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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Awesome
It has been quite a while that I have read a story which so captivated me. It is quite a revealing book that will make many readers cringe. I like the character development, the fast pace at which the story flows, the setting and the sophisticated but clear plot.
I like the way the author did the narration. The voice is strong and clear. Poetic and fast flowing, one...
Veröffentlicht am 27. Februar 2005 von Monica

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4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Achtung!!!
Ich hatte erwartet, in diesem Roman ginge es um einen Kreis von Frauen die sich in Teheran zusammenfinden, um über Literatur zu diskutieren. Dies ist zwar der Aufhänger, faktisch ist das Buch aber eine Abhandlung über verschiedenste Werke der amerikanischen Klassik. Den Literaturkreis gibt es zwar, die anderen Frauen kommen aber praktisch nie zu Wort, es...
Veröffentlicht am 11. März 2006 von dr_rgne


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4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Achtung!!!, 11. März 2006
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dr_rgne - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)   
Ich hatte erwartet, in diesem Roman ginge es um einen Kreis von Frauen die sich in Teheran zusammenfinden, um über Literatur zu diskutieren. Dies ist zwar der Aufhänger, faktisch ist das Buch aber eine Abhandlung über verschiedenste Werke der amerikanischen Klassik. Den Literaturkreis gibt es zwar, die anderen Frauen kommen aber praktisch nie zu Wort, es dominieren immer die Ansichten der Autorin. Ebenso sind die Einblicke in das Leben im Iran extrem spärlich. Es wird zwar viel darüber gejammert, aber nachvollziehbar wird das kaum, weil einem die Charaktere und das Leben fremd bleiben. Was auch kein Wunder ist, scheint es doch der Autorin primär um amerikanische Literatur zu gehen.
Spätere Kapitel versetzten den Leser in die Zeit unmittelbar nach der islamischen Revolution. Es wird zwar weiterhin amerikanische Literatur diskutiert, aber immerhin wird diese besser mit der realen Situation im Iran verbunden. Diese Teile fand ich dann auch sehr interessant und informativ, weil man eben auch etwas von der damaligen Situation im Iran mitbekommt. Die ersten 70 Seiten würden aber eher in das Nachwort eines der diskutierten Bücher passen, als in einen eigenen Roman.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Awesome, 27. Februar 2005
Von 
It has been quite a while that I have read a story which so captivated me. It is quite a revealing book that will make many readers cringe. I like the character development, the fast pace at which the story flows, the setting and the sophisticated but clear plot.
I like the way the author did the narration. The voice is strong and clear. Poetic and fast flowing, one gets the story easily and has no difficulty relating to the story. I recommend this book to all.
Also recommended: DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE, KITE RUNNER, THE USURPER AND OTHER STORIES
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen the best book i have read in ages, 29. Juli 2008
This book is awesome. The way she narrates her life is unique. i was really impressed and captured by seeing such an educated woman suffering. it is easy to read but it still gots all a good book should aim at...it lets one think about ones own challenges and place in life. furthermore it gives a different view of women living in the middle east. they are not all weak as most people might think, they are not only woman wearing a veil, they are strong individuals with strong characters!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Of Literary Criticism, Repression and Revolutionary Horrors, 8. März 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
This book will appeal most to those who want to understand what it has been like to be a Western educated and liberated woman in Iran since the Iranian revolution began against the shah. If you also enjoy English literary criticism and analysis, you will have a great treat ahead of you. If hearing about injustice and brutality upset you, you will like this book less well.

The format of this book is most unusual. I predict that you will either find the format intriguing or maddening, depending on how flexible you are in your appreciation of new styles. Professor Nafisi writes her memoir of those years in a sort of semi-diary form. The observations are filled with nuance about the people in her life, the nature of her life, her thoughts and how what's going on reflects the concerns of four novelists, Nabokov (especially through Lolita), Fitzgerald (especially through The Great Gatsby), James (especially through Daisy Miller and The Ambassadors), and Austen (especially through Pride and Prejudice). Against this literary and personal backdrop, violent events explode every few pages as the Islamic Republic is established and begins its crackdown on women and dissidents. Later, the Iran-Iraq war provides similar moments of violence.

The literary-real life nexus is related to Professor Nafisi having been an English literature professor in Tehran when the revolution began. At first, she still taught in the university. Later she resigned. Still later, she agreed to return in full Muslim regalia for women. Then, she quit again and began teaching a secret class for her most devoted students in her home.

The book opens with a lyrical description of the home teaching experience in the context of Lolita, which the group was studying. After that section, the book moves back in time and proceeds in chronological fashion through the author's decision to leave Iran to relocate with her family in the United States.

This book taught me many things. First, I had no idea of the degree of repression and oppression that has occurred in Iran. Second, I was intrigued by how Professor Nafisi tried to live a decent, meaningful life in this difficult context. Her life is a good example for all who like to help others. Third, I was impressed by the way she could use student reactions to literature as a way of explaining what their culture and experiences have been like. For instance, her women students usually did not date, but were trying to understand complex relationships between people of the opposite sex who were attracted to one another. There was a difficult experience void to fill. In addition, the more literal male students would associate any immoral action taken by any character as suggesting that the book is immoral and that the author approved of the action . . . even if the character later suffered the direst consequences because of the action. Fourth, our freedom in the United States is vastly more precious than we realize. Reading about what it's like to have a religion running the country is an important lesson that we should all be aware of.

Professor Nafisi is a thoughtful, insightful and caring person. I enjoyed learning about her as well. Many of her students also appealed to me, and I enjoyed finding out how they dealt with their challenges.

Be free!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Of Literary Criticism, Repression and Revolutionary Horrors, 8. März 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
This book will appeal most to those who want to understand what it has been like to be a Western educated and liberated woman in Iran since the Iranian revolution began against the shah. If you also enjoy English literary criticism and analysis, you will have a great treat ahead of you. If hearing about injustice and brutality upset you, you will like this book less well.

The format of this book is most unusual. I predict that you will either find the format intriguing or maddening, depending on how flexible you are in your appreciation of new styles. Professor Nafisi writes her memoir of those years in a sort of semi-diary form. The observations are filled with nuance about the people in her life, the nature of her life, her thoughts and how what's going on reflects the concerns of four novelists, Nabokov (especially through Lolita), Fitzgerald (especially through The Great Gatsby), James (especially through Daisy Miller and The Ambassadors), and Austen (especially through Pride and Prejudice). Against this literary and personal backdrop, violent events explode every few pages as the Islamic Republic is established and begins its crackdown on women and dissidents. Later, the Iran-Iraq war provides similar moments of violence.

The literary-real life nexus is related to Professor Nafisi having been an English literature professor in Tehran when the revolution began. At first, she still taught in the university. Later she resigned. Still later, she agreed to return in full Muslim regalia for women. Then, she quit again and began teaching a secret class for her most devoted students in her home.

The book opens with a lyrical description of the home teaching experience in the context of Lolita, which the group was studying. After that section, the book moves back in time and proceeds in chronological fashion through the author's decision to leave Iran to relocate with her family in the United States.

This book taught me many things. First, I had no idea of the degree of repression and oppression that has occurred in Iran. Second, I was intrigued by how Professor Nafisi tried to live a decent, meaningful life in this difficult context. Her life is a good example for all who like to help others. Third, I was impressed by the way she could use student reactions to literature as a way of explaining what their culture and experiences have been like. For instance, her women students usually did not date, but were trying to understand complex relationships between people of the opposite sex who were attracted to one another. There was a difficult experience void to fill. In addition, the more literal male students would associate any immoral action taken by any character as suggesting that the book is immoral and that the author approved of the action . . . even if the character later suffered the direst consequences because of the action. Fourth, our freedom in the United States is vastly more precious than we realize. Reading about what it's like to have a religion running the country is an important lesson that we should all be aware of.

Professor Nafisi is a thoughtful, insightful and caring person. I enjoyed learning about her as well. Many of her students also appealed to me, and I enjoyed finding out how they dealt with their challenges.

Be free!
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1 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A riveting story, 28. Februar 2005
I have to passion to go for any book that has an unusual but interesting setting. Reading Lolita in Tehran proved to be one of such books. I wasn't disappointed when I read it to the last page. Dwelling in an atmosphere of tyranny which breeds fear, the book talks of dissent in a new political system that was against openness in arts, culture, history and dissent. In the Iran of her times, even western literature was considered anti-revolutionary by the authorities, yet people stayed determined to pay any price to be connected to the rest of the world. War and peace still left the society yearning for freedom, a craving to be free that led to the author's decision to eventually leave Iran with her family to the United States of America.
Also recommended: DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE
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0 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Awesome, 13. Februar 2005
Von 
It has been quite a while that I have read a story which so captivated me. It is quite a revealing book that will make many readers cringe. I like the character development, the fast pace at which the story flows, the setting and the sophisticated but clear plot.
I like the way the author did the narration. The voice is strong and clear. Poetic and fast flowing, one gets the story easily and has no difficulty relating to the story. I recommend this book to all.
Also recommended: DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE, NIGHTMARES ECHO, THE USURPER AND OTHER STORIES
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