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am 24. September 2005
Park when between songs he pointed out to the crowd that he had been born here in the Zenith City in a hospital on the side of the hill. This was the second time that Dylan had played Duluth, and the fact that he acknowledged this is the city of his birth was seen as icing on the cake because most of us were surprised he would ever come back here to play. That is because the man born Robert Zimmerman has been running from northern Minnesota pretty much since the day he graduated from Hibbing High School.
The title of "No Direction Home: Bob Dylan" emphasizes that the singer-songwriter was a construct and attempts to chronicle the transformation from Robert Zimmerman to Bob Dylan. The key influence has always been considered to be Woody Guthrie, and Dylan's visit to Guthrie in the hospital is an iconic Sixties vision quest, but this documentary is able to work in many more names into the mix. The connections to the music at any time during the early stages of Dylan's career are only addressed tangentially, but that only underscores that this is not a music appreciation course on Bob Dylan, as much as that would be nice. This is an attempt to preserve the extant record on the first quarter century of Dylan's life, with an emphasize on the five years at the end of that period that represent the most creative and significant portion of his career, aided and abetted by talking heads the likes of Joan Baez, Allen Ginsberg, Liam Clancy, and Al Kooper, who provide memories and retrospective insights (Kooper's story on how he ended up playing the organ on "Like a Rolling Stone" is a testament to serendipity in the music business).
Since Martin Scorsese was basically given 10 hours of film footage to shape into a four-hour documentary, the sense in which he served as "director" of "No Direction Home" would be in laying out the basic structure for film editor David Tedeschi. Obviously the main thrust of the documentary is the chronology of Dylan's life, which mixes archival footage with contemporary interviews. But this narrative plays out against Dylan's 1966 tour of Great Britain, already the focus of D.A. Pennebaker's documentary "Don't Look Back," during which he offended a large segment of his fans by picking up an electric guitar. Night after night Dylan would play an acoustic set to raves from his audience, and then return with a backing band for an electric set. Time and time again you hear audience members scream "Judas" and other insults, while Dylan tells the bad to just play louder. The main narrative and the subtext come together when Dylan shows up at the Newport Folk Festival supported by the Paul Butterfield Blues Band and shocks the world. The U.K. tour kept the wound open and it was the motorcycle accident in the summer of 1966 that turned Dylan into a recluse that adds the exclamation point on the
One of the things that resulted from that decision was the song that "Rolling Stone" magazine picked as the top rock song of all-time, "Like a Rolling Stone," which also happened to be the first single Dylan ever released (it went to #2 on the Billboard charts). This was taken as clear evidence that Dylan was going "commercial," yet even the fans who booed and shouted curses when Dylan came on stage with the Band (nee the Hawks), applauded that one song. The problem was not that Dylan was becoming commercial ("Eve of Destruction" was a #1 song and that did not hurt Barry McGuire's bona fides as a folk rebel), but that for the most part he appeared to be giving up being the voice of his generation. In that regard the biggest slap in the face to those who worshipped him was not "Like a Rolling Stone," with its powerful onslaught of pointed lyrics, but "Mr. Tambourine Man," which we see him performing at a folk song workshop, because that is not a song that is going to send young people to the streets let alone to the barricades.
The interviews done with Dylan are actually the least important part of "No Direction Home," because if there is anything we have learned from listening to Dylan over the past four decades it is to let the music speak for itself. In all of the footage from the first half of the Sixties showing Dylan talking with reporters he repeatedly dodges their questions. They want to know what the songs are about and he refuses to tell them. It might seem like he is waiting for somebody smart enough to pose a question worth answering, but I have to believe he would never play that game. This is a man who insisted he grew up in Gallup, New Mexico rather than admit to being from Hibbing, and his willingness to sit in front of a film camera and talk about his past does not automatically mean increased veracity. I would like to believe that when Dylan talks about the musicians he listened to growing up that he is telling the truth, but I always wary.
What is potentially the most illuminating thing that Dylan says about himself in this four-hour documentary is his insistence that he was never a topical songwriter. If you can wrap your mind about the truth in that obvious lie, which is possible if you keep in mind Dylan's contemporaries on the folk scene in the early Sixties and remember that sometimes words have two meanings, then you can arrive at a better understanding of the truth inherent in Dylan's music. "No Direction Home" does not fully illuminate Bob Dylan, but that impossibility is hardly Scorsese's agenda. Ultimately, Scorsese is making the case for why Dylan should end up getting a Noble Prize for Literature some day soon. The only better way to make the case is to simply listen to the man's music.
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am 12. Oktober 2014
Heb zeer genoten van de dubbel CD die in de eerste plaats voor mijn partner, die een groot Bob Dylan fan is, gekocht werd. Zij was erg blij met de CD's.
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am 11. November 2005
Da macht also mein Lieblingsregisseur eine Doku ueber meinen Lieblingssänger. A perfect match ... sollte man meinen.
Leider erwies sich NO DIRECTION HOME jedoch als recht zwiespältiges Vergnügen.
Gerade TEIL1 hat demjenigen, der sich ein bisschen mit Popgeschichte auskennt wenig zu bieten. Ein pausbäckiger Junge trampt nach New York, Ändert seinen Namen und schummelt sich in die Folk-Szene rein. Bald schreibt er eigene Songs, Blowing dies und Hard Rain das und alle sind geplättet.
Diese Geschichte wurde schon so oft erzaehlt, dass sie mittlerweile zur Allgemeinbildung gehoert. Und dass sich einem voellig unbeleckten Nachgeborenen in einem 5 Sekunden-Clip z.B. die Genialität eines Hank Williams erschliesst, bezweifle ich stark.
Man sieht eine Abfolge angestaubt wirkender Performer und da sticht der (ganz) junge Dylan letztendlich auch nicht besonders heraus. Am aufregendsten sind noch die Doku-Einsprengsel in denen travelling carnivals, oder ganz einfach 50er und 60er Strassenszenen zu sehen sind - real spooky.
TEIL 2 rockt dann schon eher. Hier nähert sich Dylan seinem (elektrischen) Erwachen. Und je enger sich die Reminiszenzen mit den als Leitmotiv verwendeten Konzertausschnitten der legendären 66er Tour verzahnen, desto packender wird das Ganze. (Offenbar können in die Jahre gekommene RockNRoller amüsanter erzählen, als pensionierte Folkies.)
Genau mit dem ersten, elektrischen Auftritt in Newport ist man - BOOOMMMMM - bei einem Sound angekommen, der die Luft heute noch genauso brennen lässt, wie vor 40 Jahren.
Und um das zu hören, braucht mein idealtypischer Nachgeborener absolut NICHTS von dem ganzen Quatsch vorher zu wissen. Die permanente Aktualität dieses unglaublichen Sounds ist so selbstevident, wie bei jedem grossen Kunstwerk.
(... die des ebenso unglaublichen Stylings übrigens auch.)
Wohlgemerkt: Sämtliche Ausschnitte der elektrischen Performances (ob Teil 1 oder 2) sind ABSOLUT FANTASTISCH. Aber für die ist eben - Ehre wem Ehre gebührt - nicht Scorsese, sondern D.A. Pennebaker verantwortlich. Der hat das damals gefilmt und ich frage mich, ob er den 66er-Tour-Film nicht doch lieber hätte selbst machen sollen.
Highlights sind aber auch die grosszügig über drei Stunden verteilten Intervieweinsprengsel mit dem Mr. Dylan von heute. Der gibt so unverstellt und direkt Auskunft über sich, wie man es schon nicht mehr zu hoffen wagte, und erweist sich als ebenso scharfsichtiger, wie humorvoller Kommentator seines eigenen Werdegangs. Aber auch an diesen Interviews war Scorsese nicht persönlich beteiligt. Bleibt die Frage:
Hey Marty, what did you do anyway ?
Es gibt natürlich immer wieder berührende Momente. Aber abgesehen von den oben beschriebenen, verlangt es schon einiges an Geduld und Sitzfleisch, um diese mitzubekommen. Am Ende, als ich die Bonus-Performances angsteuert habe, sind mir übrigens doch noch die Tränen gekommen.
Maria Muldaur singt dort den ziemlich obskuren Dylan Song Lord, Protect My Child. Und wenn das nicht jede/n, die/der sich glücklich genug schätzen darf ein Kind zu haben, umhaut, dann weiss ich auch nicht.
PS: Auch das Entstehungsdatums dieses Songs (1983) liegt bezeichnenderweise weit ausserhalb des von Scorcese vorgegebenen Zeitrahmens.
PPS: Selbst der Titel ist bizarr missraten. Obwohl Marty uns das mit einigem Geschick weiszumachen versucht, war Mr. Dylan in diesen Jahren auf der Suche nach Vielem. Aber sicher nicht nach dem Weg back home.
... ich glaub ich sollte mir mal wieder GOOD FELLAS rausziehen, um nicht vom Glauben abzufallen, hmm ?
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am 24. Oktober 2005
I was out on the deck cooking a steak and listening to Bob Dylan playing down in Bayfront Park when between songs he pointed out to the crowd that he had been born here in the Zenith City in a hospital on the side of the hill. This was the second time that Dylan had played Duluth, and the fact that he acknowledged this is the city of his birth was seen as icing on the cake because most of us were surprised he would ever come back here to play. That is because the man born Robert Zimmerman has been running from northern Minnesota pretty much since the day he graduated from Hibbing High School.
The title of "No Direction Home: Bob Dylan" emphasizes that the singer-songwriter was a construct and attempts to chronicle the transformation from Robert Zimmerman to Bob Dylan. The key influence has always been considered to be Woody Guthrie, and Dylan's visit to Guthrie in the hospital is an iconic Sixties vision quest, but this documentary is able to work in many more names into the mix. The connections to the music at any time during the early stages of Dylan's career are only addressed tangentially, but that only underscores that this is not a music appreciation course on Bob Dylan, as much as that would be nice. This is an attempt to preserve the extant record on the first quarter century of Dylan's life, with an emphasize on the five years at the end of that period that represent the most creative and significant portion of his career, aided and abetted by talking heads the likes of Joan Baez, Allen Ginsberg, Liam Clancy, and Al Kooper, who provide memories and retrospective insights (Kooper's story on how he ended up playing the organ on "Like a Rolling Stone" is a testament to serendipity in the music business).
Since Martin Scorsese was basically given 10 hours of film footage to shape into a four-hour documentary, the sense in which he served as "director" of "No Direction Home" would be in laying out the basic structure for film editor David Tedeschi. Obviously the main thrust of the documentary is the chronology of Dylan's life, which mixes archival footage with contemporary interviews. But this narrative plays out against Dylan's 1966 tour of Great Britain, already the focus of D.A. Pennebaker's documentary "Don't Look Back," during which he offended a large segment of his fans by picking up an electric guitar. Night after night Dylan would play an acoustic set to raves from his audience, and then return with a backing band for an electric set. Time and time again you hear audience members scream "Judas" and other insults, while Dylan tells the bad to just play louder. The main narrative and the subtext come together when Dylan shows up at the Newport Folk Festival supported by the Paul Butterfield Blues Band and shocks the world. The U.K. tour kept the wound open and it was the motorcycle accident in the summer of 1966 that turned Dylan into a recluse that adds the exclamation point on the
One of the things that resulted from that decision was the song that "Rolling Stone" magazine picked as the top rock song of all-time, "Like a Rolling Stone," which also happened to be the first single Dylan ever released (it went to #2 on the Billboard charts). This was taken as clear evidence that Dylan was going "commercial," yet even the fans who booed and shouted curses when Dylan came on stage with the Band (nee the Hawks), applauded that one song. The problem was not that Dylan was becoming commercial ("Eve of Destruction" was a #1 song and that did not hurt Barry McGuire's bona fides as a folk rebel), but that for the most part he appeared to be giving up being the voice of his generation. In that regard the biggest slap in the face to those who worshipped him was not "Like a Rolling Stone," with its powerful onslaught of pointed lyrics, but "Mr. Tambourine Man," which we see him performing at a folk song workshop, because that is not a song that is going to send young people to the streets let alone to the barricades.
The interviews done with Dylan are actually the least important part of "No Direction Home," because if there is anything we have learned from listening to Dylan over the past four decades it is to let the music speak for itself. In all of the footage from the first half of the Sixties showing Dylan talking with reporters he repeatedly dodges their questions. They want to know what the songs are about and he refuses to tell them. It might seem like he is waiting for somebody smart enough to pose a question worth answering, but I have to believe he would never play that game. This is a man who insisted he grew up in Gallup, New Mexico rather than admit to being from Hibbing, and his willingness to sit in front of a film camera and talk about his past does not automatically mean increased veracity. I would like to believe that when Dylan talks about the musicians he listened to growing up that he is telling the truth, but I always wary.
What is potentially the most illuminating thing that Dylan says about himself in this four-hour documentary is his insistence that he was never a topical songwriter. If you can wrap your mind about the truth in that obvious lie, which is possible if you keep in mind Dylan's contemporaries on the folk scene in the early Sixties and remember that sometimes words have two meanings, then you can arrive at a better understanding of the truth inherent in Dylan's music. "No Direction Home" does not fully illuminate Bob Dylan, but that impossibility is hardly Scorsese's agenda. Ultimately, Scorsese is making the case for why Dylan should end up getting a Noble Prize for Literature some day soon. The only better way to make the case is to simply listen to the man's music.
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am 16. September 2009
Alles in allem handelt es sich bei "No Direction Home" um eine solide Doku mit viel Hintergrundmusik und schönen Gesangseinlagen von Dylan und Mitstreitern.
Wer eine vollständige Lebensgeschichte erwartet ist bei diesem Film an der falschen Adresse. Dieses Werk bezieht sich lediglich auf die frühen Jahre Dylans bis zu seinem folgenschweren Motorradunfall 1966, also knapp 25 Jahre seines Lebens. Der Fokus liegt eindeutig auf der musikalischen Reifung des Künstlers und weniger auf seiner charakterlichen. Wer sich schon ein wenig mit Dylan auskennt und das ein oder andere Youtube-Video über sein Leben angeschaut hat wird von dieser Doku nicht vom Hocker gerissen. Es kommen einige Infos hinzu, wie z.B. die persönlichen Eindrücke einiger Wegbereiter, aber nichts was völlig überraschend wäre.

Ein Pluspunkt stellt auf jeden Fall das extra-material da, welches mit Werbesendungen, Gastauftritten und Lifeperformances gespickt ist.

Volle 5 Sterne gibt es von meiner Seite deshalb nicht, weil der gealterte Dylan seine Drogenexzesse und Egotrips (gut sichtbar während seiner 66'er Europa-Tour) aus der Retropersektive in jeder Hinsicht relativiert und nichts dazugelernt zu haben scheint. Bob wird für meinen geschmack zu unkritisch darstellt und fast schon für seine unzulänglichkeiten glorifiziert.
Kein besonders gutes Vorbild für ungeformte Heranwachsende, die womöglich durch die scheinbare coolness des vollgedröhnten Dylan beeindruckt sind und diesem Trugbild nacheifern wollen.
Insgesamt ist mir der charakterliche Aspekt ein wenig zu kurz gekommen, ich hätte gerne mehr über seine Wesenszüge und über Meinungen anderer zu seiner Person erfahren.
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am 16. Oktober 2010
....gegen das Produkt rein Technisch gesehen ist nicht zu meckern.

Inhaltlich eher etwas für sehr eingefleischte Dylan Fans, von M.Scorsese
ist man streng genommen andere Qualität,Ideen,Dokus gewohnt.
Für eingefleischte Fans mag es ja Interessant sein was Pete Seeger über Dylan zu sagen hat, für mich nicht, es ist ganz einfach zu lange langatmig angelegt.

Dagegen kommen die Statements Ausschnitte Dylan /Woody Guthrie zu kurz.
Die DVD aus 2 Scheiben bestehend behandelt auf Scheibe 1 ellenlang genaugenommen zu lange den Werdegang Robert Zimmermans.
Fraglich ist ob man die Entwicklung der Folk Musik bzw die damaligen Hörgewohnheiten in den USA so intensiv behandeln mußte.

Es wechselt zwischen Dylan Interview ,Standbildern alten Videoaufzeichnungen,
Musikaufnahmen von Dylan eigentlich unter ferner liefen.

Manchmal kommt es einem vor bestimmte Sequenzen ..hätte man mit Einem Movie Maker selbst machen können.
Also Bilder mit Musik unterlegt...zb mit windows Movie Maker.
Tatsache ist auch es wirkt zusammen gestöpselt...fatal sind bestimmte Sequencen und Video Ausschnitte , ähnlich sind sie bei You Tube zu finden....dort gibt es auch Qualitätmäßig Ton /Musik/ kaum brauchbares von Robert Zimmermann.
Die zweite Scheibe habe ich mir vorläufig erst mal gar nicht angeschaut/gehört.
Der Preis des ganzen ist ok.
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