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8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen What's in the meat?, 25. August 2002
Von Ein Kunde
.
Read it. You may eat fast food now, but after reading Fast Food Nation, you may never enter a fast food restaurant again.
Fast Food Nation is a very frightening insight into not only the fast food business, but also into its entire supply chain, from the cattle ranches to the processing plants, the restaurants themselves and finally the end consumers.
The book is excellently researched, and includes an enormous amount of meticulously supported fact.
The story of the fast food business, can at times be somewhat drawn-out, however, the quantity of interesting and alarming information is adequate compensation.
The quote that says it all "There is shit in the meat".
Schlosser's book is not about fast food. It is about America. It is an insight into the entire culture. The people, the companies and the politics. He clearly shows that politicians do not always have the average persons best interest at heart, and in many cases the Fast Food Restaurant chains are more powerful than the Federal Authorities.
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13 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Enthüllungsjournalismus vom Feinsten, 13. März 2001
Von Ein Kunde
Nein, Eric Schlosser ist kein Vegetarier, er isst Fleisch. Aber nach der Lektüre seines Buches "Fast Food Nation" ist man versucht, Fleisch (vor allem in Form von Burgern) vom Speiseplan zu streichen. Nicht wegen BSE oder Maul- und Klauenseuche, sondern wegen seiner vielen erstklassig recherchierten und gelungen dargestellten Enthüllungen über die Fast Food Industrie und deren Zulieferer. Vom Schlachthoffleischer (und den sowohl erniedrigenden als auch unhygienischen Arbeitsbedingungen dort) über den industriellen Kartoffelbauern bis hin zum Schüler, der am Frittentopf und hinter der Theke steht - Schlosser hat die Leute hinter den schnellen Menüs bei der Arbeit besucht, sie interviewt und seine Erkenntnisse knallhart zu Papier gebracht. Selbst wenn seine Enthüllungen auf den US-Markt bezogen sind - der Einfluss der grossen Ketten ist international und ziemlich schockierend (direkt neben dem KZ Dachau hat eine der grossen Fast Food Ketten ihr Restaurant eröffnet - gibt es noch Moral und gesunden Menschenverstand???). Brilliantes Buch, meisterhaft geschrieben, extrem fesselnd zu lesen - und die Erkenntnis beim Leser bleibt haften - man ist, was man isst!
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Required reading!, 28. März 2005
Von Ein Kunde
The book is fascinating, and should be required reading for every high school student, or anyone who has ever eaten fast food. It examines practically all aspects of the fast food market: from its origins and development over the years, to modern agricultural production including two chapters on food-borne pathogens. Even the legal aspects of restaurant franchises and labor and worker safety laws come under scrutiny. It is very critical, but at the same time (in my opinion) a very balanced look at our whole culture. Schlosser's style is extremely approachable and clear. The book is very thought provoking and a pleasure to read. I couldn't put it down. It has made me much more aware of what is in food, where it comes from and how it is handled. It will certainly make me hesitate and think before I ever eat fast food again.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Thought-provoking, but often sensationlist, 29. August 2011
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
I found this book an interesting (though not light-hearted) read, especially the sections on artificial colors and flavors. You ARE what you eat...
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Hidden Costs of Mass Consumption of Fast Food, 11. Mai 2004
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
If you ever eat in fast food restaurants, you should read this book. It will fill your mind with issues that probably had not occurred to you before.

The fast food industry today is the service equivalent of the harshest environments of industrial America. The industry's size creates behemoths among its suppliers who can be even more aggressive in cost-cutting than are the employers of your neighboring teenagers. This book recounts the many dangers and hidden costs this industry imposes on everyone in our society, and suggests some ways to improve. The best defense, however, is a discerning consumer. Read this book to help become one.

Mr. Schlosser begins with the founding of the modern fast food companies, and traces them all back to Richard and Maurice McDonald's first hamburger parlor on E Street in San Bernardino, California. Carl Karcher (Carl's Jr.), Glenn Bell (Taco Bell), and the founder of Dunkin' Donuts all visited there and designed their stores to take advantage of those ideas about achieving higher throughput and consistency. Naturally, Ray Kroc later came along to refine the practices into the foundations of the modern McDonald's.

With success came market power, and abuses of that power. The book looks at several ills that have resulted. For example, the cost of meat needs to be as low as possible. This has led to dangerous conditions where many people are injured in the slaughter houses. His story of Kenny Dobbins at Montfort will chill you forever. The industry has also succeeded in getting inspection standards reduced so more harmful bacteria are making their way into your meal, and more people are getting sick. The old and the young are most likely to be harmed by the rapid growth of E. coli 0157:H7. This hit home with me, having just suffered a bout of food poisoning after a fast food meal last week. The Federal Government buys meat for school children with lower quality standards for bacterial contamination than even the fast food people apply. Pressure from slaughter houses on ranchers has driven many out of the business. The human price can be high, as one story recounts here.

The food is harmful in other ways. It is full of sugar and fat (that's what makes it taste good). The growth in obesity (what some people call an epidemic in America) closely tracks the expansion of fast food meals (25% of the population will eat at least one weekly). And the trend is getting worse, now that you can have unlimited refills of sugared soft drinks.

Children are especially vulnerable, because advertising is so persuasive to them. As a result, they go to eat the meals in search of toys and games, and other novelties.

Teenagers are often employed in fast food parlors in violation of the child labor laws, costing them sleep, exposing them to late night dangers, and leaving them too tired to focus on school. Those who deliver the food often create accidents and are at risk to be robbed.

The physical appearance and culture of towns is brought to the lowest common denominator by the drive to produce these meals fast and cheaply.

If the local management isn't very good, goofing off employees have been known to put noxious substances into the food. Franchisees often work long hours, costing them a normal life. Carl Karcher reported that he was still heavily in debt after 50 years in the industry. The main sign of progress he told the author was that the road outside used to be dirt, and was now paved.

These ills are being transported around the world now, as fast food is globalized.

Mr. Schlosser has several suggestions for improvement including tougher regulation of food, working conditions, and of advertising to children (he wants it banned). I thought his most realistic suggestion was that the fast food companies themselves lead the way by raising standards. McDonald's has done this in the past (to its credit), and could certainly do so again. After the facts in this book are more widely know, it is highly likely that there will be an interest in eating food from restaurants that provide these meals in more socially productive and humane ways. I know that I would shift my purchasing to reflect such improved standards.

To me, the interesting part of this story is that the problems exposed here are not hidden. This book could have been written at any time in the last 40 years. Why do we turn a blind eye to the problems that fast food creates?

After you finish this interesting and thorough book, I suggest that you consider where else problems exist that we do not pay attention to. For example, where does the sewage from your town go? What are the implications of how it is disposed of? Where does your trash go? What problems does that create? What are the pollution effects of your new SUV? How much more likely is your family to be injured or killed because it could roll over?

Consider all the costs of the products and services you consume, not just the ones you pay for directly to the person who sells to you.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Hidden Costs of Mass Consumption of Fast Food, 19. Juni 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
If you ever eat in fast food restaurants, you should read this book. It will fill your mind with issues that probably had not occurred to you before.

The fast food industry today is the service equivalent of the harshest environments of industrial America. The industry's size creates behemoths among its suppliers who can be even more aggressive in cost-cutting than are the employers of your neighboring teenagers. This book recounts the many dangers and hidden costs this industry imposes on everyone in our society, and suggests some ways to improve. The best defense, however, is a discerning consumer. Read this book to help become one.

Mr. Schlosser begins with the founding of the modern fast food companies, and traces them all back to Richard and Maurice McDonald's first hamburger parlor on E Street in San Bernardino, California. Carl Karcher (Carl's Jr.), Glenn Bell (Taco Bell), and the founder of Dunkin' Donuts all visited there and designed their stores to take advantage of those ideas about achieving higher throughput and consistency. Naturally, Ray Kroc later came along to refine the practices into the foundations of the modern McDonald's.

With success came market power, and abuses of that power. The book looks at several ills that have resulted. For example, the cost of meat needs to be as low as possible. This has led to dangerous conditions where many people are injured in the slaughter houses. His story of Kenny Dobbins at Montfort will chill you forever. The industry has also succeeded in getting inspection standards reduced so more harmful bacteria are making their way into your meal, and more people are getting sick. The old and the young are most likely to be harmed by the rapid growth of E. coli 0157:H7. This hit home with me, having just suffered a bout of food poisoning after a fast food meal last week. The Federal Government buys meat for school children with lower quality standards for bacterial contamination than even the fast food people apply. Pressure from slaughter houses on ranchers has driven many out of the business. The human price can be high, as one story recounts here.

The food is harmful in other ways. It is full of sugar and fat (that's what makes it taste good). The growth in obesity (what some people call an epidemic in America) closely tracks the expansion of fast food meals (25% of the population will eat at least one weekly). And the trend is getting worse, now that you can have unlimited refills of sugared soft drinks.

Children are especially vulnerable, because advertising is so persuasive to them. As a result, they go to eat the meals in search of toys and games, and other novelties.

Teenagers are often employed in fast food parlors in violation of the child labor laws, costing them sleep, exposing them to late night dangers, and leaving them too tired to focus on school. Those who deliver the food often create accidents and are at risk to be robbed.

The physical appearance and culture of towns is brought to the lowest common denominator by the drive to produce these meals fast and cheaply.

If the local management isn't very good, goofing off employees have been known to put noxious substances into the food. Franchisees often work long hours, costing them a normal life. Carl Karcher reported that he was still heavily in debt after 50 years in the industry. The main sign of progress he told the author was that the road outside used to be dirt, and was now paved.

These ills are being transported around the world now, as fast food is globalized.

Mr. Schlosser has several suggestions for improvement including tougher regulation of food, working conditions, and of advertising to children (he wants it banned). I thought his most realistic suggestion was that the fast food companies themselves lead the way by raising standards. McDonald's has done this in the past (to its credit), and could certainly do so again. After the facts in this book are more widely know, it is highly likely that there will be an interest in eating food from restaurants that provide these meals in more socially productive and humane ways. I know that I would shift my purchasing to reflect such improved standards.

To me, the interesting part of this story is that the problems exposed here are not hidden. This book could have been written at any time in the last 40 years. Why do we turn a blind eye to the problems that fast food creates?

After you finish this interesting and thorough book, I suggest that you consider where else problems exist that we do not pay attention to. For example, where does the sewage from your town go? What are the implications of how it is disposed of? Where does your trash go? What problems does that create? What are the pollution effects of your new SUV? How much more likely is your family to be injured or killed because it could roll over?

Consider all the costs of the products and services you consume, not just the ones you pay for directly to the person who sells to you.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Hidden Costs of Mass Consumption of Fast Food, 19. Juni 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
If you ever eat in fast food restaurants, you should read this book. It will fill your mind with issues that probably had not occurred to you before.

The fast food industry today is the service equivalent of the harshest environments of industrial America. The industry's size creates behemoths among its suppliers who can be even more aggressive in cost-cutting than are the employers of your neighboring teenagers. This book recounts the many dangers and hidden costs this industry imposes on everyone in our society, and suggests some ways to improve. The best defense, however, is a discerning consumer. Read this book to help become one.

Mr. Schlosser begins with the founding of the modern fast food companies, and traces them all back to Richard and Maurice McDonald's first hamburger parlor on E Street in San Bernardino, California. Carl Karcher (Carl's Jr.), Glenn Bell (Taco Bell), and the founder of Dunkin' Donuts all visited there and designed their stores to take advantage of those ideas about achieving higher throughput and consistency. Naturally, Ray Kroc later came along to refine the practices into the foundations of the modern McDonald's.

With success came market power, and abuses of that power. The book looks at several ills that have resulted. For example, the cost of meat needs to be as low as possible. This has led to dangerous conditions where many people are injured in the slaughter houses. His story of Kenny Dobbins at Montfort will chill you forever. The industry has also succeeded in getting inspection standards reduced so more harmful bacteria are making their way into your meal, and more people are getting sick. The old and the young are most likely to be harmed by the rapid growth of E. coli 0157:H7. This hit home with me, having just suffered a bout of food poisoning after a fast food meal last week. The Federal Government buys meat for school children with lower quality standards for bacterial contamination than even the fast food people apply. Pressure from slaughter houses on ranchers has driven many out of the business. The human price can be high, as one story recounts here.

The food is harmful in other ways. It is full of sugar and fat (that's what makes it taste good). The growth in obesity (what some people call an epidemic in America) closely tracks the expansion of fast food meals (25% of the population will eat at least one weekly). And the trend is getting worse, now that you can have unlimited refills of sugared soft drinks.

Children are especially vulnerable, because advertising is so persuasive to them. As a result, they go to eat the meals in search of toys and games, and other novelties.

Teenagers are often employed in fast food parlors in violation of the child labor laws, costing them sleep, exposing them to late night dangers, and leaving them too tired to focus on school. Those who deliver the food often create accidents and are at risk to be robbed.

The physical appearance and culture of towns is brought to the lowest common denominator by the drive to produce these meals fast and cheaply.

If the local management isn't very good, goofing off employees have been known to put noxious substances into the food. Franchisees often work long hours, costing them a normal life. Carl Karcher reported that he was still heavily in debt after 50 years in the industry. The main sign of progress he told the author was that the road outside used to be dirt, and was now paved.

These ills are being transported around the world now, as fast food is globalized.

Mr. Schlosser has several suggestions for improvement including tougher regulation of food, working conditions, and of advertising to children (he wants it banned). I thought his most realistic suggestion was that the fast food companies themselves lead the way by raising standards. McDonald's has done this in the past (to its credit), and could certainly do so again. After the facts in this book are more widely know, it is highly likely that there will be an interest in eating food from restaurants that provide these meals in more socially productive and humane ways. I know that I would shift my purchasing to reflect such improved standards.

To me, the interesting part of this story is that the problems exposed here are not hidden. This book could have been written at any time in the last 40 years. Why do we turn a blind eye to the problems that fast food creates?

After you finish this interesting and thorough book, I suggest that you consider where else problems exist that we do not pay attention to. For example, where does the sewage from your town go? What are the implications of how it is disposed of? Where does your trash go? What problems does that create? What are the pollution effects of your new SUV? How much more likely is your family to be injured or killed because it could roll over?

Consider all the costs of the products and services you consume, not just the ones you pay for directly to the person who sells to you.
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