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5.0 von 5 Sternen A most encouraging and challenging book on Christianity
Philip Yancey is one of my favorite authors, and this book is definitely one of his best. We live in a sick world that is desperately searching for hope and meaning. God's grace is the answer to all of life's problems, and those who follow Christ have the answer to all the questions; yet grace like God's is so unfathomable from our earthly perspective. Yancey does an...
Veröffentlicht am 2. Juli 2000 von Nicholas Vafiades

versus
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Yancey told one side of the story well
Well-written as are all of Yancey's books, full of passion and good ideas, What's so Amazing About Grace is also seriously out of balance, in my opinion. The uncritical adulation heaped upon the book by the Christian community, and Yancey's willingness to accept that adulation (see his own comments above, and also the reviews on the cover of the book) reveals, it...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Juli 1999 von d.marshall@sun.ac.jp


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3.0 von 5 Sternen Yancey told one side of the story well, 13. Juli 1999
Well-written as are all of Yancey's books, full of passion and good ideas, What's so Amazing About Grace is also seriously out of balance, in my opinion. The uncritical adulation heaped upon the book by the Christian community, and Yancey's willingness to accept that adulation (see his own comments above, and also the reviews on the cover of the book) reveals, it seems to me, a corresponding lack of balance in contemporary Christian thinking which accounts for a lot.
I found four serious problems with the book. First, it seemed to me the word "Ungrace" was left ill-defined. When a father spanks his son, is that ungrace? When a judge sentences a thief to prison, is that ungrace? When a soldier fires on an enemy in combat, is that ungrace? The examples and tone of Yancey's book lead the reader naturally to include all cases of retribution and punishment in this category. At the least, he set the ball rolling in that direction and erected no clear barrier to it. And yet in each of these cases the person involved may be doing his duty as a Christian, may even be exercising courage, wisdom, and yes, love that border on the heroic, in an attempt to obey God. Should actions which arise out of a desire to "Love God and love others" be lumped with mass-murder and child molestation in a single category? "Ungrace" seems to embrace all actions not arising specifically out of an urge towards forgiveness and unmerited kindness. It abstracts a single virtue out of the matrix of the complete Christian life and makes it absolute, which, as C.S.Lewis pointed out, is a dangerous thing to to.
Second, while Yancey discussed the cost of grace to the agent of grace, he did not discuss or adequately consider the often much greater cost to the recipient or to innocent bystanders. Many point in the book, the question almost brought itself up, but without eliciting the attention from the author that it deserved. For example, Yancey mentioned the murder rate in Japan, which is a tiny fraction of that in the U.S., and ascribed it (in part) to society's ungrateous treatment of criminals. The obvious question, which he did not raise, might be stated thus: is the personal cruelty the families expressed towards those criminals too high a price for the tens of thousands of lives that the system saves every year? Or to put it another way, should we sacrifice the lives of ten potential innocent victims, not to mention the freedom of everyone to go out at night (I live in Japan) so that one actual criminal might be shown mercy? If Christians think the example of Jesus on the cross provides an easy answer to that question in the affirmative, it seems to me position at least replies a more rigorous and systematic argument. Again, Yancey noted that since divorce has been tolerated in the United States, the divorce rate has risen to one half. SO then are all the children who miss out on a father or mother an acceptable sacrifice to what he calls grace?
The example Yancey began his book with was the most extreme, and made my blood boil. Having myself worked in places where girls were sold into prostitution for the sake of their parents addictions, my reaction may have been somewhat different from that of most readers. If it were up to me, I would send that woman to the prison for life, or the electric chair, in an instant, if it would save her little girl from the abuse she was subject to. At the very least, I insist that the good of the victim should be considered before that of the person who is preying upon her, and I think the Bible says so too. Yancey, on the other hand, didn't seem to even think of the little girl, except as part of the shame her mother experienced. The woman complained that church would "only make me feel worse," he reported What, should the thought of proximity to the Christian God make a person who is selling her daughter into prostitution feel better?
Third, the Bible does talk about judgement as well as grace, and not just the first half. Can Yancey ignore those passages and still call his view Christian? As Yancey wrote with Dr. Paul Brand in their book on Pain, there is no substitute for physical pain for reminding us to take care of our bodies. Does not the threat of judgement (ungrace) play the same role in encouraging us to see to our spiritual health? And what are we to do with the words of the prophets? Has human psychology and the character of God really changed so radically that we can now interpret the rest of the New Testament exclusively in the light of a few chapters in Romans?
It seems to me that many examples of "ungrace" Yancey gave involved blue-collar workers or other simple Christians who lack his education or subtlety of expression. They may lack wisdom, I agree, but I know some Christians like that who on paper would sound equally "ungracious," but in practice show true Christian love. I think it possible some of them were just trying to stand up for God in the only way they knew how.
Finally, Yancey wrote that "some studies" show that Christians are equally likely to rent x-rated movies, divorce, and have abortions, his point being that legalistic preaching on sex hasn't worked. Yancey didn't argue that the studies were accurate, and they sound suspicious to me, because I know that the warnings of the Bible have an effect on some people, anyway. But if in fact Christian preaching against evil has no impact on anyone, why do we bother with it at all? Why does Yancey think anyone will really listen to him, either?
In any case, his conclusion here, that fundamentalist rules have if anything an opposite effect to their design, conflicts with his other examples, which show that Japanese legalism, for one, succeeds very well, resulting in dramatically reduced crime.
Having grown up like Yancey in a strict Christian church, it seemed to me the church is not too strict about sex, but far and away too lax. Even good pastors seem afraid to bring the subject up, or maybe they don't realize how important it is to young people. Having listened to sermons in hundreds of churches and youth groups, I can only vaguely recall hearing someone venture to guide Christians on this subject a few times. In this case, as Chesterton put it about Christianity in general, Christian morality has not been tried and found wanted, it has been found difficult and not tried at all -- at least not recently.
We are all in need of God's grace, myself no less than anyone. And praise God for the wonderful examples of grace Yancey gave. But surely we can find a way to integrate the laws of God and the love of God in a more wholistic, and truly loving way? Yancey is a fabulous writer, but in my opinion he does not show a very complete grasp of the Biblical approach or the real-life complexities of this problem.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A most encouraging and challenging book on Christianity, 2. Juli 2000
Philip Yancey is one of my favorite authors, and this book is definitely one of his best. We live in a sick world that is desperately searching for hope and meaning. God's grace is the answer to all of life's problems, and those who follow Christ have the answer to all the questions; yet grace like God's is so unfathomable from our earthly perspective. Yancey does an admirable job in putting "flesh" on the concept of biblical grace - - showing us what it is, by giving us examples of grace and "ungrace," as Yancey calls it, in the lives of real people. Not a boring theological treatise, but an immensely encouraging book that offers a glimpse of the depth and expansiveness of God's amazing grace. Chapter Two, in which Yancey summarizes the plot of the movie "Babette's Feast" as a beautiful parable of what grace looks like is worth the price of the book alone! But Yancey is also honest enough to admit that the church mostly does a very poor job of extending God's grace to others -- a much needed wake-up call for Christians. All this to say - - read this book!
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Grace, Bland and Boring?, 19. August 1998
My least favorite book on grace that i've read so far. The Ragamuffin Gospel by Brennan Manning packed a far more awesome emotional punch, completely and utterly changing my entire way of living out my Christian life, and The Grace Awakening by Chuck Swindoll brought home the point theologically and gave great insights on how to act towards others with grace.
What's So Amazing About Grace rarely mentions grace, with almost entire chapters going with nary a mention of the word. Yancey has an excellent chapter on Christians not being involved in politics, but it's out of place, like the rest of the book.
Guess you can't please all the people all the time. *shrug*
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Einen künstlerischen Zugang finden, 5. November 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: What's So Amazing About Grace? (Kindle Edition)
Vorbemerkung: Diese Rezension ist Teil der Reihe 'gelesen & geschätzt' auf meinem Blog, bei der ich jede Woche in Buch rezensiere. Schaut mal vorbei.

Es gibt diese Geschichte, dass C.S. Lewis einmal auf einem Kongress von Theologen und Religionswissenschaftlern auftauchte (und ich weiß nicht, ob sie wirklich historisch ist), und dort gefragt wird, was das Christentum von den anderen Religionen unterscheide. „Das ist einfach‟, soll er bei der Gelegenheit geantwortet haben, „die Gnade.‟
Wenn das stimmt, und ich habe viel Sympathie für diese Position, aber ich bin auch kein vergleichender Religionswissenschaftler, dann ist es von besonderer Bedeutung, dass wir das Konzept Gnade richtig verstehen, wenn wir uns mit dem Herz unseres Glaubens auseinander setzen.
Dafür gibt es den Ansatz der „Lehren der Gnade‟, die in sich einige wunderbare und schöne Wahrheiten halten, und in die sich zu versenken oft eine wirkliche Freude ist (nicht umsonst ist mein Andachtsbuch am Abend momentan: Coffee with Calvin). Aber viel zu oft scheint es vielen Menschen so, als würde dabei aus einem Gedicht eine Gedichtinterpretation gemacht werden.
Für viele von uns verhält sich der Calvinismus zur Gnade wie das zweite Semester unseres Grundkurses Deutsch im Abitur zu Eichendorffs Wünscherute.
Es ist irgendwie so, als hätten sie es verstanden, aber doch nicht begriffen.
Als ich vor einigen Wochen wieder zu Yanceys wunderbarem Buch What's so amazing about Grace gegriffen habe, wurde mir schon wieder bei den ersten Seiten klar, das der Ansatz, den Yancey in diesem Buch fährt, ein völlig anderer ist.
Er begreift Gnade als etwas poetisches, etwas, dessen Schönheit nicht in Logik zu fassen ist, sondern nur in Prosa und Gedicht und Erleben.
Dabei versucht er, einen geradezu künstlerischen Zugang zu dem Thema Gnade zu schaffen, und hat dadurch mehr Gnade zu meinem Herzen gesprochen, als viele Systematische Theologien vorher.

Ein Potpurri kultureller Referenzen
Man kann Yancey Schreibstil mögen oder nicht, aber mich fasziniert sein fast enzyklopädisches Wissen und seine Belesenheit in aller-Weltsliteratur. Fast wie ein Teppichknüpfer verbindet er in den Kapitels Zitate von Frederick Buechner, Dostojewsky, Paul Tillich und anderen bekannten Denkern und Philosophen, um seinen Punkt zu machen.
Dabei wirkt es aber nie so, als würde er nur abschreiben und zusammentragen, sondern seine Gedanken aus einer Vielzahl von Quellen beziehen. Sein Beitrag in diesem Buch ist also weniger, dass er neue Gedanken präsentiert, als dass er alte Gedanken zusammenträgt und oftmals auf ganz neue Art und Weise fruchtbar machen kann.
Ich denke, dass vor allem hierin die große Stärke des Buches liegt. Während andere Bücher versuchen, die Gnade neu zu präsentieren, lässt Yancey an vielen Punkten einfach die Menschen sprechen, die sie vor ihm durchdacht haben, oder viel mehr solche, die sie erlebt haben. Mich persönlich hat dabei das Kapitel über Leo Tolstoi und Fjodor Dostojewsky begeistert, in der er beschreibt, wie der eine zwar ein großer Moraliker war, einer der Moral und Gesetz verstanden hatte, aber der andere das Konzept Gnade in seinen Büchern groß gemacht hat.
Ich kenne viele Leute, denen Dostojevsky und Tolstoi zu schwer wiegen, und die sogar die Brüder Karamasov nach einigen Seiten weggelegt haben (unerklärlich!). Aber Yancey schafft es, die Faszination, die von diesen Autoren für viele von uns ausgehen, auch für die generelle Öffentlichkeit fruchtbar zu machen, und das Konzept Gnade dadurch deutlicher zu machen.
Nur erklärt er nicht was Gnade ist.
Yancey versucht nicht zu sezieren, welche Vorstellungen von Gnade wann vorherrschten und welche die logischen, oder die theologisch sauberen sind. Er zieht es vor, Gnade bei der Arbeit zuzusehen (um es mal so auszudrücken) und dabei den Mund nicht mehr zu schließen vor Staunen.

Staunen über die Gnade
Das Buch lädt vor allem dazu ein, über die Gnade zu staunen. Nicht wie ein Trainer, der uns dazu anhält, sondern wie ein Kind, das uns einlädt, mitzumachen.
Und gerade darin liegt die Essenz, die das Buch zu einem 'Pageturner' macht, ohne das Robert Langdon darin einer alten Geheimorganisation nachjagen muss. Es ist mehr der generelle Durst nach Gnade, den viele in der westlichen Welt verspüren, in einer Welt, die immer gnaden-loser wird. Während sich die Welt schneller dreht, die Märkte immer mehr wachsen (und immer hungriger werden), und man nicht mehr genau weiß, wie lange man das Tempo noch halten kann, lädt Yancey in seinem Buch dazu auf, einmal zu verschnaufen und darüber nachzudenken, was wirklich zählt, und was wirklich glücklich macht. Wie an der Stelle, als er den Zwischenschluss zieht:

„Grace is unfair, which is one of the hardest things about it. It is unreasonable to expect a woman to forgive the terrible things her father did to her just because he apologizes many years later, and totally unfair to ask that a mother overlook the many offenses her teenage son comitted. Grace, however, is not about fairness.‟ (S.80f)

Es hat mich dazu gebracht, scharf einzuatmen, weil mir augenblicklich bewusst wurde, dass ich unterschwellig zumindest Gott gegenüber genau das annehme. „Gott wird mir vergeben‟, hat Heinrich Heine einmal gesagt, „das ist ja sein Job.‟ Und ich merke schnell, dass ich am Sonntag über die verschwenderische Gnade Gottes reden kann, teuer genug, dass er seinen Sohn dafür am Kreuz sterben lässt um sie zu erkaufen, und am Montag nehme ich sie wieder für selbstverständlich. Yancey hat mich immer wieder daran erinnert, dass ich Gnade nicht für selbstverständlich halten soll, sondern für die stärkste Kraft, die dieses Universum am Laufen hält, und die einzige, die es zu verändern im Stande ist.

Aber was ist Gnade dann?
Bei alledem definiert er Gnade allerdings nie wirklich. Es fehlt ein Kapitel, in dem er in kurzen Worten schreibt, was er unter dem Wort Gnade eigentlich versteht. Dadurch kann es intellektuell manchmal schwierig werden, dem Autor zu folgen. Manchmal scheint er Gnade zum Beispiel als Synonym für 'Vergebung' zu verwenden – wobei ich sagen würde, dass Gnade die Grundlage, oder Quelle für Vergebung ist, und nicht dasselbe. An anderer Stelle scheint Gnade mehr so etwas wie bedingungslose Liebe zu sein („'To love a person', said Dostoevsky, 'means to see him as God intended him to be.'‟ [S.175]). Aber dann haben wir das gleiche Problem: Ich denke, dass bedingunglose Liebe mehr eine Art Quelle von Gnade ist, nicht dasselbe.
Als ich das Buch fertig gelesen hatte, erinnere ich mich, dass ich mich geborgen gefühlt habe, und gefüllt bis an den Rand mit Dankbarkeit für einen Gott, der verschwenderisch aus seiner Gnade austeilt und uns daran teilhaben lässt, und uns daraus schöpfen lässt, um sie weiterzugeben. Nur hatte ich nicht wirklich eine bessere Vorstellung davon, was Gnade dann eigentlich ist

Fazit
Ein Buch zu schreiben, das mehr die Poeten unter uns anspricht als die Philosophen, um das Konzept Gnade wieder an unser Herz zu lassen, ist sicher sehr hilfreich. Viele von uns können mit den kalten, systematischen Ansätzen zum Thema Gnade nicht viel Anfangen, weil wir den Eindruck haben, dass sie mehr für das Herz bestimmt ist und nicht für den Kopf.
Es liegt vielleicht daran, dass ich mich zu diesen Leuten zähle, dass mir das Buch so eine unheimliche Freude gemacht hat. Es liegt aber vielleicht auch daran, dass ich durch mein Studium mit einer soliden Basis ausgerüstet wurde, das Wort 'Gnade' auch mit einem Konzept und einem Innenleben auszustatten.
Deswegen sei jedem Leser, der „What's so amazing about Grace‟ genossen hat, auch Michael Hortons „Putting Amazing Back Into Grace‟ empfohlen. Mit beiden Büchern sind Herz und Kopf sicherlich gut ausgestattet, Gnade in eine taube Welt zu sprechen.

God Bless,
Restless Evangelical
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Amazing Grace, Grace, 24. Januar 2000
I am occasionally afraid of christian. I am a christian. So I can't be free of it. Because more having knowledge about Bible, more criticizing other persons skillfully.
This book is a kind of impact. I want to be a christian of grace.
Thank you, Phillip Yancey. I write a book review in a monthly magazine in Korea. In this month I wrote about this book.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Agree with Kex86 and its great reading., 19. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I'd like to thank Phil Yancey for writing this book. At times his words hit me square on the chest. Other times I found myself cringing at my own ungraciousness, and Yancey doesn't even know me. This is great reading.
Kex86 and I have the same frustration. I was looking for more help with the personal question: how do I live graciously AND live a principled life (I live in Mich, just a few miles from Jack Kevorkian).
Yancey twice danced near my question. He asks, "How can a Christian dispense grace in a society that seems to be veering away from God?" (p. 241); and "What would a subversive church look like in the modern United States?" (p. 263).
One time he asks my question head on: "How can Christians uphold moral values in a secular society while at the same time conveying a spirit of grace and love?" (p. 230) But I've had trouble ferreting out his quidance.
Working through the book a second time I culled a bit of help: 1) maintain a higher personal ethic than the surrounding world, 2) consistently obey the command to "love one another"; 3) know that love (grace) transcends politics -- "the person is more important than policy"; and 4) remember that Christ came down, that the "ladder of grace reaches down" (pp 263-266).
But with Kevorkian delivering two more bodies yesterday and his attorney announcing he wants to be Govenor of Michigan, I feel a need for more specific guidance. My children are watching.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen One of three books I'd pick if stranded on that desert isle, 17. Mai 2000
I've read the Bible and probably HUNDREDS of Bible studies, commentaries, inspirational works, etc. But Yancey's book showed me a facet of God's infinite love that I'd never fully understood.
Grace is something we can never ever earn - it is God's gift to us. There is nothing we can do to make God love us less and there is nothing we can do to make God love us more. We are all honored guests at our Father's table. God has a place for each of us. I am the one Jesus (and God) loves. The cross and only the cross put to end for all time the law of eternal consequences.
These are just a few of the pearls I've gleaned and readily remember from Yancey's wonderful book.
This book is so rich and so filled with inspiration and insight, you can't read it all at one time. I'd read a few pages, think about it, read the same pages again, think some more, APPLY the truths to my life - saw results, read some more, thought about it some more...and on and on it went.
GOSPEL means "good news" and Yancey's book "What's so amazing about Grace" is filled with good news. And it will change you and change your life and open your eyes to see just what a joy it is to be known as a child of God. It is all good news.
By the way, my other two books - if I were stranded on a desert isle - would be [1]The Amplified Bible, [2]Science and Health with key to the Scriptures and [3]"What's so Amazing about Grace." Those three would keep me busy for a long time.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Hope For The Religiously Un-Correct, 24. August 1998
Von 
For anyone with a love-hate relationship with the Evangelical Church (I know I'm not alone), this is a cup of cold water. There's a lot of us who have grown tired and even sick of all the tap dancing expected in order to be "religiously correct" and "Grade-A Church Approved." While the dancing goes on, many of us wrestle with an inner conviction that much of what we see and experience in the Church today not only misrepresents, but actually abuses Jesus and His message, slamming the door of heaven shut in the face of anyone who does not dance quite right. This book brings encouragement to those who wish they could resist the pressure to settle for religious correctness and fitting in rather than seeking authentic Christlikeness. It brings comfort that such inner disquietude is not the product of spiritual immaturity, carnalness, or satanic suggestion, but, rather, whispers of Divine longing for an authentic Church, dispensing Christ's redemptive love to the world. A prophetic message, especially to North American Evangelicals, against the errors of the Pharisees--which we may not be as far removed from as we'd like to think we are. Thank you, Phillip Yancey, for bringing courage to those of us who want to quit the tap-dancing.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Everyone Needs to Read This, 9. Mai 2000
Von 
This could be one of the best "faith" books I have ever read. In a day and age where platitudes reign in sermons, Yancey is able to drill down into the core purpose of Christianity. His perspective on grace is refreshing, eye opening, and portrayed in way that entices you to want to learn more. One of my favorite excerpts which is the real premise of the book: Mark Twain used to talk about people who were "good in the worst sense of the word," a phrase that, for many, captures the reputation of Christians today. Recently, I have been asking a qustion of strangers when I strike up a conversation. "When I say the words 'evangelical Christian' what comes to mind?" In reply, mostly I hear political descriptions: of strident pro-life activists, or gay-rights opponents, or proposals for censoring the Internet. Not once - not once - have I heard a description redolent of grace. Apparently this is not the aroma Christians give off in the world.
...Yet somehow throughout history the church has managed to gain a reputation for its ungrace. As a little English girl prayer, "O God, make the bad people good and the good people nice."
Great book and a must read.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Outstanding! Right On!!! Right ON!!! Right On!!! Read this!!, 5. November 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I just finished "What's so Amazing about Grace?" last night. I've contacted three people so far to suggest this book. As I've heard one minister say, "This may be the best book of the decade, if not the best in the last 50 years." For so long, as a christian, I have struggled with these issues of how little the "christian" community (including myself at times) as a whole demonstrates the Good News. I've have also struggled with calling myself "christian" for what it implies to so many people-- due to much of the "ungrace" demonstrated by many christians and churches. This book tells me I'm not crazing. EVERY christian should read this book, EVERY, especially those involved in church leadership! I believe Phillip Yancey challenges the "church", much like Jesus Christ challenged the people of his time to love, and love boldly. It's refreshing to know that people who may have been wounded by the church, just may be healed after reading this book-- quite possibly that may be everyone in some capacity. Upon finishing the book and wiping the tears from my eyes, all I could think was, "RIGHT ON! RIGHT ON,RIGHT ON! OUTSTANDING!!!"
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