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9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen zum nachdenken
More beschreibt in "Utopia" einen Ort der Harmonie an dem Alles so funktioniert wie es idealerweise "sollte" und die Menschen glücklich sind.
Wenn dieser Ort auch niemals wirklich existiert hat oder je existieren kann(meine Meinung) , regt das Buch doch zum Denken an.
Es werden Möglichkeiten beschrieben, wie man das Leben in Gemeinschaften besser...
Veröffentlicht am 11. Mai 2010 von Michaela Bliem

versus
2 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen A book of opposites
Sir Thomas More tried to integrate his catholic narrowmindedness with a remarkably peculiar sense of humour to present an ideal world. Great ideas which have not lost their relevance in four centuries stand next to pervert dreams of a Orwell-like totarialism. The fact that apparantly nobody knows any longer how to read the book makes the interpretation a battlefield...
Am 1. September 1999 veröffentlicht


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9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen zum nachdenken, 11. Mai 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Penguin Great Ideas) (Taschenbuch)
More beschreibt in "Utopia" einen Ort der Harmonie an dem Alles so funktioniert wie es idealerweise "sollte" und die Menschen glücklich sind.
Wenn dieser Ort auch niemals wirklich existiert hat oder je existieren kann(meine Meinung) , regt das Buch doch zum Denken an.
Es werden Möglichkeiten beschrieben, wie man das Leben in Gemeinschaften besser regeln könnte , ohne dass eine bestimmte Bevölkerungsschicht bevorzugt oder benachteiligt wird.
Jeder leistet seinen Beitrag, jeder hat die Chance auf eine Arbeit die ihm zusagt und Fortbildung, sogar die Gleichberechtigung von Frauen wurde bereits thematisiert, was meines Wissens nach zu More's Zeit bemerkenswert war.

Thomas More kritisiert auch die extreme Fixierung auf Geld die in unserer gesellschaft vorherrscht.
Obwohl das Buch schon ein paar jahrhunderte alt ist (16 Jh), ist es sehr gut auf die heutige Zeit übertragbar, da das materielle Denken über die Jahre leider immer mehr zunimmt.

Der Autor findet zwar nicht für jedes Problem eine (für mich) zufriedenstellende Lösung , aber schließlich ist das Buch eher als Kritik an der Gesellschaft zu sehen und soll aufzeigen wie viel in unserer Welt eigentlich schiefläuft.

Trotz der geringen Seitenanzahl, habe ich für dieses Buch einige Tage gebraucht, da auf jeder Seite so viele Inputs, Denkanstöße, neue Ideen etc. sind, dass man einfach öfters eine Pause machen muss um all die Informationen zu verarbeiten und sich klar zu werden inwiefern man dem ganzen zustimmt.

Für alle die nicht nur unterhalten , sonder zum denken gebracht werden wollen.
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Foundational Text of Western Thought, 16. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Penguin Classics) (Taschenbuch)
Upon his return from Utopia, a colony in the Americas, Raphael Nonsenso describes in detail the culture of the Utopian people to More and a friend. He lays out structures of government, labour, economy, religions, and practices of crime and punishment. In a place like Utopia, which because of More's book we now have instant associations of equality, peace, and so on, it is odd to note that slavery and capital punishment are seen as necessary institutions in Utopia.
From Nonsenso's description, Utopia appears a self-important, isolationist society, but Nonsenso is only too willing to overlook its negative aspects in light of its positives. His outlines almost sound anachronistically like the measured script of a tour guide or a documentary film.
The question is - if Utopia is so great a place, why not serve as Utopia's ambassador to Europe? Can we really buy his explanation that he returned to Europe simply to spread the news of Utopian success? If he is convinced that European cultures are immutable, why bother telling anyone? No society is born complete - even Utopia had to develop - if they can do it, why is Nonsenso so convinced that Europe's nations cannot attain that level of 'perfection'?
More's classic text speaks to us clearly in the present day, as familiar as we are with stories of Utopias gone awry, the most notable being Orwell's "1984" and "Animal Farm" - Absolutely a foundational text.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Fast schon "spannend", 29. Juni 2011
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Kindle Edition)
Das Buch stammt aus der Zeit von Heinrich dem Achten - aber das hier dargestellte, utopische Gesellschaftsmodell ist hochinteressant. In seiner Gesamtheit heute nicht umsetzbar, in einzelnen Aspekten geradezu revolutionär und diskutierbar. Der Text ist gut verständlich, leicht zu lesen.
Leider hat das Buch dazu beigetragen, dass Thomas Morus auf Betreiben seines Könisgs hingerichtet wurde.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A More perfect plan, 31. Januar 2006
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Penguin Classics) (Taschenbuch)
Thomas More, executed by Henry VIII (one of his best friends) for treason, led an illustrious career of politics and letters. Under his friend the King, he served in many capacities - Speaker of the House of Commons, Master of Requests, Privy Councillor, etc. - culminating with the trust of the position of Lord Chancellor, a position in those days matching the prominence (if not the definition) of Prime Minister in these days. More's strong integrity and resolute mind caught the attention of scholars, political and church leaders internationally; it was this same integrity that most likely was his undoing, refusing to assent to the King's divorce and severance of ties binding the English Church with the Roman overlordship of the Pope. Indeed, More was, if not the actual ghostwriter, then certainly an inspiration and editorial aide to the document produced by King Henry VIII against the continental protestants, earning for Henry (and his heirs ever after) the title of Defender of the Faith (historical irony is that this title, most likely not intended to be hereditary, now declares the defense of a faith separated from the one for which the title was bestowed).
While an Ambassador to Flanders, More spent spare time writing this book, 'Utopia'. The very title is a still a by-word in the English language (as well as others) of a state of bliss and peace; it is often used with the context of being unrealistic. 'Utopia' is More's response to and development from Plato's 'Republic', in that it is a framework for a perfect society, or at least perfect according to More's ideas of the time. Penned originally in Latin, 'Utopia' has been translated widely; one of the better translations is by H.V.S. Ogden, in 1949, still reprinted in various editions to this day. Originally published in Latin in 1516, the first English version appeared in 1551, some 16 years after More's death.
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Utopia
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Thomas More writes this as if he were traveling, and meets his friend Peter Giles, who introduces him to Raphael Hythloday, a scholar/traveler with tales to tell.
Hythloday made friends with a prince who outfitted him for a journey. He traveled through deserts and fertile lands. He proceeds to give an account to Giles and More. In an ironic twist, given More's own attachment to Henry VIII, Hythloday states that he doesn't give his information in advice of kings or princes, for to be beholden to them is not a wise thing. He quotes Plato, in saying that unless kings were themselves philosophers, they should never appreciate philosophers.
More argues for public service, which Hythloday rejects as something that other place-seekers will use to bolster their own positions. Then Hythloday makes the startling pronouncement with regard to how a society should be constituted: 'As long as there is property, and while money is the standard of all things, I cannot think that a nation can be governed either justly or happily; not justly, because the best things will fall to the share of the worst men; nor happily, because all things will be divided among a few (and even these are not in all respects happy), the rest being left to the absolutely miserable.'
Hythloday proceeds to give an account of the life of Utopia, where, he says, there are so few laws and so much liberty and equality that virtue is always rewarded, and each person has what he or she needs. He talks about this under the following headings:
Of Their Towns, Particularly of Amaurot
Of Their Magistrates
Of Their Trades, and Manner of Life
Of Their Traffic
Of the Travelling of the Utopians
Of Their Slaves, and of Their Marriages
Of Their Military Discipline
Of the Religions of the Utopians
'Utopia' is a radical document. It anticipates the modern idea of communism, with private property at a minimum; it is generations ahead in the idea of equality of the sexes and freedom of religion. This may seem a remarkable statement from someone who will go to his death supporting the Roman hierarchy, but in historical irony, had religious freedom been respected in England at the time, More would have had nothing to fear.
'Utopia' was a place of education and free inquiry. Again, More's own life models this - travelers from as far away as Constantinople and Venice, visiting More's home in Chelsea, remarked on the incredible sense of knowledge and respect for reason and learning, not just for the men, but also for the women of the household (More's own daughter once impressed Henry VIII with her Latin training so much he was at pains to find something at which he excelled that he could best her at).
At different points throughout the text, More (speaking through Hythloday) jabs in witty and insightful manner the habits of the day - that kings are often more concerned to fill their own coffers than increasing the general wealth of the nation; that courts are designed to be self-serving and self-perpetuating; that liberties are curtailed not for just and reasonable causes, but often for petty personal reasons.
Some of the ideas, however, are not as modern or enlightened as they might seem at first glance. Utopians' freedom of religion exists only in very narrow bounds of reason - they are all monotheists, and while they might identify this deity with the sun or moon or a good person who died long ago, they are not permitted to speak or attempt to convert others to this idea, without risking bondage or death. Not too Utopian after all...
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More was beatified by Leo XIII in 1886 and canonised by Pius XI in 1935 (it is significant to note that Anglican-Roman relations were at a strained point during these times, and the raising of an English saint who rejected the Anglican construct served at least minor political points, something More would have been able to appreciate, if not approve). The official feast day is July 9.
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7 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen We Need More Like This, 21. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Penguin Classics) (Taschenbuch)
This book says it all. It tells us what is wrong with our world by contrasting it to an imagined world at the opposite social extreme to our own more mundane world. Utopia should not be read as a statement of how we should live but as a warning about everything that is wrong in the modern world. It is amazing to see how little we have learnt since this book was written.
This book is as relevant now as when it was written. It remains one of the greatest social comments of the modern world. This should not be the case but perhaps this indicates how the world has developed.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Sehr aktuell, 27. Januar 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Kindle Edition)
Das Buch ist 500 Jahre alt, aber in weiten teilen immer noch sehr aktuell. Der erste Teil ist eine Kritik an der Todesstrafe, dem Adel, Kriegen und anderen Problemen. Im zweiten Teil schildert bzw. entwirft Morus ein utopisches Gesellschaftsbild auf Grundlage von Gemeinschaftseigentum statt Privatbesitz und niedrigen Hierarchien. Sehr lesenswert und inspirierend!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Classical Masterpiece, 1. Oktober 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Penguin Classics) (Taschenbuch)
Utopia is a classic masterpiece that conveys More's vivid imagination of the Island of Utopia. Although most of the characters are fictional, it is intriguing to learn about the true values of European societies during the 16th century, when More actually wrote the book (although many scholars believe that the exact year was 1515). Truthfully, the book is quite easy to understand. All More tries to do is convey his own views of how society should be through Raphael. Moreover, the use of imagery in Book I is quite fascinating, including the constant references to Roman and Greek myths and beliefs. It is also quite remarkable to see that the story begins to be more and more interesting after More and Giles come back from dinner. To make a long story short, I think it is a great book because of the actual time it was written in since most pieces of literature written at that time were either lost or destroyed.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen One man's vision of a perfect world, 2. Juli 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Penguin Classics) (Taschenbuch)
Sir Thomas More's "Utopia" was one of the best books I ever read. Not only a must for philosophers but anyone interested in dreaming for the future. Originally intended for use in the New World in America, "Utopia" details every little thing about this perfect society, including rules during meals, family planning, and even the complete daily schedule. Many of the ideas brought up by "Utopia" are outdated, such as slaves and extreme chauvinism. But, it is written in a somewhat modern language which makes it quite easy to understand. I strongly recommend it.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen it should br for classic people, 29. März 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Utopia (Penguin Classics) (Taschenbuch)
The position of More's "Utopia" is rather like that of the baby in the Jugement of Solomon One school of thought claims it as a Catholic tract in which anything resembling communist propaganda should be interpreted as moral allegory. Another claims it as a politial manifesto, in which all references to religion should be firmly ignored. Both claimants seem more concerned with the rights of ownership than with the work itself, and are quite prepared to chop it in half, or at least to pluck out and cast from they any part of its anatomy that offends them.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A classic text that paved the way for an entire genre, 25. Dezember 1998
More's "Utopia" makes us search for an answer to the question "How SHOULD our society operate?" More's great book was the first attempt to deal with this question in literature, and it opened the flood-gates for hundreds of others in the centuries to follow. Whether More's society is practical is a question of no consequence to its purpose, and thus should not be asked. We can no more criticize More for being impractical in his Utopia than we can berate Homer for being fantasmal in his "Odyssey."
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Utopia (Classics of World Literature)
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