Kundenrezensionen


25 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (20)
4 Sterne:
 (3)
3 Sterne:
 (2)
2 Sterne:    (0)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen as close as you can get to reality ...
"Nothing to envy" tells the stories of 5-6 persons from North Korea who ended up escaping to the South. Barbara Demick interviewed people from one city in North Korea and was thereby able to check the narratives making it very likely that the accounts of the people interviewed are as factual as possible. I am very impressed by the approach: too often we go for the...
Veröffentlicht am 28. Februar 2011 von Kirsten Dierolf

versus
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Stories are good.
Read this book if you want to understand more about life in North Korea, and communism. The book starts really well, but then drifts off in a tabloid news kind of read. The dry tone intensifies especially to the end, and makes the read not that great.
Vor 21 Monaten von Bogdan Mustiata veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen as close as you can get to reality ..., 28. Februar 2011
Von 
Kirsten Dierolf (Friedrichsdorf) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea (Taschenbuch)
"Nothing to envy" tells the stories of 5-6 persons from North Korea who ended up escaping to the South. Barbara Demick interviewed people from one city in North Korea and was thereby able to check the narratives making it very likely that the accounts of the people interviewed are as factual as possible. I am very impressed by the approach: too often we go for the dramatic and emotionally touching effect rather than for intersubjectively agreed narratives (aka "the truth"). Demick also makes a point of mentioning that the people who had the courage to escape from a terrible regime were people who are singleminded and that just this singlemindedness can also pose a problem in South Korean (or any other) society: what is heroism in one context can be stubbornness and a resistance to fit in in another. Apart from these more philosophical learnings, I really appreciated how Demick tells the stories of her informants: respectfully, as truthfully as possible and emotionally compelling. When I read "Nothing to Envy", I had actually wanted to read on a train ride just for a bit after a long day of teaching and had already packed a few DVDs to watch in case I get tired of reading. I never stopped turning pages until I had finished "Nothing to Envy".
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Gute Einblicke in das Alltagsleben, 28. September 2010
Der Journalistin Barbara Demick gelingt es, in diesem Buch sehr gut, dem Leser Eindrücke in das Alltagsleben unterschiedlicher Nordkoreaner, Männer wie Frauen, zu geben und die Schicksale schließlich in deren Flucht nach Südkorea zu beenden. Dies schafft die Autorin durch einen sehr lebhaften, unverblümten und gut lesbaren Stil, der vielen Journalisten zu eigen ist.
Das Buch ist vor allem deshalb empfehlenswert, weil es auch auf seltene Momente wie eine Romanze zwischen zwei jungen Menschen eingeht, wie man sie vielleicht aus
der Zeit des Kalten Krieges kennt oder wie sie viele sogar erlebt haben! Unglaublich berührend und bildhaft beschreibt Demick einzelne Gespräche, die sie mit den tristen Bildern des nordkoreanischen Alltags und dem Machtapparat Kim Jong-Ils umspannt. Natürlich schreibt eine westliche Frau und kein Nordkoreaner selbst diese "Memoiren" nieder, doch gelingt es ihr in ihrer Sprache, Gefühle und Spannung vermitteln. Dieses Buch hat die Qualität eines mitreißenden Romans, ist aber kein Roman.
Besonders lesenswert ist die letzte Phase, auf die sehr wenige Nordkorea-Autoren in ihren Büchern eingehen: Die der Verarbeitung von Erinnerungen und den Problemen einer Integration in die südkoreanische Lebenswelt, die sich grundsätzlich von der Welt, in der die Flüchtlinge aufwuchsen, unterscheidet.

Für alle, die sich für das alltägliche Leben in Nordkorea interessieren, gibt das Buch sicherlich Eindrücke, politische und historische Hintergründe kann man aus anderen Fachbüchern heranziehen!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Startling insight into life in North Korea, 3. November 2011
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea (Taschenbuch)
I thought this was one of the most interesting books I have ever read. It contains a detailed, objective account of life inside this secretive state. The picture near the beginning that shows the darkness that descends over nearly all of the country at dusk is incredible. It's packed full of facts about the ordeals and trials that the common people face. To read that the children only receive presents on "The Great Leader's" birthday and not their own is sad enough but when you get to the part about the detention centres it really is heart breaking. That said, I feel it is important that we know what goes on behind the facade and for that reason this excellently written book should be compulsory reading.

If you like this, I also recommend the peerless Kate Adie's book, "The Kindness of Strangers. The Autobiography". Both made deep and lasting impressions on me.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Stories are good., 6. Juni 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Read this book if you want to understand more about life in North Korea, and communism. The book starts really well, but then drifts off in a tabloid news kind of read. The dry tone intensifies especially to the end, and makes the read not that great.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen A book that will really make you think twice when you think "it can't be all that bad" in North Korea, 23. Juni 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea (Taschenbuch)
It is very difficult for many of us in the comfortable West to really comprehend that life can, in fact, be hell on earth in some places. Can there really be a regime so bent on its own survival that it controls its own people in such a way that the masses end up living like caged animals who are taught what to think, how to act, and whose lives are so predetermined from infancy? North Koreans are not, in fact, robots or brain-washed, but compared to the rest of the world, their lives, horizons and realities are so cruelly limited merely so a small clique of government leaders and their immediate circles will not collapse into total destruction, and in order to maintain this delicately balanced leadership, its people are destined to lives beyond most people's outside its borders can imagination! "Nothing to Envy" is a well-titled book, which if it doesn't make you think differently about your own world and certainly about that of the people of North Korea, then I don't know what will. Well done, Ms. Demick!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Intense insight into how life in North Korea really is!, 15. August 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
I think almost everybody has heard about complete shutout of everything outside of North Korea in North Korea, and I think almost everyone has heard of famines there. I have read several articles about the atrocities going on there, I have even been to the DMZ between North and South Korea, so I've had a glimpse of what's roughly going on there.

What I didn't know, though, is what that exactly meant for the people living there. I had no imagination of their lives and didn't know what complete shutout or famine might mean in real life. This book gives me that insight which makes me understand really how unreal the world is seen in North Korea and how everything is built lies upon lies, and the people aren't even aware of how they suffer.

Very interesting stories, extremely good to read, I can barely lay it down, fascinating, shocking, intense all the way. A must read for EVERYONE.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Genial, packend, informativ, 19. Oktober 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Ich denke die Situation in Nordkorea kennt jeder. Aber bei allen Berichten in Radio, Fernsehen und Co vergisst man doch immer wieder, wie extrem die Lage dort eigentlich war und auch ist. Barbara Demick schafft es, dem Leser das Leben in Nordkorea wirklich gut zu schildern. Das Buch besticht durch seinen sachlichen Schreibstil (ursprünglich wurde der Inhalt ja in der Los Angeles Times veröffentlicht) und die authentischen Augenzeugenberichte von Geflohenen. Da dies die Originalfassung ist, die kein Übersetzer interpretiert hat, bekommt man die Information ungefiltert von der Quelle.

Fazit: Wirklich empfehlenswert für jeden, der sich für Nordkorea interessiert. Ein wunderbares Buch.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Chilling, 21. März 2014
Von 
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea (Taschenbuch)
this book gives you a bonechilling view into a ountry without hope , without real friendship, without any hope
a country where your husband ,wife or even your parents can become your enemy with just 1 spoken word
where death and despair are just one conversation with the wrong person away
Nothing to envy is a good title but a heavy understatement
heavy read but absolutly worth it
you think your life is bad , you have no idea what bad is if you have never read anything about north korea
Eyeopening and a devinitive MUST READ for ever youngster in the first world
this book puts a perspective on how good any life in the first world actually is
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent, 22. Januar 2012
This is just an excellent book. It gives a good insight in daily North Korean lives. That's all I have to say.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


6 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Reise in eine Welt jenseits unserer Vorstellungskraft, 5. Juli 2011
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea (Taschenbuch)
Versuchen Sie einmal, sich vorzustellen, Sie seien in Nordkorea zur Welt gekommen. Wenn Sie im Anschluss daran Barbara Demicks Buch lesen, werden Sie wahrscheinlich ein ähnliches Fazit ziehen wie ich: Was immer Sie sich an Repressalien und Elend auch vorgestellt haben mögen, reicht nicht annähernd an das heran, was Demicks Interviewpartner schildern, denen die Flucht aus Diktator Kim Jong-ils komplett abgeschottetem Reich gelungen ist.

Für ihr 2010 von der BBC mit dem Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction ausgezeichnetes, im Original 300 Seiten starkes Buch hat die US-amerikanische Journalistin Barbara Demick Aussagen von Flüchtlingen zusammengetragen, die ihren Alltag in Nordkorea schildern. Dabei herausgekommen ist ein ungemein facettenreiches Bild mit zahlreichen Details, die den Leser in eine Welt jenseits aller Vorstellungskraft entführen. Es ist eine Welt, in der nichts von dem, was uns selbstverständlich erscheint, selbstverständlicher Teil des Alltags ist - von den vermeintlich einfachsten Annehmlichkeiten wie fließendem Wasser und elektrischem Strom bis hin zur Wahl der Alltagskleidung und der Entscheidung, sein Leben an der Seite eines anderen Menschen zu verbringen. Die erschreckende Erkenntnis: Es gibt keinen Bereich des Lebens, der nicht von Staats wegen streng reglementiert ist. So entpuppt sich etwa die Hauptstadt Pjöngjang als wahrscheinlich größtes Potemkinsches Dorf der Welt mit erschreckenden Defiziten in punkto Infrastruktur - eine städtebauliche Gigantomanie, in der nur handverlesene Parteikader leben dürfen und in der älteren Menschen nahegelegt wird, das Quartier nicht zu verlassen. In Kim Jong-ils Vorzeigestadt passen Alte nichts ins Straßenbild - übrigens ebenso wenig wie unterdurchschnittlich große Menschen, die die Sonne des 21. Jahrhunderts" irgendwann in einer großangelegten Säuberungsaktion hat deportieren lassen.

Mit dem Gedanken, zu heiraten und eine Familie zu gründen, dürfen Nordkoreaner frühestens dann spielen, wenn sie ihre Pflicht gegenüber dem Staat erfüllt haben.
Für Männer bedeutet das unter anderem die Ableistung des Militärdienstes. Der dauert zehn Jahre, während derer praktisch kein Kontakt mit der eigenen Familie möglich ist - Telefone, geschweige denn Rechner mit Internetzugang, gibt es nicht. Die Zustellung von Briefen kann, so sie denn überhaupt möglich ist (und die Postangestellten Briefe nicht winters verbrennen, um sich die Hände zu wärmen), Wochen bis Monate dauern. Strom gibt es, wenn alles klappt, morgens und abends für jeweils eine Stunde. Da auch die Wasserversorgung von der Verfügbarkeit der Elektrizität abhängt, gilt für die Versorgung mit Wasser das Gleiche. Pro Haushalt darf dann allerdings auch nur jeweils ein Stromabnehmer betrieben werden, und mehr als eine einzige 60 Watt-Glühbirne besitzt der durchschnittliche Haushalt ohnehin nicht.

Ein funktionierendes Transportwesen gibt es ebenso wenig - private Kraftfahrzeuge, die über Pjöngjangs sechsspurig ausgebaute Straßen fahren könnten, gibt es schon gar nicht, auch ansonsten ist wenig bis gar nichts los auf Nordkoreas Straßen. Selbst Kranke und Verletzte müssen huckepack oder auf hölzernen Handkarren befördert werden, und am besten bringt man nicht nur den Kranken ins Hospital, sondern auch gleich das, was er dort verzehren könnte, denn die ebenfalls fest in staatlicher Hand befindliche Versorgung mit Lebensmitteln ist ein Kapitel für sich, das auch hartgesottene Leser schlucken lassen dürfte. Wenn, nach verheerenden Hungersnöten Mitte der 90er Jahre, sich die Lage inzwischen etwas gebessert hat, dann, so die zynisch klingende Wahrheit, wohl nicht deswegen, weil die Versorgung besser geworden wäre, sondern weil zwischenzeitlich gut ein Fünftel der ehemals 20 Millionen Kopf zählenden Bevölkerung verhungert ist.

Mindestens ebenso bestürzend wie das physische Elend der Bevölkerung Nordkoreas ist die politische Indoktrination, der sie von Kindesbeinen ausgesetzt ist. Bereits kleinste Kinder werden per unablässiger Gehirnwäsche auf den lieben Führer Kim Jong-il" eingeschworen, übertroffen wird die Verehrung, die man dem Diktator entgegenzubringen hat, allenfalls noch von dem gruseligen Personenkult um dessen Vater Kim Il-sung, den man nach seinem Tode im Juli 1994 zum Präsidenten auf Ewigkeit ausrief. Um nachvollziehen zu können, welchen Stellenwert der tote wie der lebende Diktator für sich im Leben jedes einzelnen Koreaners beanspruchen, muss man begreifen, dass Vater und Sohn von der Propaganda unablässig zu Figuren mit übermenschlichen Fähigkeiten überhöht werden - wem man bereits im Kindergarten täglich einbläut, dass am Tag der Geburt des Staatsoberhauptes über dessen Heimatort nächtens zwei Regenbögen am Himmel erschienen seien, der hat schlicht keine andere Wahl, als die frömmlerischen Legenden zu glauben. Ein Regulativ gibt es nicht, denn vom Rest der Welt ist der gemeine Nordkoreaner so effektiv abgeschirmt, als lebe er nicht nur im übertragenen Sinne hinter dem Mond - selbst die außer Landes produzierten und eigens importierten TV-Geräte empfangen, technischer Voreinstellung sei Dank, nur genau das, was der Untertan auch wirklich sehen soll. Leisten können sich ein Gerät nur wenige, und wer eines kaufen möchte, kann nicht einfach in einen Laden gehen und das Gesparte auf den Tresen blättern, sondern muss vorher die Genehmigung seines Arbeitsvorgesetzten einholen.

Allgegenwärtig sind hingegen die Schriften des lieben, väterlichen Präsidenten Kim Il-sung. Von denen steht in jedem Haushalt ein Exemplar, das zu verkaufen bei Strafe verboten ist. Zudem sind Kim Il-sung und Sohnemann Kim Jong-il qua Porträt in jedem Haushalt vertreten. Das will natürlich täglich abgestaubt sein, und anderer Schmuck darf an der betreffenden Wand auch nicht hängen. Inwieweit den Führerporträts die eingeforderte Reverenz auch tatsächlich erwiesen wird, überprüfen Polizeitrupps, die unangemeldet auf der Matte stehen. Die von Demick interviewten Flüchtlinge berichten darüber hinaus von Fällen, in denen Menschen bei Häuserbränden nur dadurch ums Leben gekommen sind, dass sie versuchten, die Porträtbilder zu retten.

Gewohnt wird in etwa 20 Mann starken Kollektiven, denen jeweils ein durch und durch linientreuer Blockwart ("inminban") vorsteht. Der hat unter anderem die Aufgabe, jede Art von Unmutsbekundung an seinen Vorgesetzten zu melden. Für den Fall, dass die lieben Nachbarn sich allzu schweigsam geben, ist der Blockwart gehalten, entsprechende Steilvorlagen zu liefern, um auf diese Weise eventuelle subversive Elemente hoffentlich doch noch aus der Reserve zu locken. Zudem sind die Wände der winzigen Wohnungen so dünn, dass der Nachbar schnell mitbekommt, was nebenan vor sich geht - selbst in den eigenen vier Wänden kann man sich deshalb schnell um Kopf und Kragen reden.

Einigermaßen unbeobachtet können die junge Frau Mi-ran und ihr Verehrer Jung-san sich nur auf langen nächtlichen Spaziergängen wähnen. Auch die müssen natürlich heimlich stattfinden, denn eigentlich haben die jungen Leute nach Einbruch der Dunkelheit draußen nichts verloren. Ebendiese Dunkelheit aber ist dank der Energiekrise vollkommen genug, um für Dritte quasi unsichtbar zu sein. Dem von der Autorin des Buchs auf Mi-ran und Jung-san getauften Pärchen, dessen tatsächliche Namen die Autorin ebenso verschweigen muss wie die der anderen im Buch auftauchenden Personen, verdankt die übrigens die deutsche Übersetzung des Buchs ihren Titel: "Die Kinogänger von Chongjin" haben sich in Tagen kennen gelernt, als die schwankende Stromversorgung wenigstens noch den gelegentlichen Besuch von Lichtspielhäusern erlaubte (was in denen für Filme laufen, kann sich der geneigte Leser inzwischen sicher an einer Hand abzählen - harmlose Unterhaltung aus dem Ausland ist es jedenfalls nicht). Der in meinen Augen unangemessen lyrisch klingende deutsche Titel weckt Erwartungen, zu deren Erfüllung es haufenweise andere Bücher gibt, und ist gleich in mehrer Hinsicht irreführend.

"Nothing to Envy - Real Lives in North Korea" ist keine koreanische Variante von Dai Sijies überaus empfehlenswertem Roman "Balzac und die kleine chinesische Schneiderin", und die Kinogänger, die es bezeichnenderweise nur im deutschen Titel gibt, sind auch nur zwei von vielen Personen, die Demick in ihrem Buch zu Wort kommen lässt - in meinen Augen stellt der deutsche Titel samt Untertitel (Eine nordkoreanische Liebesgeschichte") einen handfesten Etikettenschwindel dar, der falsche Erwartungen schürt und dem lesenswerten Buch ganz und gar nicht gerecht wird. Der Originaltitel greift übrigens einen Slogan der Kommunistischen Partei Nordkoreas auf - der nämlich behauptet, Nordkoreaner müssten den Rest der Welt um nichts beneiden. Laut Propaganda lebt der nämlich in Verhältnissen, die weitaus elender sind als die in Nordkorea.

R e s ü m e e

Lesern mit Faible für Reisereportagen bzw. für Literatur über fremde Kulturen kann ich Demicks Buch, das intime Einblicke in den Alltag eines von der Außenwelt hermetisch abgeschirmten Landes bietet, nur wärmstens empfehlen. Mit meinem neu hinzugewonnenen Hintergrundwissen werde ich zukünftige Nachrichten über Nordkorea und den Konflikt zwischen Nord- und Südkorea vielleicht noch etwas besser interpretieren können als vor der Lektüre.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea
Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea von Barbara Demick (Taschenbuch - 8. Juli 2010)
EUR 12,20
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen