introduce you to my half-dozen sisters-in-law sometime. They make Aes Sedai look like Brownies.
Anyway, by the time this book is ended, all sorts of momentous and exciting things have happened. It's a delightful, exciting building block in this epic series. Finally, keep in mind two things. First, only about two years have passed since Rand and gang, who except for Nynaeve were all teenagers, were routed out of the Two Rivers at the start of the series. The character changes they show seem reasonable to me. Second, those who suppose that Jordan is dragging this out to extort more money out of us: think a minute. Think about placing yourself behind a typewriter 8 to 12 hours a day, day in and day out, for YEARS on end. Think about devoting your life to pleasing all sorts of unappreciative people - for however long it takes to finish the stories. I'll be happy to pay $25 or whatever pittance he asks each year or two for as long as it takes to resolve this great story.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen IMHO, 12. Februar 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Temporarily out of reading material, I happened to pick up two books, the first in Robert Jordan`s Wheel of Time series, and George R. R. Martin's 'Game of Thrones'. I read the Jordan book first and was very disappointed, especially knowing that I was going to attempt to read the entire series. But, I looked at all the books that he had put out and figured with all that writing he HAD to have gotten better with practice. Then I read 'Game of Thrones'. My god, read that book. It is amazing. Anyway, back to WOT. Having just finished volume five I feel I have to comment. Who are all these people giving these books 9's and 10's? I dont care about the length of the series or the books themselves, as long as the story MOVES. The story drags, even though there are some nice scenes hidden here and there. The characters remain one-dimensional, the soap-opera tendencies are overblown, and Jordan has a SERIOUS case of David Eddings disease (his cutsey men vs. women arguments). And judging by the comments of others, I am not the only one finding this three women sharing Rand a bit disturbing. Is there any real suspense in this series? I dont think so. Is Rand REALLY going to go mad? No. Is anyone we care about going to die? No. Is the Dark Lord going to win in the end? No. Has this series broken any new ground in any way? No. Looking ahead, even fans are moaning about the next two volumes of the series, not a good sign when I am not exactly enthralled already. My recommendation: if you haven't started this series, don't. Read Tolkien, read Donaldson, read Martin, hell even read Eddings first series. Stay away. All who enter are damned.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen The best of the series; it's all downhill after this, 31. März 2000
Von 
David Rasquinha (Arlington, VA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
The Wheel of Time turns and brings Volume 5 of the saga. The Fires of Heaven (TFOH) is IMHO the peak of the Wheel saga; it's all downhill thereafter. But TFOH is well worth reading. The politics of the White Tower muddy the waters, even as Rand's efforts to rally all the People of the Dragon gather momentum. The essence of the Aiel, the various warrior societies and their mission in the series become more clear with every revelation of their way of life and the fascinating honor code concept of Ji'e'toh. Egwene's apprenticeship among the Aiel and Aviendha's task of teaching Rand serve as windows for us to try and grasp the Aiel way of life. The battle scenes in TFOH are easily the best of the lot so far. Sadly, it's the same battle scenes that indicate RJ is following the bad trend of many authors and leaving huge blanks for the reader to fill in; is it because of laziness? See the description of the desperate battle between the Shaido and Rand's forces, with Mat battling for all he is worth even as Couladin himself comes against Mat's position. What happens? We only get a third party anecdote, several pages later, telling of the outcome, not a blow by blow account. Is this a new literary device? For a reader, such disjointed narratives are very annoying. Padan Fain appears and disappears yet again in yet another avatar and I for one do not understand where exactly he fits into the saga; sometimes I wonder if RJ himself is very clear about this aspect. The rousing climax is superb; unfortunately it is preceded by the interminable description of Elayne and Nynaeve's odyssey. Starting with dubious premises, this odyssey seems to have become self-sustaining with every possible logical ending becoming a new excuse for the tour to continue. The endless dissension between them also becomes stale and tiresome; after the way RJ has developed their characters in the previous books, this sudden descent into juvenile snappishness is paradoxical. Worse, RJ stretches the point to breaking. Where was the editor of this book? I still give the book 4 stars because of its clear strengths. I will not give RJ a 5 however till he comes up with better cartography.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Amazing story, 25. August 1998
Von Ein Kunde
The Fires of Heaven is an amazing story. I've just read it for the umpteenth time, and I found it as engaging as ever before. Unlike Knight Michaels, who writes nearby, I do not see characters being "murdered," whether by sexual stereotyping or anything else. The main protagonist, Rand, shows an incredible growth in strength in response to the position he finds himself in. He seems to understand full well how everybody else has ulterior motives or hidden agendas where he is concerned. He alone seems to have an holistic view of the struggle, and he steels himself to do, or cause to be done, that which will give the best chance of success. If he seems arrogant or "full of himself," - well that's sometimes what it takes to be a leader. Yet having to be that way is hurtful to him. He is after all, just 20 years old, and most of the world wants to use him or to kill him. That's a load for anybody. And, it's humorous to see the effect that three young women can have on the poise and concentration of our young Dragon.
We see Elayne a lot more in this book. Sure, she's a spoiled brat. And, she's also delightfully spunky and adventurous. She has been growing on me, and she wins my heart in the scenes around Birgitte's reappearance in this world, and in particular by her dealings with Thom and Juilin. Those guys will follow her anywhere, and that's a good start to becoming Queen of Andor.
Nynaeve - now there's a case for you. She has so many conflicts gnawing at her it's remarkable she can keep it together at all. She is several years older than the other key characters, and she was an important person in the quiet place where she has lived most of her life. She's struggling with the changes - her loss of acknowledged station, her situation with Lan, her ambivalence about Moiraine and Aes Sedai, etc. But, she's tough as nails and fierce as a tigress, and a real heavyweight with the One Power. The scenes with Moghedien, especially in the Royal Palace, are riveting.
Mat - my favorite character - just keeps on being Mat. He would always take the easy way if he could, but the Wheel won't allow it. Our unassuming hero just continues to grow. Because he is such a cynic and antiestablishmentarian, the things that befall Mat are really incongruous. As a result, stories about Mat are often side-splittingly funny. But, even though Mat doesn't confide every little thing, Rand recognizes the development of his military skills. He uses Mat's skills to the extent he can. The battle scenes around Cairhien are terrific.
As for the relations between men and women, I think Jordan has that scoped out pretty well. That's why that book about Mars and Venus was a monumental best seller. Let me introduce you sometime to my five sisters-in-law. They make ordinary Aes Sedai seem like Brownies, and they all seem to think they are the Amyrlin Seat. And, we brothers-in-law just look at one another and roll our eyes when they launch. There's nothing to be done about them.
Finally, to those of you who think Jordan is just "milking" this story for the big bucks - think a minute. Imagine yourself a very wealthy person now, who everyday has to sit down behind a typewriter and write for 8 or 12 hours. You're going to spend a large chunk of your life producing further instalments of a story instead of going off to play and spend all that money. And this even though some significant number of people will revile your efforts and accuse you of being some sort of sleaze. I am thankful Mr. Jordan has stuck with it. I'm willing to pay the pittance he asks every two years or so, just to find out about some imaginary people who seem very real and are important to me. Remember what your grandmother said: "If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all."
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Pepto-bismal please. This abysmal book is disgusting!, 21. Juli 1998
Von Ein Kunde
E[...] This is talent? Wasting hundreds of pages to describe a story that could have been done in perhaps 100-150? Introducing more character "depth" by reducing them to a primitive challenge of genders? Slaughtering likability by murdering characters who used to be so intriguing and giving them all calloused, self-centered, two-year-old mentalities?
Everyone in the Wheel of Time starts acting as if business is as usual and you get the feeling no real story is being told. Page after page, you hope that it is all to make some wonderful observation. But it never is. The Fires of Heaven ultimately cannot be saved by such amusing conundrums like *saying in a ladyish voice* Elmindreda or by shocking plot twists like deaths or Tower betrayals, it all seems so much like...a comic book.
No character growth. And there should be character growth, we should not have to buy two more books just to see extremely slight nuances hinting at very small character changes. Pl! ot begins your narrative and keeps it fresh, but ultimately only good characters will ever distinguish popular work.
Jordan's style is so rote by this time, you can almost imagine the words yourself. And why must he explain every single thought process of each character, as well all his points for readers he obviously does not consider intelligent enough to take in what little symbolism there is and make their prejudices so blatant and hellish? Why does he reduce them to one dimension by using sex, when he could have expanded them past anything else there was in this genre? Why do we never see them highly effected by what happens to them? That's just not realistic, no mattter how stubborn Emond's Fielders are. Furthermore, there is a weakening of the diversity by making all men essentially the same with little differences and all women follow the same line of thinking. The nations all have the same problems and their interesting civilizations are now rote memorizations.
A ! shame. Truly a shame, Jordan had to come to this. Where did! all the plot elements go? Jordan has completely lost control of them and his so-called imagination.
3 out of 10. Only bother with it if you must know what happens next--like a horrid soap opera--and if you can stand Aviendha and Sorilea. A few bright seconds (the ending was predictably tolerable), but not much.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Robert Jordan The power of Tolkein and Brooks in one.rated11, 6. November 1997
Von 
John Brownlee (Syracuse, KS) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Disclamer:This Review may be a spoiler. Also, if you didn't like the <i>The Lord Of The Rings</b> This is my favorite book!! The Aiel are the most impressive people in a book that I have ever known! The True Souce is the most discriptive power that has been writen. At a perfet par with <i>The PridyenCoranicals</i> by Lloyd Alexander. The Apprentace Adept is less intense, Tolkien is above, but only <i>slightly</i> Ilike the form, and the <b>length</b> of the books. If you don't enjoy an intense novel, filled to the brim with magic and enchanment, don't plunge in to R. Jordan. The loss of intrest during the middle of the book is a bad point, but the end is worth it. The multiyplicity of enemys and heros in astonding. The City of Ruinhidain was a magnifican addition to the Aiel part of the story. The Dark One has not reapperd in any of the dreams, which is a missed part. The Rand al' Thor trasition from the weekness of risitance to the Power is wonderful. Here is an exert from my Web Page The Wheel of Time:
by Robert Jordan
This is an admireable book coletion. The Wheel of time has Seven spokes, Each an Age.The previos age turns to legend. Legend becomes myth and even myth fades away before the age comes again.The Wheel is turned by <i>SADIN</i>, The male half of the true sourse and <i>SADAIR</i>,The female half. Some people can touch the true source. They are called Aes Sendi. Ever sencethe Dark One was relesed by the thirteen Aes Sendi, known asthe Forsaken, and traped by Lewis Therrin {<b>The DRAGON</b>} Their has been a taint on <i>SADIN</i>, making all male users of the One Power to go mad and use the power to destroy the earth. Rand al' Thor is the DRAGON REBORN. He was born on the slopes of Dragonmount and will onday defete the Dark One. The Forsaken are escapeing from Syoal Goul. The Dark One is attacing the barrier whith all his might. He is seaching for the items that can make his downfall. The eye of the world.The horn of Valere. The sword, Callanador. Rand al' Thor, Morine Aes Sendi, Perrin Aybarya, Matrim Carrborn, Nynaeve and Ewgene al' Vere are the stars of the first novel. The fight begins in <i>THE EYE OF THE WORLD</i>
<i>THE GREAT HUNT</i> <i>THE DRAGON REBORN</i>
<i>THE SHADOW RISING</i> <i>THE FIRES OF HEAVEN</i> <i>THE LORD OF CHAOS</i>
<i>A CROWN OF SWORDS</i> He is undoubtedly the greatest Author since Tolkein <b>John Brownlee</b>
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Wheel of Time's fifth installment...ingenius., 8. März 2000
I think this is one of Robert Jordan's better books. To all of you people who give the latter half of the series a poor review, I don't think that Robert Jordan's subtle use of detail and foreshadowing actually registers in your pitifully impotent and inadequate minds. Somebody earlier stated what dress Egwene and Elayne are wearing is inconsequential, but if you think about it you need all the detail that he puts in. in a book detail is the quinessential essence, the essence that creates a cinematic experience in ones mind and imagination. In the Fires of Heaven Robert Jordan creates one such experience in such a vivid way that leaves the reader in a lingering taboo of contemplation, hungering for more. All of this is created in such a tangible and malleable way to form the perfect picture in the reader's mind. So if a person cares not for detail, then he/she can't get anything much from this wonderful collection of extoardinary novels. The way he evolves his storyline throughout the books is amazing. In book one, the story takes place in Emond's Field, a small localized location. As the story progesses the point of veiw gradually grows larger, more grand. It grows to encompass whole regions, countries, eventually the whole continent. Overall what I am trying to say is that the use, the jordanesque flare, in The Fires Of Heaven is not unnecessarilly subtle nor brazen, but that of a perfect level to illustrate the extreme beauty and complex world of The Wheel of Time. All in all, The Fires of Heaven was most definately a great book and i can't believe anyone could think otherwise. Read it again, pay more attention to the detail which you think so poorly of. ~signed, the HMFIC
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Wheel of Time's fifth installment...ingenius., 14. März 2000
I think this is one of Robert Jordan's better books. To all of you people who give the latter half of the series a poor review, I don't think that Robert Jordan's subtle use of detail and foreshadowing actually registers in your pitifully impotent and inadequate minds. Somebody earlier stated what dress Egwene and Elayne are wearing is inconsequential, but if you think about it you need all the detail that he puts in. in a book detail is the quinessential essence, the essence that creates a"~ cinematic experience in ones mind and imagination. In the Fires of Heaven Robert Jordan creates one such experience in such a vivid way that leaves the reader in a lingering taboo of contemplation, hungering for more. All of this is created in such a tangible and malleable way to form the perfect picture in the reader's mind. So if a person cares not for detail, then he/she can't get anything much from this wonderful collection of extoardinary novels. throughout the books is amazing. In book one, the story takes place in Emond's Field, a small localized location. As the story progesses the point of veiw gradually grows larger, more grand. It grows to encompass whole regions, countries, eventually the whole continent. Overall what I am trying to say is that the use, the jordanesque flare, in The Fires Of Heaven is not unnecessarilly subtle nor brazen, but that of a perfect level to illustrate the extreme beauty and complex world of The Wheel of Time. All in all, The Fires of Heaven was most definately a great book and i can't believe anyone could think otherwise. Read it again, pay more attention to the detail which you think so poorly of. ~signed, the HMFIC
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Keeps getting better and better, 14. Juni 2000
Well I finished book 5 The Fires of Heaven and all I can say is that it is great. Rand and Aviendha's some what relationship took a step up. I wondered if something was going to happen between Rand and Aviendha (and it did). I can't what to see what happens when Elayne finds out. (personaly if I was Rand and all these women threw themself's at me I would go for it. what the hell you only live once), it looks like Min's prediction of 3 women falling in love with Rand has come true, the 3 women are Min, Elayne.and Aviendha, ( even if Aviendha hasn't admited it out loud, I could be wrong about Aviendha since I'm only on book 6 but at this point I'm sure it's Aviendha) It looks like Nynaeve and Egwene's relationship has turned around and Egwene is standing up to Nynaeve and becoming a (in my opinion) know-it-all plus she is be coming inpatient with her teachers and doesn't seem to care about the dangers as long as she learns everything. I'm glad that the Wise Ones punished her and showed her that she doesn't know as much as thinks she does. Egwene needs to learn to take directions and orders even if she doesn't like it, it is for her own good. I personaly would let her do what she wants and learn the hard way like Nynaeve did when she got lucky and beat Moghedien who was a Chosen One the first time she got cocky and thought she could bet any of them she was given a lesson the hard way then 2nd time and bearly bet her the 3rd time. Morraine looks to be dead and so does Lanfear it would not surprise me if Morraine some how comes back. ( I hope not) all in all a very good book. cheack it out you'll be glad you did.
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