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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Marv introduces you to the comic noir of Miller's "Sin City"
In a note in the back of "The Hard Goodbye," Frank Miller explains that this one got away from him. What was supposed to be a 48-page crime thriller turned into a 200-page graphic novel, all because Marv, the story's brutal misanthropic protagonist, started bossing Miller around. If you have seen "Sin City" the movie where Mickey Rourke steals the film...
Veröffentlicht am 20. Juni 2005 von Lawrance Bernabo

versus
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Falsche Auflage
Anders als in der Beschreibung wurde mir die Auflage von 2010 geliefert.
Inhaltlich zwar identisch - mehr als ärgerlich ist aber, dass sich die Buchrücken der 2005er Auflage aneinandergereiht zu einem Motiv ergänzen und im Regal einfach gut aussehen. Vor allem wenn man bedenkt, dass "Sin City" neben der Story auch durch das Visuelle besticht. Mit einem...
Veröffentlicht am 3. Dezember 2010 von Michael Stroot


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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Marv introduces you to the comic noir of Miller's "Sin City", 20. Juni 2005
Von 
Lawrance Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City 1. Hard Goodbye: Hard Goodbye Bk. 1 (Taschenbuch)
In a note in the back of "The Hard Goodbye," Frank Miller explains that this one got away from him. What was supposed to be a 48-page crime thriller turned into a 200-page graphic novel, all because Marv, the story's brutal misanthropic protagonist, started bossing Miller around. If you have seen "Sin City" the movie where Mickey Rourke steals the film as Marv, then you can understand Miller's explanation. You will understand it even more when you read the graphic novel, the first volume in the Miller's comic noir saga.
For me Frank Miller began the road that ends in "Sin City" with "Daredevil" #164, which retold the hero's origin. There is a series of panels in which Daredevil is chasing down the Fixer, the man who arranged the fight that Battling Murdock refused to throw. In each frame Daredevil gets closer to his quarry and cutting across the panels is a line representing the Fixer's heart beat, which goes from blind panic to full cardiac arrest before flatlining. It was at that point that I knew Miller was starting to think of what he could do with art in a comic book. After his work on "Daredevil" there was "Ronin" and "The Dark Knight Returns," and eventually Miller gets to Marv.
There is no doubt that Marv is the walking path of destruction that dominates this narrative. He is extremely violent, deeply disturbed, and whatever medication he is taking is just not doing the job. Still, he is a sympathetic figure because pretty much everybody he is maiming and killing are the real scum of the earth and he is on a mission to avenge the death of Goldie, the beautiful blonde who gave him a toss in the hay. He falls asleep in bed with her, having one of those moments of true happiness that never bodes well, and wakes up with her dead and the cops on their way. Marv is being set up, but that is incidental in his mind to the fact somebody killed Goldie, so somebody has to pay along with everybody else who stands in his way. The grand irony here is Marv and his interior monologues are the voice of sanity by the time he finds the killer.
The characters and the dialogue are easy to characterize as Mickey Spillane types on steroids. Then there is Miller's artwork as he explores what can done with just black and white on a page. The result is wildly experimental and sometimes you can a sense of how rough Miller's ideas are by the time he finishes a page. The first page of the story is more black than white, with Goldie's lips, the outline of her hair, the white skin exposed by the strapless gown and gloves etched out in seductive folds sets the tone for the artwork. The second page is the opposite with more white than black and offers a more conventional view of Marv and Goldie, and already you like the first page better. The third page offers a synthesis of the first two and it is like Miller is laying out the new ground rules. There are figures reduced to silhouettes except for hair or teeth (or bandages), and others reduced to white images against a field of black. Then we get to Marv standing in the rain in Chapter 8 and looking at the statue of Cardinal Roarke, at which point Miller is trying something completely different from the rest of the book.
I have no doubt that if Miller was to do "The Hard Goodbye" today that there would be significant changes in the artwork that would provide a refinement of the raw energy displayed here. There are times when the justification for the artwork seems to clearly be that it is different from the pages Miller has just drawn as opposed to be the best way of illustrating that part of the narrative. But this is the first story in an ongoing series, so allowances can be made if Miller really did decide to do a page a certainly way for no other reason than he had not done one that way yet. After all, it is not like he was coming up with 200 different pages of artwork and by the time you get to Chapter 8, which I think is artistically far and away the best of the entire graphic novel, it is equally clear Miller knows exactly what he is doing and all of the pieces are falling into place. The joy of watching the art evolve in this story makes up for the rough patches.
These stories were originally published in issues #51-62 of the Dark Horse comic book series "Dark Horses Presents" and in the "Dark Horse Presents Fifth Anniversary Special." This second edition has come out with the rest of the extant "Sin City" collection in term to be gobbled up by fans of the movie version and those who come from the theater to the graphic novel will probably be surprised how faithful Robert Rodriguez was to Frank Miller's story and vision. Then again, that was the whole point of doing the film the way it was done.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sin City is Absolute Heaven for Noir Fans, 4. Mai 2000
Von 
Jeffrey A. Veyera "Jeff Veyera" (Matthews, NC United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City (Taschenbuch)
No one in his right mind would argue with Frank Miller's pedigree as a comic artist. Miller single-handedly reinvented the superhero genre with his seminal "Batman: The Dark Night Returns" in 1986, then took on a flagging Daredevil title and made it the most gripping reading available in the comic book racks. Even the X-Clone fans had to applaud Miller for breathing life into a dying medium.
And then he created "Sin City," making everything which came before seem amateurish in comparison.
"Sin City" is the story of a down-on-his-luck,dumb schlub named Marv who wanders into a tangled situation he cannot begin to understand. Naturally, his life heads straight down the toilet immediately after making love to an incredibly beautiful woman. Marv's single-minded pursuit of vengeance consumes the remainder of the series in true film noir fashion.
I could go on and on about the classic noir elements Miller blends into the tale, the obvious glee he takes in crafting this work, or the extraordinary nature of the villain he has constructed to be Marv's foil.
Forget all that and look at the art. It explodes off the page in glorious black and white. Miller's use of light and shadow and the cinematic nature of his composition is the most remarkable thing I have seen in the medium. The best way I can describe the illustrations in this series is to say it looks like a storyboard Orson Welles would have put together for "Touch of Evil."
Let's face it: "Sin City" is no "Othello." ("Titus Andronicus," maybe, "Othello," no.) But Miller's not looking to create great literature here, as Chris Claremont often attempts in his overwrought "X-Men." Instead, he's treating his fans to a tightly-wound, suspenseful romp through a visceral urban swamp.
This is a book you'll read straight through to the shocking end, and I heartily recommend it to anyone tired of the Todd McFarlane clones and their spandex jive.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen AMAZING. AMAZING. AMAZING. AMAZING., 22. April 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City (Taschenbuch)
Get dark. Get bloody dark.

This tale of twisted love and satisfying vengeance breaks the mold of comic art and plot.

Sin City comes at you with pummeling force. In pure Film Noir tradtion, the characters are gritty and tough. The females aren't women but dames. The Scenes are rendered in pure black and white that adds to the clear distinction between good and evil set by the story.

You wont find subleties here. The plot is straightforward, just like the dialogue. The action is quick and inventive. The violence gruesome (barbed wire laced with razor-blades to begin with).

The true subtlety of this book is its very existence. Nothing is quite like it. No one will even dare. Except maybe Frank Miller.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Falsche Auflage, 3. Dezember 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City 1. Hard Goodbye: Hard Goodbye Bk. 1 (Taschenbuch)
Anders als in der Beschreibung wurde mir die Auflage von 2010 geliefert.
Inhaltlich zwar identisch - mehr als ärgerlich ist aber, dass sich die Buchrücken der 2005er Auflage aneinandergereiht zu einem Motiv ergänzen und im Regal einfach gut aussehen. Vor allem wenn man bedenkt, dass "Sin City" neben der Story auch durch das Visuelle besticht. Mit einem sehr sachlich gestalteten Buchrücken aus Band 1 der 2010er Auflage wirkt das Ganze natürlich nicht mehr.
Mein Fazit: Wenn die Bände von Amazon kommen sollen, lieber gleich zur 2010er Auflage greifen, um einen zwar langweiligen, dafür aber einheitlichen Look zu gewährleisten.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen NEW AGE CRIME NOVEL.READ THIS BOOK, YOU WILL THANK ME LATER!, 11. Mai 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City (Taschenbuch)
the town of sin city is an unforgiving town in which anything can and will happen. From the first page you are intrigued by what is going on, and it keeps you wanting to continue reading the story. It is told in black and white comic book format but do not let that discourage you from reading or even buying this book. The unique style of Frank Miller tears you into this world of hate and revenge and makes you feel for the main character Marv. It is a classic revenge story told in a new way, in which a criminal uses his "skills" to get done what needs to get done. The characters are living, breathing people and you want them to suceed in thier goals. This book will knock your socks off.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Marv introduces you to the comic noir of Miller's "Sin City", 2. Mai 2005
Von 
Lawrance Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
In a note in the back of "The Hard Goodbye," Frank Miller explains that this one got away from him. What was supposed to be a 48-page crime thriller turned into a 200-page graphic novel, all because Marv, the story's brutal misanthropic protagonist, started bossing Miller around. If you have seen "Sin City" the movie where Mickey Rourke steals the film as Marv, then you can understand Miller's explanation. You will understand it even more when you read the graphic novel, the first volume in the Miller's comic noir saga.
For me Frank Miller began the road that ends in "Sin City" with "Daredevil" #164, which retold the hero's origin. There is a series of panels in which Daredevil is chasing down the Fixer, the man who arranged the fight that Battling Murdock refused to throw. In each frame Daredevil gets closer to his quarry and cutting across the panels is a line representing the Fixer's heart beat, which goes from blind panic to full cardiac arrest before flatlining. It was at that point that I knew Miller was starting to think of what he could do with art in a comic book. After his work on "Daredevil" there was "Ronin" and "The Dark Knight Returns," and eventually Miller gets to Marv.
There is no doubt that Marv is the walking path of destruction that dominates this narrative. He is extremely violent, deeply disturbed, and whatever medication he is taking is just not doing the job. Still, he is a sympathetic figure because pretty much everybody he is maiming and killing are the real scum of the earth and he is on a mission to avenge the death of Goldie, the beautiful blonde who gave him a toss in the hay. He falls asleep in bed with her, having one of those moments of true happiness that never bodes well, and wakes up with her dead and the cops on their way. Marv is being set up, but that is incidental in his mind to the fact somebody killed Goldie, so somebody has to pay along with everybody else who stands in his way. The grand irony here is Marv and his interior monologues are the voice of sanity by the time he finds the killer.
The characters and the dialogue are easy to characterize as Mickey Spillane types on steroids. Then there is Miller's artwork as he explores what can done with just black and white on a page. The result is wildly experimental and sometimes you can a sense of how rough Miller's ideas are by the time he finishes a page. The first page of the story is more black than white, with Goldie's lips, the outline of her hair, the white skin exposed by the strapless gown and gloves etched out in seductive folds sets the tone for the artwork. The second page is the opposite with more white than black and offers a more conventional view of Marv and Goldie, and already you like the first page better. The third page offers a synthesis of the first two and it is like Miller is laying out the new ground rules. There are figures reduced to silhouettes except for hair or teeth (or bandages), and others reduced to white images against a field of black. Then we get to Marv standing in the rain in Chapter 8 and looking at the statue of Cardinal Roarke, at which point Miller is trying something completely different from the rest of the book.
I have no doubt that if Miller was to do "The Hard Goodbye" today that there would be significant changes in the artwork that would provide a refinement of the raw energy displayed here. There are times when the justification for the artwork seems to clearly be that it is different from the pages Miller has just drawn as opposed to be the best way of illustrating that part of the narrative. But this is the first story in an ongoing series, so allowances can be made if Miller really did decide to do a page a certainly way for no other reason than he had not done one that way yet. After all, it is not like he was coming up with 200 different pages of artwork and by the time you get to Chapter 8, which I think is artistically far and away the best of the entire graphic novel, it is equally clear Miller knows exactly what he is doing and all of the pieces are falling into place. The joy of watching the art evolve in this story makes up for the rough patches.
These stories were originally published in issues #51-62 of the Dark Horse comic book series "Dark Horses Presents" and in the "Dark Horse Presents Fifth Anniversary Special." This second edition has come out with the rest of the extant "Sin City" collection in term to be gobbled up by fans of the movie version and those who come from the theater to the graphic novel will probably be surprised how faithful Robert Rodriguez was to Frank Miller's story and vision. Then again, that was the whole point of doing the film the way it was done.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The tragic monster in us all, who goes by the name of Marv, 27. Juli 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City (Taschenbuch)
This tale is one of the most emotional stories to pass over a books pages. A man, who shows the dark side of humanity shows what we all want to gain, undying love. Yes, he was used, but that doesn't matter. He loves just the same. He gives everything he has to avenge the woman he loves. Though he doesn't believe it, he is a hero, but the darkest mankind has ever seen. He is in a war against the world, and as one friend stated in A Dame To Kill For, the world has to kill him, it has noe place for him. Anyone who denies the emotion in this book missed something big. Great job to Frank Miller for making us care about the most brutal, evil, white knight to ever walk the earth.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Yes you did miss something!!!, 22. Juni 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City (Taschenbuch)
Yes you missed the commitment of the character to achieve his goal. Sin City is not just a comic book and to reserve it only for consumption within that market is narrow minded and trite. Our main character in this story has neither the time nor the capacity for subtlety, why should he he has a job to do, the only woman he has ever loved is dead by the hand of those more resourceful and physically adept. He must find and sanction her killer before those who seek to accuse and destroy him do so. The story is too packed with emotion to be lost in the subtlety and supplemental language of a super hero or ninja story. Daredevil, Dark Knight, and Ronin were what they were and cannot be associated with Sin City. Miller is one of the best comic book creators in history, however Sin City transcends comics and takes the reader on an elsewhere voyage through the human spirit. You must approach Sin City differenetly, after all we aren't in Metropolis anymore.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Frank Miller proves that his best work is yet to come., 22. August 1997
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City (Taschenbuch)
Frank Miller, the man who masterminded The Dark Knight Returns, Ronin, and Elektra, once again shocks audiences with Sin City.
Marv, a guy who couldn't afford a hooker with all the money in the world because he's so ugly, gets one amazing night with his dream girl. When he wakes up the next day to find her dead, Marv vows to get back in a big way on the people that did in the only person who was ever nice to him.
The artwork is phenomenal, and it creates a perfect atmosphere for the setting Miller creates. Marv is as close to real as a fictitious character can get. With excellent narrative, Miller combines great art and a great story together and creates some of his best work yet.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It stands the test of time, 19. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sin City (Taschenbuch)
I've already reviewed this book previously about a year and a half ago, and I thought it would be interesting for those who are thinking of buying this book to see if they will enjoy it not only in the present, but for years to come. This storyline, and these characters are so intriguing and fascinating that you can't help but read the tales again. I've read them all, and occassionally, you just get the urge to revisit this place outside of reality, but then again, all so close. The connection you feel to the characters is something special if you can see yourself in them. You can't help but come back every once and a while called Sin City.
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Sin City 1. Hard Goodbye: Hard Goodbye Bk. 1
Sin City 1. Hard Goodbye: Hard Goodbye Bk. 1 von Frank Miller (Taschenbuch - 2010)
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