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8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen E-Commerce 2.0
Chris Anderson, erstwhile author of the "Economist" and now editor of "Wired", continues what Kevin Kelly, his predecessor at "Wired", had begun with "New Rules for the New Economy": to point at significant changes in how information, services, and material things can be marketed with the help of the web and how this will affect the shape of markets.

In a...
Veröffentlicht am 23. September 2006 von Rolf Mueller

versus
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Wieso wird dieses Buch so hoch gelobt?
In diesem Buch wird immer wieder der glückliche Umstand gepriesen, dass durch das Internet aktuell die Möglichkeit besteht unendlich viele Produkte für Kunden bereitzustellen und dass diese Bereitstellung ja kaum was koste, im Gegensatz zum Angebot in einem klassischen Buchladen in dem die angebotenen Bücher aus Platzmangel sorgfältig...
Veröffentlicht am 3. September 2008 von Nara Nadua


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8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen E-Commerce 2.0, 23. September 2006
Von 
Rolf Mueller (Kronshagen, Germany) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Chris Anderson, erstwhile author of the "Economist" and now editor of "Wired", continues what Kevin Kelly, his predecessor at "Wired", had begun with "New Rules for the New Economy": to point at significant changes in how information, services, and material things can be marketed with the help of the web and how this will affect the shape of markets.

In a nutshell, Anderson's story is this: Web 2.0 technologies reduce the cost of finding suppliers who provide goods that are better matched to what buyers would like to have than was possible in conventional markets. This gives small niche suppliers a better chance to link up with buyers. At the same time IT reduces the costs of producing and delivering goods that can be digitized (information, music, video, etc). Together, the two developments greatly enhance the accessibility and sales volume of what used to be hard-to-get niche products.

I think the story that Anderson tells is right. Unfortunately, the book is too long, like many business books whose authors seem to believe that their readers time and attention is virtually free. Nevertheless, for people interested in modern marketing this book is required reading.

RAE Mueller
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14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Wieso wird dieses Buch so hoch gelobt?, 3. September 2008
Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Long Tail: How Endless Choice is Creating Unlimited Demand (Taschenbuch)
In diesem Buch wird immer wieder der glückliche Umstand gepriesen, dass durch das Internet aktuell die Möglichkeit besteht unendlich viele Produkte für Kunden bereitzustellen und dass diese Bereitstellung ja kaum was koste, im Gegensatz zum Angebot in einem klassischen Buchladen in dem die angebotenen Bücher aus Platzmangel sorgfältig ausgewählt werden müssen. Das führe dazu, dass die Nachfrage sich auf eine weitaus größere Produktpalette verteilt, wodurch die sogenannten "Massenprodukte" an Bedeutung verlieren.

Nachdem Sie den vorhergehenden Abschnitt gelesen haben, kennen Sie eigentlich schon den Großteils des Buches, welches aus meiner Sicht nicht viel Neues hervorbringt und das ohnehin Offensichtliche recht einseitig beleuchtet.

Ich persönlich denke wenn es den "long Tail" des Warenangebotes über das Internet nicht gäbe, dann hätte ich dieses Buch vermutlich nie gefunden. Das wäre aus meiner Sicht aber auch nicht besonders schlimm gewesen.
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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen When Variety Costs Little More, People Enjoy Having More of It, 30. Januar 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
When you want to eat ice cream outside your home, do you go to a store that offers only chocolate and vanilla . . . or do you go where there are many more choices? Most people will do the latter. That's the basic point of this book. If you're satisfied with knowing that point, you don't need to read the book. Instead, you could settle for Mr. Anderson's article in the October 2004 issue of Wired.

But if you are like the growing legions of people who enjoy knowing more about the quirks of micro-economics (such as those who were intrigued by The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness), The Long Tail will provide much entertainment.

Let me explain what a long tail is. If you plot the popularity of various products (say, books on Amazon) with the most popular products at the left, the left part of the curve will be very vertical (the head) and there will be a long list of items to the right that will have relatively few sales (the tail). Mr. Anderson's point is that as it becomes economically viable to produce and distribute more low-volume products (such as print-on-demand books and e-books), there will be more items available to purchase at any outlet . . . and the length the tail to the right will grow. As more outlets can afford to make these items available, the thickness of the tail will also grow.

A physical store will only distribute a small percentage of the items, stopping where the offering no longer adds to its targeted rate of profits. An on-line store will have far more items (such as Amazon), appeal to more customers and sell lots of its volume in relatively unpopular items. The author estimates that 25% of Amazon's book sales volume, for instance, comes from outside the 100,000 top selling books.

Here's where Mr. Anderson begins to lose his way: He tries to describe the sociological implications. He sees, for example, a loss of common cultural items of the sort that talking about the Beatles appearing on Ed Sullivan once provided. He imagines a world in which everyone drifts off into various different niches and the size of the head becomes less vertical. While that may be true, it doesn't correctly forecast the amount of commonality in the culture. The sales of any given item over time may well be in both the head and the tail. Or an item could be a sleeper and always be in the tail, but if enough people buy it, the item will become part of the common culture. In addition, some elements of common culture don't appear in sales curves. I'm sure that yesterday's arrests in the alleged plot to bomb a number of airplanes have already become part of the common culture.

I won't go on to point out his other errors. I'm sure you'll notice them for yourself.

The other disappointment was that he doesn't do a very good job of describing strategy choices for product producers. It seems to me that the long tail is simply another argument in favor of intense individual product and service customization of the sort that Dell has been giving us for years in computers and related equipment.

My grade of 3 stars for the book is 5 stars for long-tail trivia and 1 star for sociological and producer analysis.

If you haven't read any of the following books, The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness, I recommend that you read those long before you get around this one. They are much better books about micro-economic implications.
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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen When Variety Costs Little More, People Enjoy Having More of It, 11. August 2006
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
When you want to eat ice cream outside your home, do you go to a store that offers only chocolate and vanilla . . . or do you go where there are many more choices? Most people will do the latter. That's the basic point of this book. If you're satisfied with knowing that point, you don't need to read the book. Instead, you could settle for Mr. Anderson's article in the October 2004 issue of Wired.

But if you are like the growing legions of people who enjoy knowing more about the quirks of micro-economics (such as those who were intrigued by The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness), The Long Tail will provide much entertainment.

Let me explain what a long tail is. If you plot the popularity of various products (say, books on Amazon) with the most popular products at the left, the left part of the curve will be very vertical (the head) and there will be a long list of items to the right that will have relatively few sales (the tail). Mr. Anderson's point is that as it becomes economically viable to produce and distribute more low-volume products (such as print-on-demand books and e-books), there will be more items available to purchase at any outlet . . . and the length the tail to the right will grow. As more outlets can afford to make these items available, the thickness of the tail will also grow.

A physical store will only distribute a small percentage of the items, stopping where the offering no longer adds to its targeted rate of profits. An on-line store will have far more items (such as Amazon), appeal to more customers and sell lots of its volume in relatively unpopular items. The author estimates that 25% of Amazon's book sales volume, for instance, comes from outside the 100,000 top selling books.

Here's where Mr. Anderson begins to lose his way: He tries to describe the sociological implications. He sees, for example, a loss of common cultural items of the sort that talking about the Beatles appearing on Ed Sullivan once provided. He imagines a world in which everyone drifts off into various different niches and the size of the head becomes less vertical. While that may be true, it doesn't correctly forecast the amount of commonality in the culture. The sales of any given item over time may well be in both the head and the tail. Or an item could be a sleeper and always be in the tail, but if enough people buy it, the item will become part of the common culture. In addition, some elements of common culture don't appear in sales curves. I'm sure that yesterday's arrests in the alleged plot to bomb a number of airplanes have already become part of the common culture.

I won't go on to point out his other errors. I'm sure you'll notice them for yourself.

The other disappointment was that he doesn't do a very good job of describing strategy choices for product producers. It seems to me that the long tail is simply another argument in favor of intense individual product and service customization of the sort that Dell has been giving us for years in computers and related equipment.

My grade of 3 stars for the book is 5 stars for long-tail trivia and 1 star for sociological and producer analysis.

If you haven't read any of the following books, The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness, I recommend that you read those long before you get around this one. They are much better books about micro-economic implications.
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4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Das Standardwerk zur Erklärung von Wirkungszusammenhängen im Handel über das Internet, 30. August 2009
Anderson schafft es mit diesem Buch auf jeden Fall die Erwartungen des geneigten Lesers zu trffen, er nach Erklärungen sucht, warum und wie Sortimentsbreite und steigender Abverkauf bzw. Umsatz zusammenhängen. Hier kommt Chis Anderson ganz bestimmt sein mikroökonomischer Hintergrund zu Gute, allerdings beschränkt er sich nicht darauf, das ganze Thema nur theoretisch zu beleuchten, sondern auch "historisch" und mit vielen Praxisbeispielen zu unterfüttern. Somit ist dieses Buch für reine Praktiker oder reine Theoretiker wahrscheinlich Nichts, wer aber die Zusammenhänge verstehen will und danach auch praktisch umsetzen möchte, ist mit diesem Buchabsolut richtig bedient.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen When Variety Costs Little More, People Enjoy Having More of It, 30. Januar 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
When you want to eat ice cream outside your home, do you go to a store that offers only chocolate and vanilla . . . or do you go where there are many more choices? Most people will do the latter. That's the basic point of this book. If you're satisfied with knowing that point, you don't need to read the book. Instead, you could settle for Mr. Anderson's article in the October 2004 issue of Wired.

But if you are like the growing legions of people who enjoy knowing more about the quirks of micro-economics (such as those who were intrigued by The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness), The Long Tail will provide much entertainment.

Let me explain what a long tail is. If you plot the popularity of various products (say, books on Amazon) with the most popular products at the left, the left part of the curve will be very vertical (the head) and there will be a long list of items to the right that will have relatively few sales (the tail). Mr. Anderson's point is that as it becomes economically viable to produce and distribute more low-volume products (such as print-on-demand books and e-books), there will be more items available to purchase at any outlet . . . and the length the tail to the right will grow. As more outlets can afford to make these items available, the thickness of the tail will also grow.

A physical store will only distribute a small percentage of the items, stopping where the offering no longer adds to its targeted rate of profits. An on-line store will have far more items (such as Amazon), appeal to more customers and sell lots of its volume in relatively unpopular items. The author estimates that 25% of Amazon's book sales volume, for instance, comes from outside the 100,000 top selling books.

Here's where Mr. Anderson begins to lose his way: He tries to describe the sociological implications. He sees, for example, a loss of common cultural items of the sort that talking about the Beatles appearing on Ed Sullivan once provided. He imagines a world in which everyone drifts off into various different niches and the size of the head becomes less vertical. While that may be true, it doesn't correctly forecast the amount of commonality in the culture. The sales of any given item over time may well be in both the head and the tail. Or an item could be a sleeper and always be in the tail, but if enough people buy it, the item will become part of the common culture. In addition, some elements of common culture don't appear in sales curves. I'm sure that yesterday's arrests in the alleged plot to bomb a number of airplanes have already become part of the common culture.

I won't go on to point out his other errors. I'm sure you'll notice them for yourself.

The other disappointment was that he doesn't do a very good job of describing strategy choices for product producers. It seems to me that the long tail is simply another argument in favor of intense individual product and service customization of the sort that Dell has been giving us for years in computers and related equipment.

My grade of 3 stars for the book is 5 stars for long-tail trivia and 1 star for sociological and producer analysis.

If you haven't read any of the following books, The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness, I recommend that you read those long before you get around this one. They are much better books about micro-economic implications.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen When Variety Costs Little More, People Enjoy Having More of It, 30. Januar 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
When you want to eat ice cream outside your home, do you go to a store that offers only chocolate and vanilla . . . or do you go where there are many more choices? Most people will do the latter. That's the basic point of this book. If you're satisfied with knowing that point, you don't need to read the book. Instead, you could settle for Mr. Anderson's article in the October 2004 issue of Wired.

But if you are like the growing legions of people who enjoy knowing more about the quirks of micro-economics (such as those who were intrigued by The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness), The Long Tail will provide much entertainment.

Let me explain what a long tail is. If you plot the popularity of various products (say, books on Amazon) with the most popular products at the left, the left part of the curve will be very vertical (the head) and there will be a long list of items to the right that will have relatively few sales (the tail). Mr. Anderson's point is that as it becomes economically viable to produce and distribute more low-volume products (such as print-on-demand books and e-books), there will be more items available to purchase at any outlet . . . and the length the tail to the right will grow. As more outlets can afford to make these items available, the thickness of the tail will also grow.

A physical store will only distribute a small percentage of the items, stopping where the offering no longer adds to its targeted rate of profits. An on-line store will have far more items (such as Amazon), appeal to more customers and sell lots of its volume in relatively unpopular items. The author estimates that 25% of Amazon's book sales volume, for instance, comes from outside the 100,000 top selling books.

Here's where Mr. Anderson begins to lose his way: He tries to describe the sociological implications. He sees, for example, a loss of common cultural items of the sort that talking about the Beatles appearing on Ed Sullivan once provided. He imagines a world in which everyone drifts off into various different niches and the size of the head becomes less vertical. While that may be true, it doesn't correctly forecast the amount of commonality in the culture. The sales of any given item over time may well be in both the head and the tail. Or an item could be a sleeper and always be in the tail, but if enough people buy it, the item will become part of the common culture. In addition, some elements of common culture don't appear in sales curves. I'm sure that yesterday's arrests in the alleged plot to bomb a number of airplanes have already become part of the common culture.

I won't go on to point out his other errors. I'm sure you'll notice them for yourself.

The other disappointment was that he doesn't do a very good job of describing strategy choices for product producers. It seems to me that the long tail is simply another argument in favor of intense individual product and service customization of the sort that Dell has been giving us for years in computers and related equipment.

My grade of 3 stars for the book is 5 stars for long-tail trivia and 1 star for sociological and producer analysis.

If you haven't read any of the following books, The Tipping Point, Freakonomics and Fooled by Randomness, I recommend that you read those long before you get around this one. They are much better books about micro-economic implications.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A great book to read!!!, 1. Juli 2013
Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Anderson has a very interesting writing style which captures your attention! It is a "must" for every entrepreneur.... it changes the way you feel, act and think about the web! Has a lot of real examples, making the theory easy to understand.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Empfehlenswert für alle angehenden Entrepreneure, 20. Januar 2012
Das Buch beschreibt sehr gut anhand von Beispielen, wie sich mit Hilfe des Long Tail Geschäftsmodelle entwickeln lassen. Vor allem für angehende Entrepreneure im Internet kann ich dieses Buch nur empfehlen.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen An intriguing and insightful book, 6. April 2011
Von 
Dr. Bojan Tunguz (Indiana, USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Chris Anderson is an editor-in-chief of the Wired magazine, and the eponymous article 'The Long Tail' appeared in that magazine a couple of years ago. This has been one of the most influential and read articles about the 'new economy', and rightfully so. In a few succinct principles it describes and explains the essential aspect of the several new successful business models, including Google, Amazon, eBay, Netflix, to name just a few. The basic mechanisms behind the model, however, have been around for a long time, but the advent of the Internet has spurred it on to previously unimaginable successes. This book builds on the arguments from the original article, and adds the material from Chris's blog. It's highly informative, yet eminently accessible and readable. A warning is in order, however: after reading the book you might start seeing long tails in all sorts of places. Consider yourself warned.
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The Long Tail: How Endless Choice is Creating Unlimited Demand
The Long Tail: How Endless Choice is Creating Unlimited Demand von Chris Anderson (Taschenbuch - 3. Mai 2007)
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