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4.0 von 5 Sternen Emotional Intelligence
Anyone over the age of thirty soon comes to realize that what was taught in school is not necessarily all there is to know in life. Consequently, the smartest people, the ones who always got A's in school, don't always end up being the most successful. Ultimately, a high IQ is not the most important factor when one encounters the real world. In this respect, Goleman...
Veröffentlicht am 24. Februar 2000 von blackjewel

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Not exactly what it appears to be
There is a lot to admire here and I enjoyed returning to a genre (popular psychology) that I left many years ago. If my recollection is correct, Goleman's book is a step beyond such "classics" as I'm Okay, You're Okay..., etc., particularly in terms of scholarship. I liked the way he took the medical profession to task for its lack of empathy and its failure to...
Veröffentlicht am 15. April 2000 von Dennis Littrell


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5.0 von 5 Sternen Some truths are so self evident that we do not see them, 25. April 2000
In too many conflicts and fights the issue is not what a person said or did, but about how it was said and done. It is clear as daylight that the way we feel about issues and persons bears a direct influence on how we act towards them. This book stress the fact that if we want to live a fruitful life, we shall pay close attention to our feelings as well as to the emotions of others. Only then we will acquire the mastery required to function with ease in society. A person who is understood by others will be trusted by them, and understanding someone is not just an intellectual effort, it is also the capacity to relate oneself to the mental state of that person, i.e. its emotions. Such feast can only be done if we develop our emotional intelligence.
I guess this book will not tell you something you do not know, but it will open your eyes about the fact that your emotions are within your control, and that if you pay attention to them and their underlying forces a new dimension of possibilities appear in your life as well as in the life of those close to you, particularly, your children.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Thought provoking, 18. April 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Psychological theories come-and-go, and no one can predict if Goleman's thesis that emotional development determines success in life will hold up in the long run. However, I was surprised at how often the book inspired me to examine my own life and search for emotional explanations. More often than not, his theories brought a clarity to my actions that I didn't have before.
I wouldn't quite call this book self-help, but as a tool for introspection, it's invaluable. (It's also great fun to match Goleman's descriptions of the "emotionally inept" with loathsome co-workers and family members.)
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Why emotional intelligence wins out over basic intelligence, 3. Januar 2000
Von 
This ground-breaking book proposes that emotional intelligence is a learned ability that is as much or more important than basic intelligence and should be part of our schooling just as reading, writing and arithmetic. The author sets out new scientific evidence showing, step-by-step, how healthy emotions and destructive emotions control our lives. Feelings often count as much as logic, and we have gone too far, says Dr. Goleman, emphasizing the purely rational, when emotions are so powerful.
All emotions are an impulse to act; the creation of instant plans for handling a life situation. Now we know in detail how emotions prepare the body for differing responses. A human being is made up of two minds according to Goleman. One thinks, and one feels; two fundamentally different ways of knowing.
The author defines emotion as "a feeling and range of propensities to act." The principal emotions are: Anger: Fury, outrage, resentment. Sadness. Grief, sorrow, cheerlessness. Fear. Anxiety, apprehension, terror. Enjoyment. Happiness, joy, delight, amusement. Love: Trust, kindness, devotion, infatuation. Surprise: Shock, amazement, astonishment. Disgust: Contempt, scorn, abhorrence. Shame: Guilt, embarrassment, remorse, humiliation.
Various emotions have various physical effects on the body. Anger, for example, causes blood to flow to the hands; strong energy for vigorous action. Fear causes blood to flow to the legs making it easier to run. Happiness is a positive emotion that provides readiness and enthusiasm. Surprise makes it easier to figure out what's going on and create a plan of action. Sadness helps adjust to a significant loss and brings a drop in energy and enthusiasm.
When emotions are out of control, the emotional mind takes over and swamps the rational mind. Emotions have a mind of their own and can hold views independent of the rational mind. Goleman names five main domains of emotional intelligence: (1) Knowing one's emotion (2) Managing emotions (3) Motivating oneself (4) Recognizing emotions in others (5) Handling relationships.
A most important emotional lesson, of course, is anger management. As a culture, we have not bothered to make sure children are taught the essentials of handling anger or resolving conflict. These and other fundamentals of emotional competence have been left to chance, says Goleman.
Surprisingly, the emotional mind is far quicker than the rational mind and springs into action without considering consequences that may prove to be mistaken or misguided. Scientific findings indicate we often cannot control emotions. What's more, the emotional mind takes its beliefs to be true, discounting evidence to the contrary. That's why it's difficult to reason with someone who is emotionally upset.
A familiar husband-wife emotional story: Wives, it seems, are the emotional managers and as such, are more likely to criticize husbands. Men are more likely to be stonewallers. Wives try to bring up and resolve disagreements. Husbands, on the other hand, are reluctant to be drawn into arguments. As a wife sees her husband withdraw from a discussion. she increases the volume and intensity of her complaint white he becomes defensive or stonewalls in return. She becomes contemptful, frustrated and angry; the husband feels more and more an innocent victim. As husbands stonewall, the wife feels completely stymied. The author calls this psychological impasse "flooding~~ and points out that flooding escalates, often going out of control.
There is ample evidence of growing emotional recklessness in the wortd, the author points out, and makes a strong case that it is critical to teach emotional competence to children as part of their education.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Yes, but ...., 9. Februar 1998
Von 
P. Lozar "plozar" (Santa Fe, NM USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
I have mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, I think Goleman has made a good case for broadening our view of "intelligence" to encompass more than what is measured by an IQ test. And I strongly agree with him that we need to educate children emotionally as well as intellectually.
On the other hand, both the author and the journalists who have written about his findings have used them to support a false dichotomy: EQ is the opposite of IQ, highly intelligent people are emotional idiots, and so forth. He quotes, ad nauseam, the story of a high school student who, when his teacher gave him a B instead of the A he thought he deserved, shot the teacher. This perpetuates the stereotype that gifted children are lacking in EQ, which other studies have shown is NOT the case -- in fact, they tend to be hyper-responsible, sensitive to the feelings and wishes of others, and prone to blame themselves rather than others when things go wrong in their lives (gifted teenagers commit suicide at a higher rate than average teenagers).
Gifted children have it hard enough already: they're considered "nerds" and "freaks" by their peers, and expected to be perfect at everything by their parents and teachers; but they're not supposed to have problems (in or out of school) because, after all, they're GIFTED. Labeling them (falsely) as emotionally deficient, and asserting that there's some fundamental conflict between IQ and EQ, just makes things even harder for them.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Emotional Intelligence: Gender differences are useful, 17. Juni 1999
Emotional Intelligence, by Daniel Goleman, was a disappointment. Mr. Goleman's reporting on the physiology of emotion as well as some of the most recent research on the nature of emotional intelligence, was, simply put, outstanding. He clearly makes his case that Emotional Intelligence is a valid extension of Dr. Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligence Theory and therefor worthy of investigation.
However, what I found disturbing was the way in which Mr. Goleman utilized different emotional strategies employed by females and males as an opportunities to demean and negatively stereotype men. Beginning with his description of the gender differences for high-IQ pure types on page 44, Mr. Goleman lapses into a subtle but never ending stream of derogatory descriptions of male emotional strategies.
I found it both humorous and sad that Dian Tice, upon finding that "A large proportion of men translate (cooling down) as going for a drive", she has been "inspired" to drive more defensively. It's ironic that Psychologists and Sociologists bemoan the difficulty in securing male participants in their studies when they go to such great pains to belittle them afterward.
Is it possible, Mr. Goleman, that there are emotional gender differences, both valid and useful, that are key to the rich tapestry of humanity? Or, is Emotional Intelligence a "monolithic" intelligence in which men are doomed to languish? One wonders.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A book 2000 years overdue!, 24. Juni 1999
Von 
Charles D. Hayes (Wasilla, AK USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Daniel Goleman's book "Emotional Intelligence" shows how the undervaluation of emotion has wreaked pathological havoc on America. Divorce, depression, aggression, chronic anger, violence, ruined careers, and poor health are the evidence. When you think about it, in a "postmodern world" where "reason" seems to be in perpetual danger of drifting into chaos, it seems inevitable that the value of emotion would become a meaningful topic. The truth is, of course, that emotions have always been far more significant and consequential than the high-reasoning side of our culture has been willing to acknowledge. It is a great paradox that generations of suppressed emotions would lead to a backlash of overvaluation of the notion that emotions are something one is not responsible for--that when we're overcome by emotion, nothing can be done about it. Emotional outrage often becomes the basis of successful criminal defense strategies. On the other hand, millions of people do not realize that feelings are to life experience as a wet finger is to wind direction, and that emotion is also a veritable societal barometer. The key to emotional intelligence is equilibrium. In a postmodern world, emotional intelligence is equilibrium. Highly recommended.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Goleman's research analysis fails miserably, 28. Mai 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Daniel Goleman tries to force a large body of research on IQ and emotions to fit neatly into the theory that IQ and EQ are necessarily opposites. The evidence presented is luckily cited at the end of the book so that we can clearly see that his conclusions are wrong. It is too bad that a pretty good idea such as emotional intelligence has to be brought down a peg because Goleman combed through the available research to support his theory instead of working on a useful study of his own. The EQ idea has merit on its own and need not be considered as separate, let alone the oppostite of, IQ. The extreme cases that are cited in the book only serve to make us more skeptical of the EQ concept. Example from the book: Goleman states that "Temperment is not Destiny" and then cites as evidence tramatic childhood experiences and the fact that infants can outgrow timidity. Not the sort of evidence I would accept in order to have my child's school implement a program to "reschool my child's emotions".
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A book that could change our lives, our children, our world!, 13. Juni 1996
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Emotional Intelligence (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Goleman provides information essential for anyone with children, who teaches children, who knows children, and for those who wish to understand themselves better.
The information presented in this book clearly illustrates that intelligience goes far beyond what society has always presented in the terms of "IQ" and shows that a
realistic matter of determining what intelligience truly is depends on the ability to understand, acknowledge, and use social and emotional skills. As an educator
and psychotherapist, I feel this book is outstanding and can be used on all levels, from beginners to advanced practioners, as a guide in understanding our emotional
and social states and to provide our children with the skills required to succeed in life and perhaps change the world. What we have always considered as "intelligience"
still remains to be important, but we must know that there is much more to it and Goleman gives us a book to provide us with a starting point. It is a must read!!!!!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Being Book-Smart Does Not Translate to Success!, 2. September 1996
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Emotional Intelligence (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Being intellectually smart is surely a strong advantage in our society, but it doesn't say nearly as much as your control and awareness over your own emotions. Have you ever wondered why you have emotions, how your brain works to process them, and how you can use them to your own advantage? Can you control your impulsive desire to have instant gratification in order to work toward a more worthwhile long-term goal? Have you ever wondered what exactly causes your own innocent child to somehow grow up to be a rapist or a sociopath?

Regardless of your lifestyle, whether you're a career person, a homemaker, a young college student, or a retired senior citizen, this book offers you an enormous variety of invaluable, fact-based information which is sure to help you with your relationships, your family, your career, and most important, knowing yourself. It is the critical education that everybody needs, yet virtually nobody receives in any formal way
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Must reading if you are interested in the future of the human race, 25. Mai 1996
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Emotional Intelligence (Gebundene Ausgabe)
This a book which makes clear the suddenly obvious central truth of being human -- we are emotional creatures first and last.Suddenly, it seems obvious that how we deal with this fact is -- after all is said and done-- the sole determiner of the quality of our lives. However, Goleman also brings together an authoritative array of research which "connects up the dots" of many separate fields of science. The picture of our selves and our society which emerges makes plain what, somehow, was not -- we need to learn what emotions are, how they work, and what skills we lack, and what those skills can accomplish. I think it is fair to say that there is no one who could not learn something seminal from this book, and those who deal with society -- educators and lawyers -- yes, lawyers -- should lead the pack in reading it. Thirty-three weeks on the best seller list says that we are hungry for this information. Thank you, Daniel Goleman
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