Kundenrezensionen


143 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (72)
4 Sterne:
 (29)
3 Sterne:
 (12)
2 Sterne:
 (9)
1 Sterne:
 (21)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Very fun to read, but I'm skeptical of motives...
Fun to read. Talks about the Roswell crash, the spaceship, our ongoing visitations from aliens, abductions, cattle mutilations, CIA/KGB, cold war, Apollo missions, U2 missions, etc.
Ultimately, however, I find that the author lacks credibility. "Spilling the beans" is entirely contradictory to LTC. Coroso's top-secret "need to know" military...
Veröffentlicht am 27. April 2000 von Mmangoman

versus
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Who is Rosewood Woods Productions?
I must agree that The Day After Rosewell had me going. It's a very readable story and almost believable.
I'm not one to resist all arguements just because they may challenge my own view. I have been a skeptic on UFO's before reading this book, and I admit Col. Corso's account is better than a Steven King novel.
I am suspicious though, of his book, which...
Veröffentlicht am 20. April 2000 von Tom Geraghty


‹ Zurück | 1 215 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Very fun to read, but I'm skeptical of motives..., 27. April 2000
Fun to read. Talks about the Roswell crash, the spaceship, our ongoing visitations from aliens, abductions, cattle mutilations, CIA/KGB, cold war, Apollo missions, U2 missions, etc.
Ultimately, however, I find that the author lacks credibility. "Spilling the beans" is entirely contradictory to LTC. Coroso's top-secret "need to know" military personality. By his own admission, Coroso was very skilled in counter-intelligence, misdirection, and deception.
I think this book is counter-intelligence aimed at the American Public for one or all of the following purposes:
1) Strenghten support for defense spending 2) Foster a feeling of dependency on the military 3) Convince the American public that they should not question to closely where defense spending goes. 3) Create a new national enemy now that the Russions threat is minimized.
I even question whether he wrote the book or whether it was a group effort by some military organization and he just put his name on it - as a last patriotic act.
Other things I find suspicious in or about the book include:
1) The author accidentally saw an alien corpse ten years before he became involved in alien technology. What a coincidence.
2) There is no way the information, dates, places, documents in this book could have been compiled without government assistance.
3) Quite a work for an 82-year old man, 1 year away from a heart attack.
4) Given Coroso's description of how the government works, there is no way this book could have been published without the implicit concent of the government and military complex.
5. The aliens had incredibly advance technology including laser weapons, and had malevolent intent. Yet they limited their interference with our space program to buzzing flights and jamming signals. Why didn't they just blow up our satellites one by one as we put them in orbit?
6. Why would the aliens let us land on the moon if they had a base there?
Anyway, fun to read, but I think it is a lot of strategic fiction interwoven with some fact.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Who is Rosewood Woods Productions?, 20. April 2000
I must agree that The Day After Rosewell had me going. It's a very readable story and almost believable.
I'm not one to resist all arguements just because they may challenge my own view. I have been a skeptic on UFO's before reading this book, and I admit Col. Corso's account is better than a Steven King novel.
I am suspicious though, of his book, which testifies to his seeing alien remains while they were enroute as shipment through the US Army, and that he worked to secretly deseminate recovered Alien Spaceship technology to American military contractors. Besides concluding that UFO's have been buzzing the earth, I ask myself what other reasons may have been at work to create this fun book.
The several references in the book to Orson Welles' Holloween radio hoax in 1939(?) made we wonder if this was not a wink to readers, or perhaps an unconscious referance as to what the book is really up to, and what we are being treating to.
One explanation that crossed my mind was that this may have been an old intellegence officer's last work for his country. The book may really be a work of 'dis-informatsia' (Russian word) - a technique of spy organizations used to throw off opponents, or send them down blind alleys hunting for tresures that are not there. Intelligence organs sometimes plant false news articles, stories or books for such a purpose.
Another possiblity is that Corso may actually have written a book about his intellgence career and an account of his persceptive on the history he saw pass during his various assignments. Such a book is actually contained within The Day After Roswell. Perhaps when publishers showed no interest, some ingenious editor showed the way to literary fame and fortune. Corso's work may have then been rewritten to salt in the Roswell story, after paying Corso for his manuscript and the use of his name. Note that the copyright reads: "Rosewood Woods Productions" and not Philip J. Corso. Remember: "There is no such thing as corporate integrity."
I'm sure one of these more reasonable explanations has some merit in understanding this work other than just taking The Day After Roswell at face value --- BUT WAIT, what's that BRIGHT LIGHT OUTSIDE MY WINDOW IN THE NIGHT SKY!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Remarkable, 18. Juni 2000
Von 
James S. MacDuff (Victor, NY) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Colonel Corso's account of alien technology being implemented into mainstream technological R & D is remarkable. My grandmother always thought that a visit by aliens is how we've all this technology today. She wasn't far from the truth.
The crash of legend in the New Mexico desert back in July of 1947 is where this starts. The Colonel gives brief, scattered accounts of the different cast of characters. They all substantiate each other solidly.
Fast forward 14 years: the Colonel is second in command at Army R & D at the Pentagon. Working through his "nut file", he and his boss work covertly to introduce alien technologies recovered in that crash to an unsuspecting world. Nightvision, lasers, the silicon chip, particle beams, and kevlar can be attributed to visitors from another planet.
Five stars. Put this one in your collection.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen A Question of Credibility vs Belief, 7. Februar 2000
Perhaps the most difficult challenge for any individual in this day and age is challenging their own belief systems and paradigms. This is best addressed by considering the process by which we come to believe the things we do. There exist many people who, no matter what evidence they are provided with, are incapable of changing their stance. These 'sheeple', as I prefer to call them, are deeply ensconced in a myopic view of reality that has been spoon-fed to them through mass media, religious dogma, and the Cartesian model for scientific reasoning, to name a few. It is my contention that these bastions of belief are responsible, albiet subtle, for every review of this book that cannot accept the credible nature of Philip J. Corso's disclosures. The Day After Roswell provides a level of detail and credibility that is virtually unimpeachable except by those aforementioned individuals who could not believe the story even if a landing took place on the White House lawn in full daylight. As far as undermining Corso's credibility because of financial gain, rarely are 'first books' money makers, and even if this book did make him 'set for life', that doesn't really mean much considering his age. Additionally, stories such as this would not likely appear on television by virtue of the fact that, if there is indeed a government cover-up, it must be taken into consideration that the mass media is governed by its sanctioning body, the FCC -- a government agency. The Day After Roswell is informative, credible, and plausible, serving not only to shed light on what's really going on, but in view of the negative responses it has recieved, also illustrates the effectiveness of the virtual brainwashing that has closed the minds of so many individuals. This book is a must read unless you are so deeply ensconced in the fantasy that we, as a species, are alone and could not possibly have been visited by a technologically superior species whose emergence greatly precedes our own.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Then what . . . now we know, 28. Januar 2000
THE DAY AFTER ROSWELL is the first 'UFO book' I've ever bothered to read. I guess I'd never really looked upon the whole 'UFO thing' as being all that book-worthy. Granted, I've always seen the subject as an interesting one. Let's face it, thousands of sane, credible people have seen things in the skies that were more than 'probably just Venus', but with the very nature of a UFO being 'unidentified', any book on the subject would have to bring a uniquely informed writer to the table to keep it from being just another speculative exercise on a highly speculative subject. Which brings us to the author, Col. Philip J. Corso. Say what you want about the subject matter of the book, or the tale the good Col. is telling, at least in Col. Corso, the story is coming from a qualified source. A person who would have known.
So what exactly is the story? Well, it isn't the 'UFO agenda' smoking gun the title had me expecting. In fact, it isn't at all what I expected. Whereas I thought the book might be about actual 'EBE's'(extraterrestrial biological entities), where they may have come from or what they might be doing here, the book hardly touches on any of that. What it does touch on is how Col. Corso, from his post within the Army's Research & Development program in the early 1960's, went about farming out bits and pieces of technology from a crashed spacecraft found near Roswell in 1947, into ongoing Defense Department development programs. As he tells his story, it was put upon him not only to think up different weapons applications for each little piece of crash wreckage he had at his disposal, but to also put them in the hands of the right contractor, working on the right projects, while at the same time not letting anyone know where the technology was coming from. Nor could he let any of the competing branches of the military know what he was up to. And it's here, on this level, as the tale of a mild mannered military bureaucrat working against the tense, cloak and dagger backdrop of the cold war, that THE DAY AFTER ROSWELL ultimately worked for me. Basically the story of an ordinary man put into an extraordinary situation.
I did have trouble with a number of things in the book. Like the chance meeting Corso had with his own destiny back at Fort Riley, or the lack of action taken on the 'nut file' by his predecessors at R & D in the 13 years prior to his arrival. And I must say, his account of his involvement in the Cuban Missile Crisis left me feeling like I was watching a Commander McBragg cartoon, yet none of these little problem points really affected the core point of the book. On the overall, I still came away from it with the feeling of. . . . . oh, I don't know . . . . . let's just call it - plausible plausibility. And for a story as way out there as this one, that's not too bad.
Is it the truth? Who knows. But one thing is for sure, something strange did crash outside of Roswell New Mexico in 1947, and it sure as hell wasn't a weather balloon.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1.0 von 5 Sternen How gullible can people be?, 29. Dezember 1999
Von Ein Kunde
This is without a doubt the stupidest book I've read in the past two years. Pseudoscience can be fun in modest doses, but this doesn't even qualify as entertainment. The basic claim is that the major technological developments of the past 50 years, particularly in microchips, lasers, and fiber optics, are a consequence of reverse engineering an alien spaceship that crashed at Roswell.
This claim is insulting to the real engineers and scientists who actually did the work, and didn't need any cheat sheets from bug eyed grays, thank you. The first transistor was developed at Bell Labs at just about the time of the Roswell incident, well before there could have been any time for "alien technology transfer". And it was based upon physical principles that had been discovered in the first few decades of this century. The subsequent development of complete semiconductor circuits on a chip was an inevitable and natural consequence of this early crude invention -- it can be explained fully by the combination of competitive capitalism and some initial seed money from the space program. Likewise lasers and fiber optics have a technological evolutionary history that follows naturally from discoveries in physics early in this century, no miraculous intervention by the space brothers is needed.
Note that the one truly unfathomable property of the alleged UFOs is the one that *hasn't* been reversed engineered and inserted into our technological infrastructure -- a silent propulsion system that uses no jets, propellers, or rockets. If tomorrow the Air Force were to announce a new airplane that works by anti-gravity, I might be willing to give some credence to Corso's book. But when the best he can do is point to technology based on principles fully understandable by a 1930s physicist, Occam's razor requires that we toss his claims into the wastebasket.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1.0 von 5 Sternen If you believe this book, you want to believe to badly., 7. Oktober 1999
I want to believe in other life. That is why I read this book. This book could not come close to convincing me. Actually I believe something could have happened at Roswell but not because of this piece of fiction. Isn't odd how everything has happened to this gentleman? He was everywhere he needed to be to cross paths with this stuff so many times. How he knows what everyone else was thinking and what they believed, including but not limited to the Leader of the Soviet Union? What about the tangets he goes off on like " The CIA, KGB, British Service, and a whole host of other foreign intelligence agencies were loyal to themselves and to the profession first and to their respective governments last." If that was the case when would be being loyal to their respective goverments ever occur? Wouldn't being loyal to their own government invarably infringe on another spi organization. Give me a break!! What about the fact he shows not one shred of evidence, only pictures of himself and of old UFO pictures that everyone has seen and has the ability to obtain. Shouldn't he have had at least something after practically singlehandedly being responsible for all he claims? And in the first edition? I hear they may have been small bits of visuals added to latter additions but why not include all you could in the original "Tell All" book. I will tell you why, because he didn't have anything. Even back to the firefighter that took evidence form the crash site. Over the years the fabric was lost like so many family heirlooms? Give me a break! Would you lose something like that? I think not. This book would have been better off listed under fiction. At least then people could wonder if there wasn't some truth to it. As it is, all the deficiency this book lays out as truth has to make me wonder if it has any thruth at all.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Sensational from scientific and philosophical point of view, 9. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
It is very well written but being technical, I feel that only a person with a basic knowledge of Physics and Boilogy will be able to understand the contents of the most important chapter in the book, namely those describing the space craft, its contents and the aliens.
Though scientific in content, the book is written as a narrative and makes enthralling reading.
It is a pity that Corso could not include photostat copies of the autopsy report on the aliens done at the Walter Reed Hospital, since he admits to having had the originals in his 'nut file'. However this may be due to legal barriers which exist preventing the reproduction of classified documents, in print, even after the lapse of 50 years. The other copies of the declassified documents published have previously been included in other books released in the USA and England. since 1995.
The structure of the spacefraft, its presumed source of energy and the methods by which it may have been flown by the aliens make fascinating reading.
The reverse engineering of lasers, night vision glasses, fibre optics, integrated circuits etc through leading US companies, unkonwn to the scientists involved in the projects, is quite ingenious and credible althought this view may not be popular with individuals who are credited with these discoveries.
Other books published since 1995 by some dons of leading universities in the USA and an officer in the British Ministry of Defence refer to abductions carried out by these so called "Greys" described by Corso, for the purpose of medical experiments and creation of hybrids.
I am sorry that Col. Corso survived only one year, after waiting 50 years to publish this book, which, just may be, one of the most sensational from a scientific and even from a philosophical point of view
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2.0 von 5 Sternen This book was not what I thought it was going to be., 23. Juli 1999
Why are there so many positive ratings for this book? The first 100 pages were good but then it got really boring. After reading further into his book Col. Corso talks in-depth about the history of the circuit chip and the beginning stages of the computer which has no relevance to UFO's. If I wanted to read a book about the development of the computer I would of read the first chapter of my introduction to computers book from college. He does the same in-depth detail crap in the proceeding chapters that has nothing to do with UFO's. Another thing that drove me nuts about this book is his detail description of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Again, if I wanted to re-educate myself on this matter I would of read an American History book.
I do not doubt the existence of extraterrestrial beings but this book does not prove to me their existence anymore than what I already know. Credibility of Col. Corso? I don't doubt that he was a high ranking official but I question his story as being the truth. He talks a lot about "disinformation" and how it was used as a strategy of war in the intelligence operations. THINK PEOPLE, THIS BOOK IS WHAT HE WANTS US AND OTHER COUNTRIES TO THINK. I wouldn't doubt that this book was part of the plan that he and Gen.Trudeau created when they both work together. I can hear Gen. Trudeau telling Corso in their final days "Well Phil, in forty years from now you will publish a book about this disinformation to continue our counter-intelligence plan for years to come so that other countries will still see us as being the cutting-edge of a technological government."
The title of this book was totally misleading. I thought that it would be a book that went in-depth about Roswell and how the government covered it up. It wasn't like that at all. I think a better title for his book would have been "American History and Technology".
I think that Col. Corso was just plain paranoid who was obsessed with his career in the military. This book was more about Corso's career than it was about UFO's. Better yet, this book should have been titled "Bibliography: Col. Phil Corso Career in the U.S. Army."
Don't waste your time!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent tale., 3. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Corso has been on the inside, worked with reverse engineering of Alien artafacts while with the DoD. He submitted a sworn deposition in court attesting to the facts in this book for a lawsuit against government secrecy. Brad Steiger writes in Alien Rapture an almost identical history of alien contact, and is the only one who has described in detail the newest advanced technology developed from reverse engineering of alien artifacts that Corso only hints of. Only Corso, Steiger, and Dr. Paul Hill seem to really have inside information and astounding facts of the MJ- 12 coverup. Hill's Unconvential Flying Objects was written from his 30+ years as the NASA UFO investigator. Steiger's Alien Rapture was written with an ex-black program's expert and Area 51 employee. Steiger also included astounding new MJ-12 documents, including the Reagan Charter, and Autopsy report from Roswell. Corso speaks of removable alien lens, as also seen in the government's remake, for disinformation, of the Roswell autopsy film. Steiger's autopsy report was copyrighted before the autopsy film and before Corso started his book. Also the geo organ seen in the alien cadiver is described by Steiger before the film was released. Corso, as does Steiger and his co-author tell that the 'alien autopsy' was made in Lancaster Texas by the government. Knowing that the best lie is the one closest to the truth. Add six fingers to the cadiver and then no-one would believe it. Subtle changes to throw the whole field into confusion. Only these three authors have taken a stand at their own risk. None of these three books are like the myriad of UFO/Alien Contact books out there that ask more questions than they answer. If you want the whole truth and exacting details, then buy all three books. These books will be the new standard for those seeking the truth. Col. Corso has been reassigned to the here-after after an unfortunate and untimely demise. God Bless him and his family.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 215 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen