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23 von 25 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Grass Is Always Greener . . . Someplace Else
My rating of this book is based on the quality of the writing. If I were to rate the book instead for the appropriateness of what is described, I would rate it as a "zero." Before going further, let me mention that this book describes more immorality, lack of consideration, and disgusting behavior than you will read in five usual novels. If such things upset you, this...
Veröffentlicht am 25. Juli 2007 von Donald Mitchell

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen A statement of life
A few have been critical of On the Road for the absence of a point. Devotees have responded by saying that that criticism misses the point precisely. My advice would be to look for the cumulative effect. Compared with great literature On the Road is lacking, but it was not intended to be. Rather, examine On the Road as a slice of life. Ideally, your experience reading...
Veröffentlicht am 30. Juli 2000 von Amazon Customer


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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Grass Is Always Greener . . . Someplace Else, 25. Juli 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
My rating of this book is based on the quality of the writing. If I were to rate the book instead for the appropriateness of what is described, I would rate it as a "zero." Before going further, let me mention that this book describes more immorality, lack of consideration, and disgusting behavior than you will read in five usual novels. If such things upset you, this book will be a poor choice for you to read.

This autobiographical novel is a paean to the hunger and optimism of youth. Everyone you meet in the book is convinced that something much better lies in the next town, in the next relationship, or in the next hit of "tea." The irony of this is nicely explored through the character of Dean Moriarty (Kerouac's friend, Neil Cassady, in real life) who constantly is adrift among the three women he has married.

The uplifting part of the book is found in the way that things somehow work out for everyone involved, even though they lack resources, insight, and appropriate caution. In their giddy gambles on new experiences, they hit the winning numbers often enough to be able to keep coming back for more. Their rootlessness and commitment to experimentation define them in the same way that the Depression defined their parents.

The brilliance of this book is that although you will probably not approve of the irresponsible lives the characters live, you will find yourself deeply involved with them. You will probably also know how they feel. In one vivid sequence, the bipolar Moriarty recreates a memory by almost crashing the car he is driving . . . just to make his point. In the aftermath, he quicky falls asleep, and someone else has to drive.

Youth can be very manipulative, and Kerouac's male pals certainly exemplify that impulsive weakness. Out of money, they steal, beg, borrow, lie, and do whatever it takes to score some. Then, they will spend whatever they have to last them for weeks on a spree covering just a few hours. Moriarty routinely leaves people in strange cities with no money and no friends, and forgets about them. Another pal marries a woman so he can get her to pay for a cross-country drive. When her money runs out in Arizona, he abandons her.

Kerouac's writing captures all of this in a remarkably vivid way. He has a lust for experiences that makes the world fresh and new. For example, he lovingly describes being a cotton picker, one of the worst jobs available at the time. The descriptions of what it is like to listen to jazz are remarkably effective and will probably attract new fans for years. Unfortunately, he also glamorizes drug usage which will also probably generate a lot of new fans for that, as well.

Road trips are a classic way that young men blow off steam in college. Freed from the restraints of being around those who supervise them, life seems more open and everything is possible. The men in this novel are mostly veterans who can get G.I. bill funds for their education. This can help fund road trips across the country, when the urge to travel hits them, tied to either their sense of being footloose or a vague promise of a bed on the other coast. Even after they marry and begin to raise families, the behavior changes little. These are Peter Pans who have adult responsibilities.

While most of what these people do are things that I do not consider commendable, this book took me back to my youth in very fundamental ways. I recalled each and every one of my "conservative" road trips with great relish and delight. I hadn't thought about them in years. I suspect that this book will be a "youth drug" for making you feel like a teenager again, too.

After you have enjoyed the great writing and the reminiscences that the book inspires, I suggest that you think about the exemplary things you did as a young person. How can you share those experiences with others in ways that will inspire them to want to serve goodness in the same ways?

Be open to life's potential . . . and be prepared to help enhance it with your responsible participation.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fast Paced, Stream of Consciousness Writing, Fantastic!, 13. März 2009
Von 
James Gallen (St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
"The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"

This was my first introduction to Jack Kerouac. I found this book to be fantastic! For those like me who have heard of Kerouac and "On The Road" but really do not know what it is about I will provide a brief synopsis without giving too much away. It is the story of Sal Paradise (substitute for Kerouac) and his friend, Dean Moriarty (modeled on Kerouac's friend) and their late 1940s cross country searches for "it", music, sex, liquor...life, as they know it.

Those who have read my other reviews may be surprised at my gushing praise for this classic of the Beat Generation. The life style described in this book is, in my opinion, utterly disgusting. What makes this book great, to my taste, is the writing style. It is a fast paced, stream of consciousness description of totally irresponsible, hedonistic behavior. I would not recommend this life style to anyone but I do recommend the book to any fan of great writing with the maturity to avoid the siren call to take to the road.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen "Let's start the car and blow some air!" (Sal), 27. Mai 2013
To enable his frenetic continuous typing, Jack Kerouac simply scotch-taped several sheets of tracing paper together, creating a 120-foot-long roll he fed into his type writer - not as some critics would have it, a roll of Teletype-paper. The entire scroll consists indeed of one single paragraph, written single-spaced, and giving the real names of the protagonists in the published novel. The scroll was auctioned off by the Kerouac estate for $2.4 million in 2001 to Jim Irsay (owner of the football team Indianapolis Colts), who makes it available for public viewing.

The novel is set in 1947, although it was written in 1950. Neal Cassady and Jack Kerouac (Dean Moriarty and Sal Paradise in the book) started their 1800 miles drive to Mexico City to visit William Burroughs. Kerouac compares the narrative as a specific era in jazz history, "somewhere between its Charlie Parker Ornithology period and another period that began with Miles Davis." The narrative begins in New York, passes Chicago and drives across the continent to San Francisco, where Sal takes a job as a night watchman at a boarding house for merchant sailors. But he is soon on the road again.

The "civilized" world he’d left behind was gripped in Cold War paranoia under the impression of the Korean War, the U.S. had built the hydrogen bomb and Kerouac was depressed and convinced he might as well die. But high on grass, bouncing along Mexican roads, he experienced a happy hallucination: a microburst of gold shot from the sky right into his startled eyes. This was the moment, he later wrote, that at last made On the Road possible, the "great Occasion" when he had the vision that Dean was God, and God had the face of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the hero who had saved the world from oppression and slavery. Small wonder that to Kerouac this seemed “the most pleasant and graceful trip in the world.

When Dean and Sal reached the La Mexica, they encountered thousands of hipsters in floppy straw hats and long- lapeled jackets, some of them selling crucifixes and weed in the alleys and Mambo blared from everywhere. They found an apartment close to Bill and Joan Burroughs, who had fled the U.S. after Bill’s last drug bust and was writing one of the classic confessional novels of Beat literature. But Mexico City developed into a disaster and soon Sal found himself at loose ends, stayed stoned, smoking fifteen joints a day, and helped himself to Bill’s morphine. After another hallucination in which he saw himself as the saintly hero and prophetic author of On the Road, he left Mexico just one month later and began walking to New York, occasionally hitching a ride. Despite the pain and heartbreak of his misadventure, On the Road was taking shape in his soul.

It is this long trip across half a continent to Mexico City with Dean that can be interpreted as Sal’s last attempt at finding an answer to his problems. The novel comes to a close a year later in New York, where Dean recommends to move to San Francisco, however that doesn’t work and Dean returns to the West alone. The novel ends with Sal sitting on a New York pier during sunset, contemplating God, America, crying children, and closing with "I think of Dean Moriarty, I even think of Old Dean Moriarty the father we never found, I think of Dean Moriarty."

Jack Kerouac’s life in New York turned out to be as tumultuous as his stay in Mexico, but in 1951, the book took its final form as an ode to Neal Cassady. However, Kerouac had a long and difficult time finding a publisher. His experimental writing style and sympathies towards minorities made many edtors highly uncomfortable, in post-War America. Graphic descriptions of drug-use and homosexual behavior could even provoke obscenity charges. Finally the book was published in 1957 by Viking and created a sensation and hasn’t lost it’s faszination even today.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Klassiker, 21. Dezember 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Eine super Geschichte, mitreissend und gute detaillierte Beschreibungen. Auch gut als Geschenk für fans von road trips, vor allem in der USA
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5.0 von 5 Sternen nostalgisch lesen, 29. November 2012
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meine jugend kommt zurück in diesem buch. aufregend, amüsant, etwas traurig, wehmütig und fröhlich - diese stimmungen versammeln sich alle zusammen, wenn man jack kerouac liest.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A must (re)read, 7. Juli 2012
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Undoubtably one of the most influential books of the 20th century, and well worth re-reading at different stages of your life. Just re-read 'On The Road' and understand the characters in a completely different way now (read it first when I was 19 and am now 27). Well worth a read if you haven't before, or a re-read if you have!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Follow your inner moonlight, 24. Februar 2009
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
I'm a great fan of the "New York Beats" but Jack Kerouac's novel "On the Road" will probably follow me through my whole life. I've read the book three times by now (first in German then twice in English) and cannot wait to read it again. I have always been fascinated by how Kerouac gives poetic descriptions of certain situations and people albeit his prosaic style and usage of everyday vocabulary. This book makes me dream and laugh and cry and listen to the beat of my heart and life.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Grass Is Always Greener . . . Someplace Else, 25. Juli 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
My rating of this book is based on the quality of the writing. If I were to rate the book instead for the appropriateness of what is described, I would rate it as a "zero." Before going further, let me mention that this book describes more immorality, lack of consideration, and disgusting behavior than you will read in five usual novels. If such things upset you, this book will be a poor choice for you to read.

This autobiographical novel is a paean to the hunger and optimism of youth. Everyone you meet in the book is convinced that something much better lies in the next town, in the next relationship, or in the next hit of "tea." The irony of this is nicely explored through the character of Dean Moriarty (Kerouac's friend, Neil Cassady, in real life) who constantly is adrift among the three women he has married.

The uplifting part of the book is found in the way that things somehow work out for everyone involved, even though they lack resources, insight, and appropriate caution. In their giddy gambles on new experiences, they hit the winning numbers often enough to be able to keep coming back for more. Their rootlessness and commitment to experimentation define them in the same way that the Depression defined their parents.

The brilliance of this book is that although you will probably not approve of the irresponsible lives the characters live, you will find yourself deeply involved with them. You will probably also know how they feel. In one vivid sequence, the bipolar Moriarty recreates a memory by almost crashing the car he is driving . . . just to make his point. In the aftermath, he quicky falls asleep, and someone else has to drive.

Youth can be very manipulative, and Kerouac's male pals certainly exemplify that impulsive weakness. Out of money, they steal, beg, borrow, lie, and do whatever it takes to score some. Then, they will spend whatever they have to last them for weeks on a spree covering just a few hours. Moriarty routinely leaves people in strange cities with no money and no friends, and forgets about them. Another pal marries a woman so he can get her to pay for a cross-country drive. When her money runs out in Arizona, he abandons her.

Kerouac's writing captures all of this in a remarkably vivid way. He has a lust for experiences that makes the world fresh and new. For example, he lovingly describes being a cotton picker, one of the worst jobs available at the time. The descriptions of what it is like to listen to jazz are remarkably effective and will probably attract new fans for years. Unfortunately, he also glamorizes drug usage which will also probably generate a lot of new fans for that, as well.

Road trips are a classic way that young men blow off steam in college. Freed from the restraints of being around those who supervise them, life seems more open and everything is possible. The men in this novel are mostly veterans who can get G.I. bill funds for their education. This can help fund road trips across the country, when the urge to travel hits them, tied to either their sense of being footloose or a vague promise of a bed on the other coast. Even after they marry and begin to raise families, the behavior changes little. These are Peter Pans who have adult responsibilities.

While most of what these people do are things that I do not consider commendable, this book took me back to my youth in very fundamental ways. I recalled each and every one of my "conservative" road trips with great relish and delight. I hadn't thought about them in years. I suspect that this book will be a "youth drug" for making you feel like a teenager again, too.

After you have enjoyed the great writing and the reminiscences that the book inspires, I suggest that you think about the exemplary things you did as a young person. How can you share those experiences with others in ways that will inspire them to want to serve goodness in the same ways?

Be open to life's potential . . . and be prepared to help enhance it with your responsible participation.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen A statement of life, 30. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
A few have been critical of On the Road for the absence of a point. Devotees have responded by saying that that criticism misses the point precisely. My advice would be to look for the cumulative effect. Compared with great literature On the Road is lacking, but it was not intended to be. Rather, examine On the Road as a slice of life. Ideally, your experience reading On the Road would be life-changing, but each of us is at different stages of life and therefore, we cannot experience it uniformly. Everyone should read Kerouac, to get a glimpse of history and maybe to understand a generation, another time. Recommended for anyone high school and up.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Can't Beat this Beatnik, 25. Juli 2000
Von 
Z. Blume (St. Louis, MO United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
As many reviewers wrote when this book first appeared, On The Road defined the Beat Generation. This it certainly does, but it also does a wonderful job of showing the romance and tragedy of the people who were disillusioned after the Second World War and who constantly uprooted themselves and refused to settle down, hoping to find some purpose and to constanly learn about people and life. Kerouac's descriptions of his aimless travels throughout the United States and all of the characters who wander in and out of his story are all colorful and certainly captivating. For someone who knew little of this lifestyle before reading this book, it was a facsinating lesson. I do agree with another reviewer, however, that it would be interesting to read the text in the free form style in which Kerouac wrote the book, but aside from that minor detail I could not recommend this book enough.
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On the Road
On the Road von Jack Kerouac
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