Kundenrezensionen


277 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (182)
4 Sterne:
 (44)
3 Sterne:
 (20)
2 Sterne:
 (14)
1 Sterne:
 (17)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


15 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The way out of the rat race
The authors Robert T. Kiyosaki and Sharon L. Lechter describe in their book "Rich Dad Poor Dad" how everybody can make as much money as he or she needs. Showing examples of their own lifes, they intend to awaken the reader's financial genius.
Actually, they teach the reader the principle rules of making money to which the rich people already obey. Among...
Veröffentlicht am 25. September 2005 von Andrea Klee

versus
11 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Nice to read, however not reveiling great new ideas
The very best about this book is it's bringing to mind what you always knew. Investing in assets rather than spending your money rightaway makes you probably more wealthy. This is not a stunning surprise. What's maybe new to some people is the fact that buying a house is not buying an asset. Nevertheless, as an accountant I should know the difference and so should his...
Am 24. Februar 2002 veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 228 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

15 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The way out of the rat race, 25. September 2005
Von 
Andrea Klee (Mainz, Deutschland) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
The authors Robert T. Kiyosaki and Sharon L. Lechter describe in their book "Rich Dad Poor Dad" how everybody can make as much money as he or she needs. Showing examples of their own lifes, they intend to awaken the reader's financial genius.
Actually, they teach the reader the principle rules of making money to which the rich people already obey. Among those chief rules are for instance "The rich don't work for money", "Mind your own business", "The rich invent money" and "Work to learn - don't work for money".
Moreover, the authors explain all these rules and give examples about how someone can put them into real action. For those people, who don't know how to start their financial education, they have written chapters about how to overcome obstacles and how to start.
The only problem which could arise for people from other countries outside the United States is that the laws about real estate and stock exchange might be different. Therefore, readers from these countries obviously have to think of news ways to get out of the rat race which means to become financially independent.
In conclusion, the book encourages the reader to make money in order to attain wealth. However, the authors state that the usual way of working hard, paying taxes and saving money in a secure way at the bank doesn't lead to a fortune. They show many ideas about how every single person can overtake his or her financial responsibility and let the money work for him or her.
This is definitively one of those books about making money that everybody should read in addition to recieving a good education.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Gute Denkanstösse, aber kritisch lesen und nicht alles glauben bitte., 21. Januar 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids about Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Taschenbuch)
Das Buch liefert eindeutig gute Denkanstösse, wenn es darum geht wie man mit Geld umgeht und es sinnvoll investiert.

Kiyosaki beleuchtet positiv gesagt seine Theorien von verschiedenen Seiten.. negativ gesagt wiederholt er sich tausendfach...

Seine Behauptungen, wie dass jeder reich werden könne oder dass Bildung nicht notwendig sei um "reich" zu werden, reichen von mutig und visionär bis unüberlegt und gefährlich.

Wenn man den Nachrichten glaubt, dass er bankrott sei und sein Geld nur mit seinen Seminaren verdient statt mit seiner Firma, lässt das seine Glaubwürdigkeit in den Keller sinken..

FAZIT: Gute Denkanstösse, aber kritisch lesen und nicht alles glauben bitte.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


11 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Nice to read, however not reveiling great new ideas, 24. Februar 2002
Von Ein Kunde
The very best about this book is it's bringing to mind what you always knew. Investing in assets rather than spending your money rightaway makes you probably more wealthy. This is not a stunning surprise. What's maybe new to some people is the fact that buying a house is not buying an asset. Nevertheless, as an accountant I should know the difference and so should his co-author.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Salary bug? Wake up call, but here is my opinion why things are not so juicy, 15. Oktober 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids about Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Taschenbuch)
Hello,
The book obviously is a sales monster and Mr Kiyosaki hit the sweet spot in revealing some secrets that will not be taught in school. (Maybe not taught for reason: Education first...)

Like:

- Quick and clear introduction to value of money, assets, budgeting, etc.
People should learn more about it. I know so so so many folks who are busy and stuck with day to day jobs (no matter what level: low or hightech) so they are not in control of planning their pennies. But it is also with caution, you have to be very careful what you are doing with your $$$, there are emotions, etc.

- House as liability, very eye-opening.

- Nicely explained rich dad vs poor dad (Later on calls him educated dad, more respectful indeed.)

- It is extremely helpful to see the concept in little charts, which will be eye-opening to many readers. Of course the concepts of salary, ins/outs, assets, liabilities, etc.

- Both dad's give many helpful ways of thinking about things, and the reader can learn a lot from this presentation. It is indeed true that one should collect experiences (e.g. internships in young years for a small wage please) in different sectors, different people, different worlds, so that evaluation is possible based on what has been learnt (advice from rich dad). But also educated dad is very right in talking about having a decent paying position. I would say educated dad just took no risks, not bad, but no learning of course.

Questions / bug:

- I did some math, and there must a be a mistake on page 120, where Kiyosaki apparently earned some $49k in 1969. If you do the maths, this means by today (inflation corrected) this is something like $300k for 7 months? Sorry, not possible. Check for 1969 data reveals some average US-wage in the area of $8-5k, hence I believe it should read $4,900.

Dislike:

- Kiyosaki clearly points out the housing market and assets in terms of stocks, bonds, etc.

Let me tell you, this does not work for everybody or in fact only very few people and it is with luck. With the 2013 Nobel Prize in Economics (just released!), you can read yourself about Mr Shiller, who is himself the authority for predicting bubbles/crashes and hence today it is very difficult. Especially the housing marked in your county, country might have just crashed (e.g. Florida) or is going into a new bubble mode (London...) or, based on current financial market conditions it is unclear what comes next.
If you search Google for Mr Shiller housing bubble you will learn your lesson. Or search Forbes.com "Rich Neighborhoods Riddled With Foreclosures". I know that HI is the most desirable place to be in the US and I believe that Mr Kiyosaki knew how to make his fortune.

- Kiyosaki basically points out that his wife is driving a cool Mercedes, which she bought from invested money.
Now seriously, showing off in a Mercs is really something you are not going to do. You actually drive a Volkswagen if you are rich (Zuckerberg). I see many women driving their SUVs down the road, ridic, or a sign of fear passing by? The head engineer of the Ranger Rover never understood this. Why? Of course he is an engineer, which brings me to the next point...

- Poor/Educated dad is not the way to be rich. I would not be so sure about that.
This is an old fashioned model that would last until the release of 56k modems, when human knowledge started to exponentially grow and in return you are richer in your head every single day, e.g. roughly knowing about when this Mercs will fail (at milage x) and can do something about it without having risked a penny. Basically saved. Maybe re-invested by education. You can drive your Mercs easily without headache if you are sitting comfortable on $10M :)

Back to education: Education is THE WAY. There is NO other way for 95%. Wasn't it Prince William recently completing his helicopter pilot training for the RAF or how about the many Oxbridge students? Would they need to study, really? But beware the traps: Student loans, job perspectives, high specialisation (-> unions; loss of potential jobs due to over-education) etc.
But Mr Kiyosaki is very right: Many people are not financially/mathematically trained and once they add up on their salary, the next fancy car can come. As we all know, there is a car for every budget waiting. Particular if you are unhappy and need to compensate.

- Lot of discussion and talking about assets, but you will not find this book helpful in finding what can be an asset (expect if you realise the book itself is an asset of Mr Kiyosaki)

Conclusion:

The book is very stimulating. I am thankful to Mr Kiyosaki. Everybody should read this book or discuss it.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Best Book to Read First When You Start Investing!, 21. Juli 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Rich Dad, Poor Dad (Taschenbuch)
I get hundreds of e-mails a year from new investors who want to know how to get started on a profitable path. I always tell them to begin their reading list with Rich Dad, Poor Dad. Then I tell them to go on to Cash Flow Quadrant. Even if you are an experienced investor, there are important lessons here that you may not yet be following. Take a look!

The title of this book is a little misleading. I thought that this was going to be a survey-based study of millionaire parents versus nonmillionaire parents. My mistake! Actually, the premise is more personal and intersting than that. Mr. Robert Kiyosaki compares the financial and career advice (study hard, get lots of education, go the for secure job) from his poor Ph.D father with the advice the 8th grade drop-out rich father of his friend, Mike, gave him (get your money to work for you, become financially literate, develop your own business and investment opportunities, learn a little of a lot of things, use corporations and tax breaks to reinvest more into cash producing assets, and work at what you enjoy). The story is wonderfully told, and one worth passing along to your children and grandchildren.

For those who don't understand why this is good advice, Sharon Lechter has done a nice job of creating schematics to show how cash flows can grow or dwindle, based on how you allocate your income. This is the simplest effective explanation of the point of cash compounding based on its application for all of a person's spending that I have seen. Although I am good at math, I suspect that people who are not good at math will get the point, as well.

The main difference between this book and the typical investment books is that it provides some tangible sense of why cash flow producing real estate does you more good than owning your own home. With real estate net worth at an all-time low versus the stock market net worth in the aveage household and interest rates soaring, we are probably approaching a superb time to be doing some low-cost real estate investing. Every other investment book will be all about stocks, and ignore real estate.

Naturally, I fell in love with the book when I realized that the authors shared my philosophy of overcoming 'stalled' thinking. There is an excellent chapter on stalls related to fears of losing money, behaving differently than others, and so forth that most people have about money. The stallbusting advice is sound. In fact, this is probably the best chapter in the book.

Whether you think you need this book or not, read it anyway. You'll probably get a few ideas. For sure, you'll become much more adept at formulating the advice you pass along to younger people. Also, you'll have found a good book to help those you care about become much more financially savvy and effective.

Invest, build your after-tax cash flows, reinvest, and grow rich!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Motivates further research into personal investment, 23. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
I am a student at the University of Western Australia. AsiaWeek gave the university an overall ranking of 26 amongst all the universities in the Asia-Pacific region (Tokyo University came out on top). I'm studying a combined Commerce/Mechanical Engineering degree and expect to graduate mid next year with First Class honours in engineering. I've only recently read "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" and am pleased to be able to share my opinions about it with so many people. The value of the book resides in its ability to impart on to the reader a certain orientation about the way in which money, as a responsible adult, can be viewed. As someone who is yet to commence professional work myself, the book provides some valuable insights as to the various reflections one has on the nature of work and money once careers begin and ladders are climbed. It's disquieting reading that those who are driven enough to gain professional success at a high level in a corporation may fall short of their financial goals. I have held the view that if you manage to graduate with excellent grades and secure a position with an elite firm, pretty much you'll be set for life. Not so, as Kioysaki strongly advocates: it is essential that one develops an ability to manage their personal finances too. Thus, seeing money in a new light has proven to be the most valuable lesson and it has motivated me to read further about specifics. However, some of the things I didn't like about the book were: * a large emphasis on starting up your own business. (Do you know how tough it is to do that? 99 out of 100 such ventures don't last for more than ten years). * not enough emphasis on encouraging kids to study hard at school. Kiyosaki quotes Gates, Ford, and Morgan, but how many people of such calibre have existed through the years? Not many. Going to school represents the "best-chance" way of at least getting a decent job (a stepping stone to building your asset base ?) * a bias towards "best-seller" literature.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


44 von 55 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen not much value, 1. August 2000
Von Ein Kunde
I fail to understand all the praise for this book. All of his books make just one basic point "you should let your money work for you by investing wisely, don't just rely on your salary". Do you need to read 200 page books to understand this point? There is no practical actionable advice for the novice investor, just oft repeated principles reiterated many times using his rich dad.
Another thing that is irritating is the fact that he keeps repeating one and the same thing like going to school is not very useful etc.
You wil learn a lot more about investing from other more focused books and websites like motley fool, morning star etc. Don't waste your money on this book.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Reich werden kann man schlecht aus Büchern lernen, 22. Dezember 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids about Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Taschenbuch)
Die Kernaussage von Robert Kiyosaki läßt sich recht schnell zusammenfassen:
Schaffe Investments und vermeide Verbindlichkeiten. Diese Thematik wiederholt sich eigentlich ständig in dem Buch. Robert Kiyosaki scheint ein großer Freund von Immobilien und auch Aktien zu sein. Nach eigener Aussage haben ihm diese Anlageformen erheblichen Reichtum eingebracht. Konkrete Handelsempfehlungen, bzw. Auskünfte zu Handelsansätzen gibt er allerdings nicht.
Manchmal bekommt man den Eindruck, dass alles in was Robert Kiyosaki investiert hat zu Gold wurde. Insgesamt scheint er eh ein Multitalent zu sein, denn nach eigener Aussage war er so ganz nebenbei schon mal Kampfpilot. Und Schiffsoffizier auf einem Tanker auch noch.
Der Autor scheint also eine richtige Ausnahmeerscheinung zu sein. 99% Prozent der Normalbevölkerung dürften allerdings bei der Umsetzung seiner Tipps schnell überfordert sein.
Wirklich viel Neues habe ich nicht entdecken können. Wer sich aber noch gar nicht mit Geld beschäftigt hat, der wird in dem Buch sicherlich ein paar nützlich Tipps finden. Insgesamt war es aber die paar Taler für die Kindle-Ausgabe wert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Good book ... here are some others., 18. November 1999
If you want to know about how to achieve financial independence, your best bet is to hang around people who have, or are in the process of, achieving financial independence. Kiyosaki has hit on a key point -- the reason the rich teach different things to their kids than poor people do is simple: they KNOW those things by experience. A poor person can not teach you how to attain financial independence. All they can teach you is how to be broke. So stop listening to your broke co-workers and your broke neighbors and the broke people at your church or temple and listen to, and read books by, people who have achieved success, and who are focused on the positive possibilities of the future. And have an open mind -- if you aren't wealthy and someone is trying to tell you how to get there, the smartest thing you can do is shut up and listen. (I teach broke people how to leverage the Web to make money -- more than half of them know nothing about it, but tell me everything about why I'm wrong.) Two good books you should read if you liked this one: The Roaring 2000s, by Harry Dent, and "Don't Worry, Make Money," by Richard Carlson.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen This book is an eye opener to all of those who desire money., 13. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
I have read both 'Rich Dad, Poor Dad' and 'Cashflow Quadrant.' Being young and still in college, these two books have taught me how the rich think. As Kiyosaki emphasizes, getting a high paying job after college is not the answer to becoming financially indepent and satisfied. His books unteach the reader everything he/she has learned about money and allows the reader to focus on building wealth the way millionaires do. His books are enlightening, and his method to achieving wealth makes sense logically. After reading 'Millionaire Next Door', I could honestly tell that Kiyosaki's method is the way the truly rich think. 'Millionaire Next Door' simply focuses on frugality and spending as little money as possible. Who wants to enjoy all of their money when they become 60 yeas of age, having spent their prime years living as cheap as possible? Kiyosaki's book is excellent in teaching the common man/woman how to have money work for them and allows them to live life to their fullest. I recommend this book and 'Cashflow Quadrant' as the first two readings for someone seeking financial independence.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 228 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids about Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!
EUR 6,50
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen