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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen One of the best books I've ever read.
I am writing this review when I have just finished reading the book about 1hour ago. I have the feeling that if I don't write this now, I'll never get down to writing it and it will simply be forgotten and stuffed away in another part of my memory. (Whoops, am I beginning to sound like Charlie nearing the end?) Which is quite a pity for such a wonderful story.
If I...
Veröffentlicht am 14. Mai 2000 von edmundchong@zdnetmail.com

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Just too long...
A friend told me about this - one of his "all time favorites" - and so I worked through it.

The book starts very well. The idea itself to explore the "becoming" of a human mind is an interesting one and its realization using slight improvements in spelling, grammar, focusing, etc. works very well.

But then it starts to get boring.
There is -...
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5.0 von 5 Sternen One of the best books I've ever read., 14. Mai 2000
I am writing this review when I have just finished reading the book about 1hour ago. I have the feeling that if I don't write this now, I'll never get down to writing it and it will simply be forgotten and stuffed away in another part of my memory. (Whoops, am I beginning to sound like Charlie nearing the end?) Which is quite a pity for such a wonderful story.
If I were to describe the story in one word, that word would be "poignant". This book has aroused my emotions and stimulated my thoughts in the span of what, 2 days? Although it is not to the extent of making me cry (no book has done that to me before), I keep getting this funny tingling sensation at those especially emotional scenes. I have experienced this at least 7 times throughout the reading.
In my opinion, David Keyes did an extremely good job in employing the use of the first person view, journal style writing where the main character, Charlie, narrates the events to the reader. More than once have I marvelled at the way Keyes writes about the range of feelings and emotions that Charlie goes through. Keyes has portrayed them in an extremely realistic manner. I'm willing to bet that for Keyes to have achieved that, he must have thought about how he himself felt in certain situations and applied them to Charlie's character. Why? Because some of the feelings that Keyes describes are almost exactly the same as what I have experienced. That's what makes the story even more grippingly realistic. The darker side of human emotions such as anger, hatred, frustration and fear are shown more in the story. More than halfway through the story I was already feeling that the story was starting to become quite frightening because of its realism. It thoroughly explores the world of human emotions. To all psychology students, don't miss this one.
I think the most prominent theme being discussed throughout the story is that of intelligence. The story questions whether intelligence is really a good thing. Before the operation, we see Charlie Gordon the moron with an I.Q. of 70, the honest, trusting, good-natured and likeable Charlie Gordon. After the operation, we see the super-intelligent Charlie Gordon, highly knowledgeable in many fields, master of 20 languages, and yet arrogant and unable to connect with and relate to ordinary people. He begins to see, but not tolerate the inadequacies of the normal human being. Charlie's only salvation comes from the fact that he once experienced life with an I.Q. of 70. That is why at the end he finally realizes his mistake. He says, "Intelligence and education that hasn't been tempered by human affection isn't worth a damn." This is a contrast to the scientists, Professor Nemur especially, who has the benefit of education but is almost incapable of sensitivity and feeling emotionally. Somebody once told me that there is greed and ambition in this world because of education. That's something worth thinking about.
Hmm...now I've come to the last part: why the Flowers for Algernon is so beautiful. To me, the story is basically about the psychological journey about a man, a man who has lived at the two extremes of intelligence. Some people have commented that the story is a dark and depressing. I disagree. The final part of the story where Charlie is losing his intelligence and he has to face it is indeed heart-wrenching, as we see how he slowly becomes the old Charlie again, and how he has to painfully let go of certain things.
Yes, the story is full of ups and downs, and the downs are indeed more than the ups. In fact, isn't there only one "up" in the story? The part where Charlie finally realizes what intelligence really means, and the Charlie of the present finally learns to live with the Charlie of the past. In my opinion, that is the very pinnacle of the story. He discovers how to truly live life to the fullest, he learns about using intelligence not just for himself, but for the world, and he conquers his fear to experience the joy of love. However short-lived it may be, I feel that it overshadows all other parts of the story, even if he loses everything at the end. Good things cannot last forever, and perhaps that's what makes them even more beautiful. There is true beauty in Charlie's words when he says,
"Alice knows everything about me now, and accepts the fact that we can only be together for a short while...It's painful to think about that, but what we have, I suspect, is more than most people find in a lifetime."
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen PROFOUNDLY MOVING...THOUGHT PROVOKING..., 18. März 2005
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Flowers for Algernon (S.F. Masterworks) (Taschenbuch)
This is a wonderful and highly original novel about a mentally challenged man named Charlie who wanted to be smart. One day, his wish was granted. A group of scientists selected him for an experimental operation which would to raise his intelligence to genius level. Suddenly, Charlie found himself transformed, and life, as he knew it, changed.
His story is told entirely through Charlie's eyes and perceptions in the form of progress reports. The reader actually sees the change in Charlie take place, as his progress reports become more complex, well written, and filled with the angst of personal discovery and growth, as well as with his gradual awareness of his amazing and accelerated intellectual development.
The progress reports are a wonderful contrivance for facilitating the story, and the reader is one with Charlie on his voyage of self-discovery. What happens to Charlie in the long run is profoundly moving and thought provoking. It is no wonder that this author was the recipient of the Nebula Award, which is given by the Science Fiction Writers of America for having written the Best Novel of the Year. This is definitely a book well worth reading and having in one's personal collection. Bravo!
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Just too long..., 21. Januar 2013
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Flowers for Algernon (Kindle Edition)
A friend told me about this - one of his "all time favorites" - and so I worked through it.

The book starts very well. The idea itself to explore the "becoming" of a human mind is an interesting one and its realization using slight improvements in spelling, grammar, focusing, etc. works very well.

But then it starts to get boring.
There is - early - a point were you simply know how the story will end and you just want to get it done. But the author just talks on and on about details, details and some more details. The character re-visits locations from previous chapters without any reason for himself or the story.

Maybe 200 pages less would have been more in this case.

After I finished the book I looked Daniel Keyes up on the net. It says "Flowers for Algernon" had been a short story first.
Go figure.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Herzzerreißende Story, deren Alter ihrer Genialität keinen Abbruch tut, 21. August 2012
Von 
Inhalt

Es geht also um Charlie Gordon, einen zweiunddreißigjährigen Mann mit einem IQ von 68. Er arbeitet in einer Bäckerei als Lieferant und Saubermacher, besucht aber nebenbei auch eine Schule, die geistig behinderten Menschen wie ihm das Lesen und Schreiben beibringt. Dort fällt er durch seinen Fleiß der jungen Lehrerin Alice Kinnian auf, die ihn Dr. Strauss und Prof. Nemur empfiehlt. Diese haben eine Prozedur entwickelt, die den IQ von Lebewesen drastisch steigern kann. Die Prozedur wurde bereits erfolgreich an einer weißen Maus namens Algernon getestet. Die werten Wissenschaftler sind nun der Meinung, dass es an der Zeit ist, zu menschlichen Testsubjekten überzugehen.

Charlies größter Wunsch ist es, klug zu sein. Er tut auch vor der Prozedur schon sein bestes, aber mit seinem IQ kommt er nur bis zu einem gewissen Punkt. Jedoch möchte er seinen Mitarbeitern und seiner Familie, die er schon seit Jahren nicht mehr gesehen hat, beweisen, dass auch er schlau sein kann. Und so hofft er darauf, von den Wissenschaftlern als Testobjekt auserkoren zu werden. Dies geschieht dann auch und der Leser wird auf eine spannende Reise mitgenommen. Während Algernon Charlie zu Anfang noch bei Wettrennen durch Labyrinthe schlägt, überholt Charlie ihn nur allzu bald und findet heraus, dass die Welt um einiges anderes ist, als er sie zuvor wahrgenommen hat.

Einschätzung

Ich bin durch das Lesen einer anderen Geschichte auf dieses Buch gekommen – weil es darin erwähnt wurde. Nachdem ich den Klappentext gelesen hatte, fand ich schon die Idee sehr interessant. Aber es war die erste Seite, die es für mich besiegelte. Ich musste dieses Buch haben! Denn die ersten Sätze trieben mir Tränen in die Augen. (Dazu muss man wissen: Wenn ich etwas extrem genial finde, steigen mir immer Tränen in die Augen). Das gesamte Buch ist nämlich in Form von Berichten gehalten, die Charlie für das Experiment verfassen muss. Und die ersten paar Sätze lesen sich folgendermaßen:

„progris riport 1 martch 3
Dr Strauss says I shoud rite down what I think and remembir and evrey thing that happins to me from now on. I dont no why but he says its importint so they will see if they can use me. I hope they use me becaus Miss Kinnian says maybe they can make me smart. I want to be smart.” S. 1

Die ganze Sache ist einfach herzzerreißend. Charlie ist so ein lieber Kerl, aber versteht viele Dinge um sich herum einfach nicht, weil er nicht kann. Er würde alles dafür geben, um endlich klug zu sein. Vor der Prozedur versteht er das Prinzip von Rohrschachtests nicht und Algernon schlägt ihn jedes Mal, wenn sie gegeneinander im Lösen von Labyrinthen antreten. Nachdem die Prozedur durchgeführt wurde, kann man durch Charlies Berichte langsam mit verfolgen, wie sein IQ steigt. Seine Rechtschreibung und Wortwahl verbessert sich, bis er sich irgendwann so anhört:

„As shocking as it is to discover the truth about men I had respected and looked up to, I guess Burt is right. I must not be too impatient with them. Their ideas and brilliant work made the experiment possible. I’ve got to guard against the natural tendency to look down on them now that I have surpassed them” S.154

Und überholen tut er sie wirklich. Dies ist auch das große Problem an der Sache. Charlie ist irgendwann so klug, dass ihm der Rest der Welt unglaublich dumm vorkommt. Dr. Strauss und Prof. Nemur, die Studenten an der Universität – einfach alle. Auch er, der den Großteil seines Lebens damit verbracht hat, von anderen ausgelacht und missachtet zu werden, ist davor nicht gefeit, sich wie etwas Besseres vorzukommen. Es ist wohl irgendwo menschlich.

Keyes schreibt die Story wunderbar – alles breitet sich vor dem Leser aus und die Storyline macht einfach Sinn. Ich möchte nicht das Ende verraten, aber die Geschichte geht auf die einzige Weise aus, die meiner Meinung nach sinnvoll ist. Es hätte in keine andere Richtung gehen können. Man fühlt unglaublich mit Charlie mit, wenn er langsam erkennt, dass seine Kollegen nicht mit ihm, sondern über ihn lachen. Und man fängt an, ihn nicht mehr besonders gut leiden zu können, wenn er sich zu einem arroganten Genie entwickelt.

Fazit

Das Buch mag schon recht alt sein (Erstveröffentlichung 1966), aber das tut seiner Genialität keinen Abbruch. Ich habe es in einem Rutsch durchgelesen und kann sagen, dass es sich einen Platz in meinen Top 10 verdient hat. 5 von 5 Punkten und Amazing! (CK)
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fantastic, 29. Mai 2000
Von 
Flowers for Algernon brings out the true spirit of humanity and its neverending quest for knowledge and learning. This story is told through fascinating journal entries submitted by a man named Charlie Gordan. These accounts help to give the reader a more personal glimpse at the progress and setbacks he suffers from. Romance is eventually entwined into the plot, carefully drawing out emotions that Charlie has hidden all his life. This novel delves into questions that many have wondered, but that no one has proved: Is it possible to dramatically increase a person's intelligence? If so, is it ethical? Full of subtle suspense and intertwined complexities, it is an awe-inspiring read. It tugs at the heart strings and continues to do so long after the last page has been turned!
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Flowers For Algernon; The Real Deal, 10. Dezember 1999
Von 
lisi (Caracas, Venezuela) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
This novel had the potential to be an excellent book. Unfortunately the author did not use it all. As you start the novel you are refreshed by the reading a new plot which is not already a cliché. This novel is about a young retarded man who is given a chance to increase his intelligence through medical means. And as he takes his risk not only does he become much smarter he discovered secrets in his past. As he's learning to live with himself he becomes arrogant and self-involved And this is were the author lost my interest. I thought the beginning was great but as it developed it started to become repetitive and frustrating. The author had no means of showing Charlie (the main character) what life is really about. He doesn't talk about how one notices the human species characteristics as we grow different they are in real life than in our heads. He doesn't believe in communication, or in, acceptance (which is very annoying for the reader). You learn to see Charlie become obsessive on problems until you feel like yelling at him. This book was not the greatest, but the beginning does make you think for a while.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen props for Keyes, 30. Mai 2009
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Sehr gutes Buch, regt zum Nachdenken an, wenn man sich darauf einlässt.
Die englische Version lässt sich auch mit mehr oder weniger ausgereiften Gymnasiumsenglischkenntnissen gut lesen, zur Mitte hin wirds etwas komplizierter, aber darum gehts ja schließlich.
Will nicht zuviel verraten, Spoiler in der Rezension nehmen den Spass.
Ich kann das Buch jedem empfehlen, der etwas mehr als platte Er-liebt-sie-nicht-aber-sie-ihn-und-Ex-und-bla-Unterhaltung von seiner Lektüre verlangt.
Ist auch für Science-Fiction-Verächter eine Überlegung wert, der Sci-Fi Anteil ist nur marginal, wenn sich auch die Geschichte darum dreht.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen FOOS FOR THOUGHT..., 28. Dezember 2005
Von 
This is a wonderful and highly original novel about a mentally challenged man named Charlie who wanted to be smart. One day, his wish was granted. A group of scientists selected him for an experimental operation that raised his intelligence to genius level. Suddenly, Charlie found himself transformed, and life, as he knew it, changed.
His story is told entirely through Charlie's eyes and perceptions in the form of progress reports. The reader actually sees the change in Charlie take place, as his progress reports become more complex, well written, and filled with the angst of personal discovery and growth, as well as with his gradual awareness of his amazing and accelerated intellectual development.
The progress reports are a wonderful contrivance for facilitating the story, and the reader is one with Charlie on his voyage of self-discovery. What happens to Charlie in the long run is profoundly moving and thought provoking. It is no wonder that this author was the recipient of the Nebula Award which is given by the Science Fiction Writers of America for having written the Best Novel of the Year. This is definitely a book well worth reading.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen MOVING, EMOTIONAL, 12. Juli 2000
Von 
R. Penola (NYC, NY United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Daniel Keyes' book is at once a compelling fantasy, and heartbreaking, epic love story, written in such fresh, creative prose that it instantly takes the shape of a classic. The story, utterly original in its day, has been ransacked more than a few times in one shape or another (science fiction novels/movies/etc.). Yet this book feels as new as it was when it first appeared. The real human emotional landscape mined here is potent for any reader, because it deals with simple but perplexing questions about being human: how others see you, how you see yourself, smart, not smart, and, in the end, what really matters in life, not to mention matters of ethics, destiny, fate...It is infinitely easy reading, but leaves you with a profound, shake-you-to-your-core passion; an urgent cry. Though the film adaptations and the musical (some of it is actually decent, believe it or not) convey the essential messages of the book, the book, with Charly's elementary language starkly in front of you, packs the greatest wallop.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Superb! Sensitive and Insightful., 26. Juni 2000
Daniel Keyes is a rare talent. I think that few people could tackle a story spanning such breadth and intensity of human emotions and behavior as he has in "Flowers for Algernon."
Charlie is truly a captivating character from start to finish. He never loses his grace and sensitivity towards others -- especially his little furry companion in this wonderful/tragic experiment.
As Charlie's perspective changes through the story we can all see ourselves in the people that he relates to every day. The scientists become as pitifully inadequate as the bakers. It is a reminder to us all to treat everyone with basic human dignity as we would want to be treated.
A precious book well worth re-reading.
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Flowers for Algernon (S.F. Masterworks)
Flowers for Algernon (S.F. Masterworks) von Daniel Keyes (Taschenbuch - 13. Januar 2000)
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