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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A spiritual view of the human life cycle
This book blends Hinduism, Buddhism and Christianity into a poignant, comforting embrace for the soul. It is not a novel for the literal reader or the action-seeker. Also, the reader must not be fooled by its simplistic narrative style. It is rich in symbolic import and philosophical vision. I am particularly fond of the novel's philosophy of time--that it does not...
Veröffentlicht am 27. März 1999 von teach2@home.com

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Beautiful and Special
I read this book when I was 19. I am now 51. Having just discovered Amazon Books, I was "surfing" and searching out titles that came to memory. I also read the lyrical version in German in those now distant days, and spent much time looking for "Suleika", or "Zuleika". It brought me great peace of mind at that time, as I had to interrupt...
Am 25. Oktober 1997 veröffentlicht


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5.0 von 5 Sternen A spiritual view of the human life cycle, 27. März 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha (Gebundene Ausgabe)
This book blends Hinduism, Buddhism and Christianity into a poignant, comforting embrace for the soul. It is not a novel for the literal reader or the action-seeker. Also, the reader must not be fooled by its simplistic narrative style. It is rich in symbolic import and philosophical vision. I am particularly fond of the novel's philosophy of time--that it does not exist; and if time does not exist, death is an illusion as well. And while the book's major thought is that no teacher, no doctrine, no religion can afford you wisdom, it pays reverent homage to the valuable mentors in life that help us find our way. No matter how many times I read this novel, I always leave it with a sense of peace and humility.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen All Is Connected, 1. September 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha. (Taschenbuch)
Siddhartha is that most unusual of all stories -- one that follows a character throughout most of his life . . . and describes that life in terms of a spiritual journey. For those who are ready to think about what their spiritual journey can be, Siddhartha will be a revelation. For those who are not yet looking for "enlightenment," the book will seem pecular, odd, and out-of-joint. That's because Hesse was presenting a mystery story, also, for each reader to solve for herself or himself. The mystery is simply to unravel the meaning of life.

As the son of a Brahmin, Siddhartha would naturally have enjoyed access to all of the finest lessons and things of life. Knowing of his natural superiority in many ways, he becomes disenchanted with teachers and his companions. In a burst of independence, he insists on being allowed to leave home to become a wandering Shramana (or Samana, depending on which translation you read). After three years or so, he tires of this as well. Near the end of that part of his life, Siddharta meets Gotama, the Buddha, and admires him greatly. But Siddharta continues to feel that teachers cannot convey the wisdom of what they know. Words are too fragile a vessel for that purpose. He sees a beautiful courtesan and asks her to teach him about love. Thus, Siddhartha begins his third quest for meaning by embracing the ordinary life that most people experience. Eventually, disgusted by this (and he does behave disgustingly), he tires of life. Then, he suddenly reconnects with the Universe, and decides to become a ferryman and learn from the river. In this fourth stage of his life, he comes to develop the wisdom to match the knowledge that direct experiences of the "good" and the "sensual" life have provided to him.

Few will find Siddhartha to be an attractive character until near the end of the book. Hesse is trying to portray his path towards balance and understanding by emphasizing Siddhartha's weaknesses and errors. But, these are mostly errors that all people fall into. Hesse wants us to see that we make too much of any given moment or event. The "all" in a timeless sense is what we should seek for.

There is a wonderful description of what a rock is near the end of the book that is well worth reading, even if you get nothing out of the rest of the story. The "mystery" of what Gotima experiences when he kisses Siddhartha's forehead will provide many interesting questions for each reader to consider.

I recommend that you both listen to this book on tape and read it. Hesse's approach to learning is for us to observe and feel. You will do more of that while listening than by simply reading. I was able to find an unabridged audio tape in our library for my listening. I encourage you to go with an unabridged tape as well. You will get more out of Siddhartha that way. I read the Hilda Rosner translation, and liked it very much.

After you finish listening to and reading the book, I suggest that you think about what you have not yet experienced that would help you get a better sense of life. If you have tried to be a secular person, you could try being a spiritual one. If you have focused on being a parent, you could focus on being a sibling. If you have focused on making money, you could pay attention to giving away your time. And so on. But in each case, give yourself more opportunities to experience and learn from nature. That is Hesse's real message here.

Ommmm
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Beautiful and Special, 25. Oktober 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha (Mondo Folktales) (Hörkassette)
I read this book when I was 19. I am now 51. Having just discovered Amazon Books, I was "surfing" and searching out titles that came to memory. I also read the lyrical version in German in those now distant days, and spent much time looking for "Suleika", or "Zuleika". It brought me great peace of mind at that time, as I had to interrupt my college days in order to enter the Army and go to Vietnam. The book reads like the flowing river, and is in some ways an eternal story of search for meaning in life and realization. Like Sidhartha our search for meaning often ends at the beginning. Ultimately, we return to the basic and simple truths that were there when we were born. Growing up is a kind of struggle. Sidhartha is a story of idealism and virtue that survives ignorance, futility and evil. If in the end, we retain that idealism, our lives can be heroic and our conscience pure. Sometimes, I remember and recall the words: "From Sidhartha to Sidhartha is my coming and my going." It is a book of haunting beauty and depth of meaning. W. H. L./Bellevue
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5.0 von 5 Sternen As close to a life map as it comes, 3. Januar 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha. (Taschenbuch)
I rarely give tens to anything. However, I feel very strongly that this book is a must-read for anyone who feels lost. I read this book last year, as a high school senior, at the suggestion of my English teacher. After wading through a beginning that I thought was somewhat discouraging, I found myself being spoken to on a level that I have never found before. At a time in my life when I felt lost in a whirlwind of forced maturity, I found myself calmed and comforted by a book I thought was just an assignment. Alongside Siddhartha, I found myself learning from my hardships and seeking out my own path. That was a much-needed dose of courage when I had none. Now I find myself in college. My first semester was not what I had long hoped for, and I again feel lost. I find solace in Siddhartha, relearning the lessons that he taught me. Hermann Hesse wrote a masterful book about finding one's path, and by doing so, he showed me the way. In this cynical world, inspiration like that is hard to come by....
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Siddhartha Is A Beautiful Story, Start To Finish, 30. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha (Mondo Folktales) (Hörkassette)
Siddhartha is a beautiful story from start to finish! For the three hours'time the story runs on cassette tape, the listener is treated to a magical journey to the river of life as he or she accompanies Siddhartha, son of a wealthy Brahmin, and his lifelong friend, Govinda, on Siddhartha's search for enlightment. What is more is that there is just as much beauty in finding that one does not need to live a life of material wealth to find true happiness. I also found a certain beauty learning about the Buddhist religion, including nirvana, through Derek Jacobi's mellifluous reading, and that death is not an end to be feared, but rather a beginning to another life--a life in which we are free from pain, hunger, and thirst, because we know that these needs will be met. I would favorably suggest this book to anyone who is a fan of Derek Jacobi's work and wants a relaxing read for the summer months, too.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen You Create Your Own Reality., 12. März 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha. (Taschenbuch)
(Sorry if this review is more about how the book changed my life than about the book itself.
I read this book during my senior year of high school, a time of depression and self-loathing because of the academic pressure and the time-consuming duty of being a editor-in-chielf of yearbook. From this book I learned about suffering and reality, that people either endure their unbearable situation or leave and create a better one. Well I did what Siddhartha has to end suffering: I dropped out of AP Chemistry and enrolled enrolled in a writing class and a social science class, classes that I wanted to be in in first place. Siddhartha starts his journey by leaving home. For me, to a lesser degree than Siddhartha, it was difficult to tell my chemistry teacher that I am not going to be in his class next term. Since I had dropped the class, I had a new look on life; my spirit was up, my heart beated normally again. It was as if a big, black cloud was lifted over me and I could look up and see the sky so clear and bright. The book's influence did not end there. Looking in my life I saw what I have wasted my time pursuing unessential things. Ever since I have returned to religion (which I had neglected for years), avoided eating meat (I'm not a complete vegetarian since I eat meat once or twice a week), I have accepted myself as who I am, I have become less materialistic (I refused to the mall when my parents ask me if I want to go). This is most favorite book.
My teacher said to me that I should read this book again after college and after any major turning points in my life because the book gives you a new perspective on life.
I do not claim that after reading this book people will have a life changing epiphany or go vegetarian, just that this book make you think about growing up and how you had to leave situations which caused you suffering--about your reality. The truth about reality is that you create your own reality.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Intensely thought-provoking and spiritually edifying tale, 1. Oktober 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Overview:
The name "Siddhartha" which is a Sanksrit word is composed as "Siddha" + "Artha", Siddha meaning great achievement or perfectiom and Artha could denote wealth or meaning. All in all it conveys the idea of a man who is a seeker of Truth or even more accurately one who has actually acheived the ultimate wealth of the true meaning (of life). Herman Hesse's Siddhartha is one such soul who was born with an "unquenchable thirst" - in his own words - to know and realize the meaning of life. Even his early childhood years are spent with an acute suspicion and later - a deep belief that there is more to life than just what one sees, eternal Truth beyond the "Maya" or illusory world of sensory and sensual experience, or even differently put, that realization of the True Self is the ultimate goal of a human being.
What the author does is trace his spiritual journey, the years he spent in forests in self-denial practising the Shamana way of seeking the Self, his truly momentous meeting with the Englightened One (Gautama Buddha), and his subsequent conviction thereof that a full immersing experience in the real world is paramount to spiritual ascent, and then his wordly experiences, travails and tragedies, and ultimately of his finding peace and elusive existential bliss.
Synopsis:
Young Siddhartha's intellectual consciousness is uneasy and usatisfied in the mundane mantra-repeating Brahmin community, and the Upanishads unfailingly sow in him the seeds of passion to discover Atman or the Universal soul - knowing which all is known, and to attain Nirvana (in more conventionally popular terms),...The book traces his subsequent leaving of home and chronicles his years spent in self-denial with the Shamanas in the forest. The Shamanas' doctrine teaches that once the senses are conquered and their consciousness is transcended, the True Self can be effectively communicated with. What he did realize from his experiences was that such terrifyingly numbing "flights" from sense and reality did nothing but take him further away from his Self - which he was really seeking.
Siddhartha's time with the Buddha is very important since he (Siddhartha) realizes that True Knowledge cannot be communicated, and that it has to be experienced, that it cannot be taught by a teacher or written down in a book; it has to be a lone spiritual journey undertaken by the individual soul itself. Siddhartha spurns the Buddha's spirited following and embarks very determinedly to immerse himself in worldly experience. Firstly, discovering his sexuality by communing at all levels with Kamala - the courtesan, and then living for several years as a successful businessman and productive member of the community - but with the driving goal to still stay detached from material accretions and achievements, and even from egos and satisfactions derived from pure professional or solely intellectual successes. His gambling tendencies quite adequately highlight this very motivation of his - to stay afloat like a Lotus flower even while thriving in gutter water. But several years of prosperous worldly existence dilutes his intellectual acuity, numbs his senses, breeds tremendous ennui, and leads to a spiraling recrudescence of petty and diluting human emotions. His flight from that comfortable living, his meeting with his son (begottten of Kamala) who he is unable to relate to, and the ensuing heartburn, and his finding of peace and tranquility by the shores of a river, form the rest of this enthralling and thought-provoking tale.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Siddhartha: Life Beyond Words, 27. Juni 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha. (Taschenbuch)
Siddhartha is a rare novel. It has always been there, at least since the twenties; or seventies and eighties, if I were to equate the youth and life of the world with my own formative years. Yet, in spite of this reality, Siddhartha will not really be "there" until you are ready for it. It sure wasn't for me all these years, until a freak recommendation and fortuitous gift from an insighful friend jolted me and my mind wide awake.

Today, I say this with conviction of rare purity: Siddhartha ranks as one of the seminal events of my life.

And having said that, my own attempt at reviewing the book stops in its tracks, somewhat reverentially, somewhat abashedly: it is like I have come upon a mountain spring at thousands of feet above sea level, and the water looks so pure that I don't have the heart to put my own hands in the stream for fear of contaminating it permanently.

However, the following passages from the novel itself come very close to approximating what I have understood--or is it intuited--from this gem of literature:

"Yes, I have had thoughts and knowledge here and there. Sometimes, for an hour or for a day, I have become aware of knowledge, just as one feels life in one's heart. I have had many thoughts, but it would be difficult for me to tell you about them. But this is one thought that has impressed me, Govinda. Wisdom is not communicable. The wisdom which a wise man tries to communicate always sounds foolish.

" ... Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom. One can find it, live it, be fortified by it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it.

" ... But I will say no more about it. Words do not express thoughts very well. They always become a little different immediately they are expressed, a little distorted, a little foolish. And yet it also pleases me and seems right that what is of value and wisdom to one man seems nonsense to another."
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Breath of wisdom in the ignorant world, 28. Februar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha. (Taschenbuch)
In a society obsessed with the concrete heroism found only in action heroes, Siddhartha clears a path of quest for answers in a world where nothing seems to stand by itself anymore. A spiritual hero in quest for Selfhood, the son of Brahmin forsakes the luxuries and comfort of his home to join the wandering Samanas in the forest. Siddhartha's motive to abandon his familiar environment is his hunger for answers; instead of setting off to lead a glamorous life trimmed by fame and recognition so overstressed in the physical battle, Siddhartha willingly "become empty, become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure and sorrow-to let the Self die". Yet even Samanas' self-sacrificing ways can't satisfy Siddhartha's growing crave for wisdom that he leaves the Samanas to plunge into a new life of hallow desires. The unique nature of our protagonist is how he fights his inner Self by "fleeting from myself" to become himself. Yet the kind of wisdom Siddhartha yearns can only be found when he surrenders to Self and embraces what his nature fully encompasses. Having accomplished his spiritual hero deeds of fighting then becoming One with Self, Siddhartha is reborn through rising above the dark cluster of ignorance of his dissipate life to be enlightened under a mango tree. Only when he comes to reconciliation with his Self through acceptance of fate, does Siddhartha attains his wisdom after he yields to what destiny unfolds. What a fresh breeze it must be to be abandoned by the commonality of the material world only to be saved through the hell of unrest and discontent through the lessons of humanity: the pain of love, price of wisdom, and temptation of fear.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Breath of wisdom in the ignorant world, 27. Februar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Siddhartha. (Taschenbuch)
In a society obsessed with the concrete heroism found only in action heroes, Siddhartha clears a path of quest for answers in a world where nothing seems to stand by itself anymore. A spiritual hero in quest for Selfhood, the son of Brahmin forsakes the luxuries and comfort of his home to join the wandering Samanas in the forest. Siddhartha's motive to abandon his familiar environment is his hunger for answers; instead of setting off to lead a glamorous life trimmed by fame and recognition so overstressed in the physical battle, Siddhartha willingly "become empty, become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure and sorrow-to let the Self die". Yet even Samanas' self-sacrificing ways can't satisfy Siddhartha's growing crave for wisdom that he leaves the Samanas to plunge into a new life of hallow desires. The unique nature of our protagonist is how he fights his inner Self by "fleeting from myself" to become himself. Yet the kind of wisdom Siddhartha yearns can only be found when he surrenders to Self and embraces what his nature fully encompasses. Having accomplished his spiritual hero deeds of fighting then becoming One with Self, Siddhartha is reborn through rising above the dark cluster of ignorance of his dissipate life to be enlightened under a mango tree. Only when he comes to reconciliation with his Self through acceptance of fate, does Siddhartha attains his wisdom after he yields to what destiny unfolds. What a fresh breeze it must be to be abandoned by the commonality of the material world only to be saved through the hell of unrest and discontent through the lessons of humanity: the pain of love, price of wisdom, and temptation of fear.
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